When Diplomacy Fails

By Zack Twamley

On Going since May 2012 • Updated weekly

A weekly podcast covering the build up to, breakout of and consequences of various conflicts in history.

All Episodes

  Direct Link   Download 40 Minutes 23 Oct 2019

Breitenfeld. The most important battle of the Thirty Years War in my view, and the ideal but also terrifying testing ground for all of Gustavus' new reforms. Could the Swedish King leverage all his innovations in the infantry drill, in the use of artillery, or in the harnessing of cavalry's best bits? Or would he be just another victim to Count Tilly's war machine? You probably know the answer, considering his large fame, but you may not know the story of how it all happened. With a focus that I don't usually take, WDF is going to the battlefield for once, so I hope to see you all there!Obligatory shout out to my wonderful patrons, who have rallied to the colours for our special offer in October 2019, and have nearly helped us smash our goal of $2k! Amazing! If you want a signed copy of our book an your name in the acknowledgements, make sure you sign up to become a PhD Pal now! Time is of the essence, as October is your ONLY CHANCE to make it happen! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 37 Minutes 09 Oct 2019

At long last, our series on 17th century warfare smacks straight into the man many of you probably came all this way to see. What did Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden do to make his name in the military sphere? Did he really do all that is often assumed? Do we give me too much credit? What, at the base level, can it truly be said that he accomplished? Come and find out here, as we look at the Swedish king's innovations in infantry drill, firepower, artillery and cavalry, to build a picture of the most famous Swede in the game. If you think you know Gustavus, you ain't seen nothing yet!I would remiss if I didn't thank all my lovely patrons for making the first week of this special offer such a massive success! Our Patreon income has exploded by more than 15%, up over $200, and we have an army of nearly TWENTY PhD Pals now on our side! If you want to get your name in lights in our new Thirty Years War book, and get it signed, delivered to your door, then make sure you sign up to become a PhD Pal in the month of October. Thanksss! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 35 Minutes 01 Oct 2019

It's high time we marked such an auspicious occasion with something of a celebration - for the month of October 2019, we have a very special offer to reveal to listeners and patrons all. It's nothing less than a chance for YOU to get your name in lights, get yourself our latest book, and feast on premium content for years to come. History friends have never had it so good, but being a PhD Pal, now THAT'S where it's at!Read the related blog post here: https://www.wdfpodcast.com/thevassalstate/phdpal Does being a PhD Pal sound interesting to you? Click here! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 37 Minutes 25 Sep 2019

In our ninth installment on 17th century warfare, we assess the overall contribution of the Dutch to the military revolution, through a few important spheres. We will learn that spreading the word about new technological innovations was not an unusual practice, and that Europeans were far more willing to share their discoveries than we may have previously imagined. In addition, we examine how the drill became the supreme method of warfare, and how it inculcated a sense of discipline which profoundly affected European society on the battlefield as much as off. The journey involves one of discipline, forbearance and continued practice, and obsolete methods of making war did not go quietly...*********Click here to pre-order the book|Click here to sign up on Patreon from as little as $2 a month and access awesome goodies!|Click here to find our dedicated section of the website|AND#1)Follow us on Twitter#2)Like us on Facebook#3)Join the history friends group! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 31 Minutes 16 Sep 2019

How did Poland and Lithuania come to be joined together as one state? Here we answer that critically important question, as well as several others which go along with it. Of course, our story may begin in the year 1700, but we would be remiss if we didn't mention several threads of the story which brings the narrative to that point. Why did the Commonwealth have an elective monarchy? Why were the nobility so powerful? And perhaps the most pressing question - how did a pagan grand duke of Lithuania, the last of his kind, become engaged to the sole heir of Poland's Catholic Angevin King? It's a story which needs to be heard in full, so make sure you don't miss out! Thanksss so much for making Poland possible, and remember that by listening in, you're not just helping make it viable, you're also funding my PhD! I can't thank you enough!Check out Poland Is Not Yet Lost in full by clicking here For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 33 Minutes 16 Sep 2019

Where did the inspiration to tackle this project come from, what sources have we devoured, and what can you expect from this series? These questions and so many more besides will be addressed here, so make sure you get the full picture of what we're up to by listening in!Click here to access all of what Poland has to offer! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 30 Minutes 16 Sep 2019

FINALLY! After several years, countless teases, numerous changed plans, and no shortage of research, one of the most anticipated series we have ever tackled lands at long last. Poland Is Not Yet Lost has been made possible thanks to the incredible support I received from you, my patrons, so I hope you'll check this first introduction episode out as we set the scene, and set forth some of our plans for this fascinating and very chunky series.Click here to sign up on Patreon and get ALL Poland has to offer! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 49 Minutes 09 Sep 2019

After covering the adoption of a revolutionary new musket drill by Maurice of Nassau in the late 1590s, in this episode we come to the point where all of these innovations would be put to the test, so I hope you’re ready to listen in, as the full horrors of constant barrages of lead on the human body were felt to their full effect for the first time in Western Europe, in the relatively unknown Battle of Nieuwpoort, in July 1600.This episode provides a key example of what made the Military Revolution so unique and important for European warfare. From Maurice’s display at Nieuwpoort, so many other innovations would follow, including the adoption of its key lessons by other powers, and the perfecting and adding to them by others, like the Swedish and French. Before long, the drill would be the staple means by which infantry would take the field, and training these men and giving them the platform they needed to succeed would become the occupation of all competent commanders in early modern Europe. Make sure you tune in here to see what made innovators like Maurice of Nassau tick, and why he was so important for his time. We also get a window into how the Dutch government organised its military, and what they were up against in the sheer professional supremacy of the Spanish tercio system. I hope you enjoy it history friends! Make sure you spread the word – thanksss!*********Click here to pre-order the book | Click here to sign up on Patreon from as little as $2 a month and access awesome goodies! | Click here to find our dedicated section of the website | AND #1) Follow us on Twitter #2) Like us on Facebook #3) Join the history friends group! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 40 Minutes 09 Sep 2019

We're back! At long last, after a lot of confusing scheduling and weird decisions, WDF is finally ready to introduce to you what we have planned for the next few years. It is an investigation of the Thirty Years War (1618-1648) like you've never seen it before, and I couldn't be more excited to begin! Listen in here for a rundown of what we've done so far since our too eager release back in May 2018, and what we plan to do going forward. For those confused with what this all means, and why there's so many introduction episodes floating around, look no further than this episode, which is made up of explainers, disclaimers, and probably a few complainers! Thanksss!Click here to pre-order the book | Click here to sign up on Patreon from as little as $2 a month and access awesome goodies! | Click here to find our dedicated section of the website | AND #1) Follow us on Twitter #2) Like us on Facebook #3) Join the history friends group! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 65 Minutes 17 Aug 2019

What a lovely surprise! I sat down with Kaner [Ken] and Amby [Gavin], two Ozzies with a love of the game Diplomacy, which I have name dropped many times on this show. The three of us chat about a whole range of topics, from our experiences playing the game, to my recent projects and the processes involved with them, to current examples of diplomacy failing. It was a great chat and I had a wonderful time, and if you did too, make sure to check out their show Diplomacy Games, and follow the links below!Subscribe to their show [iTunes]: https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/diplomacy-games/id1148827717 Subscribe to their show [Stitcher]: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/diplomacy-games?refid=stpr If you are interested in playing Diplomacy online, check these links:webDiplomacy - https://webdiplomacy.netplayDiplomacy - https://www.playdiplomacy.comvDiplomacy - https://www.vdiplomacy.net For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 65 Minutes 17 Aug 2019

What a lovely surprise! I sat down with Kaner [Ken] and Amby [Gavin], two Ozzies with a love of the game Diplomacy, which I have name dropped many times on this show. The three of us chat about a whole range of topics, from our experiences playing the game, to my recent projects and the processes involved with them, to current examples of diplomacy failing. It was a great chat and I had a wonderful time, and if you did too, make sure to check out their show Diplomacy Games, and follow the links below!Subscribe to their show [iTunes]: https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/diplomacy-games/id1148827717 Subscribe to their show [Stitcher]: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/diplomacy-games?refid=stpr If you are interested in playing Diplomacy online, check these links:webDiplomacy - https://webdiplomacy.netplayDiplomacy - https://www.playdiplomacy.comvDiplomacy - https://www.vdiplomacy.net For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 65 Minutes 17 Aug 2019

What a lovely surprise! I sat down with Kaner [Ken] and Amby [Gavin], two Ozzies with a love of the game Diplomacy, which I have name dropped many times on this show. The three of us chat about a whole range of topics, from our experiences playing the game, to my recent projects and the processes involved with them, to current examples of diplomacy failing. It was a great chat and I had a wonderful time, and if you did too, make sure to check out their show Diplomacy Games, and follow the links below!Subscribe to their show [iTunes]: https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/diplomacy-games/id1148827717 Subscribe to their show [Stitcher]: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/diplomacy-games?refid=stpr If you are interested in playing Diplomacy online, check these links:webDiplomacy - https://webdiplomacy.netplayDiplomacy - https://www.playdiplomacy.comvDiplomacy - https://www.vdiplomacy.net For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 65 Minutes 17 Aug 2019

What a lovely surprise! I sat down with Kaner [Ken] and Amby [Gavin], two Ozzies with a love of the game Diplomacy, which I have name dropped many times on this show. The three of us chat about a whole range of topics, from our experiences playing the game, to my recent projects and the processes involved with them, to current examples of diplomacy failing. It was a great chat and I had a wonderful time, and if you did too, make sure to check out their show Diplomacy Games, and follow the links below!Subscribe to their show [iTunes]: https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/diplomacy-games/id1148827717 Subscribe to their show [Stitcher]: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/diplomacy-games?refid=stpr If you are interested in playing Diplomacy online, check these links:webDiplomacy - https://webdiplomacy.netplayDiplomacy - https://www.playdiplomacy.comvDiplomacy - https://www.vdiplomacy.net For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 30 Minutes 10 Jul 2019

The Versailles Anniversary Project consumed 8 months of my life, and 8 months of your attention. It was the largest, most ambitious, and most exhausting project we have ever taken on. What did this 'taking on' actually look like though? You may know that it was a long hard enjoyable slog, but what else is there to the story of this monster, which, as the statistics show, has taken more than 67 hours to fully unwrap? Well history friend, look no further, as finally bid farewell to this project once and for all.No concluding revelations here - just the musings and memories of me, your host, as I spill the beans about my experience. If you were curious, or had more questions about how I did this, then look no further. A huge thanksss must be said once more history friend, for maing Versailles the best place to be for well over half a year. Here's to the next audio adventure, but until then, I will see you all on 9th September for the Thirty Years War!************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 68 Minutes 08 Jul 2019

After 8 months and 85 episodes, what is left to say? As it turns out, quite a lot, so I hope you'll join me as we wrap up the longest project we've ever tackled here at WDF. The questions of German responsibility, of Woodrow Wilson's selective compromising, and the exercise of finger pointing all come under our microscope, as we deliver our final words on this saga. Thanksss so much for your support over the last few months, and here's to our next audio adventure!****The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 97 Minutes 08 Jul 2019

In this episode, we conclude our story f the delegates who partook in this romp through alternative history and imagination land over the last six months. You are all a credit to history podcast listeners, and thanksss so much for making such hard work be so much darn fun. What does the world look like up to 1945? What did the delegates do after 1919 to make their mark upon the world? Furthermore, who would walk away with the coveted 74th ANNUAL DELEGATION GAME AWARDS!? Find out here! Thanks again, you are the best dear delegates. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 58 Minutes 06 Jul 2019

It's high time we examined where the Germans fit into all of this mess. Having been left with the most unfair treaty in the universe, how could these poor unfortunate Germans possibly repair and move on? My point, as I make many times in this final episodes of our project, is that the German responsibility for this 'moving on' rested with the Germans and the Germans alone. An imperfect Treaty was not an excuse for Nazism. A did not automatically equal B, and the Treaty of Versailles did not have to lead inexorably to WW2. To claim that it did, to recall those few sentences in a textbook which proclaims as such, is to seriously underrate the responsibility of individuals in Germany, Hitler included of course, for what followed.Few would ever seek to claim that Hitler was justified, but the problem was, he used this Treaty as justification for his earlier successes in peacetime, and while we recognise these successes were wrong, we also let his core argument go unchallenged. If Hitler was wrong to invoke the Treaty when marching into the Rhineland, annexing Austria or seizing the Sudetenland, then it stands that neither he nor his contemporaries were justified in proclaiming that the Treaty of Versailles 'made him do it'. No, it was the German people who made WW2 possible, and setting the record straight in this regard is a mission which is long overdue...*******The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 95 Minutes 05 Jul 2019

Vittorio Orlando, George Clemenceau, David Lloyd George and Woodrow Wilson. Four men, who over the last eight months, had been more central to the development of the peace, and thus the development of the 20th century, than any other figures. In this episode, we remember each man and his story during this eight month period. What struggles did each face, what triumphs did they enjoy, and what has history come to say about each of them? Can any one of them truly claim to have succeeded? If all had some qualms with the Treaty, was that Treaty even worth anything? A century later, how do explain the behaviour of these men, and what does it tell us about the Treaty which emerged afterwards?Was there a good guy and a bad guy? Not quite, and just like in 1914, there was no smoking gun. The big four were four men in a sea of others, who tried their best to change the narrative, and to make something new. Each man differed as to exactly what he wanted, but all were united on one thing - a desire to avoid at all costs, a repeat of the Great War. Unfortunately, it is impossible now to avoid the conclusion that they failed, but as we've also learned, not a single one of them went down without a fight. In fact, for a few, the struggle which followed the Treaty truly was a matter of life and death.Track down the song Whirlwinds of Danger which we used in our intermission by clicking here ************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 65 Minutes 01 Jul 2019

Germany and Austria receive their peace treaties, amidst an atmosphere which was calm and collected in some places, but scheming and troubling in others. Could it be guaranteed that these arrangements would stand the test of time? Who was left pleased, where others were enraged? Was anyone listening to the small people? Find out in our final narrative episode of the Delegation Game! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 45 Minutes 30 Jun 2019

Just because the main event had been and gone, did not mean that the story ended here. For many delegates and peacemakers, the mission remained one of leveraging as many advantages from the peace treaty as possible. For others, it was a case of working with friends and foes alike to secure their borders or their interests once they returned home. Returning home, indeed, was on the agenda on many statesmen who had helped make the treaty. Yet, the signing of the Treaty of Versailles did not mean that the leaders outside of the Big Four were satisfied, and in this episode, we hone in on their experiences, and tell their side of the story.*************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 43 Minutes 28 Jun 2019

On This Day in history a century ago! What else, other than that infamous scene. After more than eight months, we reach that scene. What exactly was the Hall of Mirrors like to sit in? We have the answers. What did the Germans look like? Again, we have it covered. What were the consequences, of these signatures of the century? Again, we have it covered in Episode 82 of this whopper project. We've been on quite a journey over the last few months, and I couldn't have done without you all. So thanksss so much - sit back, relax and mark this regretful anniversary the only way we can, by listening and wondering what might have been, or how it should have ended.See you on the other side of Versailles....******The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 44 Minutes 27 Jun 2019

If you thought we'd simply fast forward to the infamous scene where the Germans signed on the dotted line, then you haven't been paying attention! Between the 24 and 27 June, there was a great deal going down, even if many of the peacemakers had mentally checked out, knowing that the signing was only a few days away. As the allies blamed the Germans for Scapa Flow, and Clemenceau imagined a new scheme involving the occupation of the city of Essen, the Germans worked to find someone, anyone, who would sign. The German Colonial Minister would request his title be changed, so that he wouldn't be known as the German colonial minister who signed away Germany's colonies, and this individual, Johan Bell, made his way with Herman Mueller, the German Foreign Minister, to Versailles. The ground was being prepared for the scene, but there seemed like an overall feeling of 'meh' had crept in. Was it not a bit of anticlimax, after all they'd worked on together, that the end result was just some unhappy Germans? Perhaps, but that couldn't be allowed to stand in the way of the gravity of the moment. The 28th loomed, and peacemakers pushed relentlessly on...******The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 52 Minutes 24 Jun 2019

With a German Treaty tantalisingly close to completion, it remained to do the rounds, and find out exactly what was bothering or motivating the various delegates. Some last minute agreements, goals, and even strategic alliances were possible, as these peacemakers imagined life after the Treaty of Buckingham... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 31 Minutes 23 Jun 2019

Join me and other history friends on Flick - a great app for history friends and important conversations!My agora friends and others are going to be in New York for a special conference on 29th June - meet Mike Duncan, Kevin Stroud, David Crowther and more! Search Intelligent Speech Conference now! Use the code WDF to get 5% off your ticket!On This Day a century ago, the Germans finally accepted the unacceptable. They finally arrived at the point where they determined that enough was enough. Or, to be more accurate, they exhausted their appeals, and realised that the choice between war or shame was not much of a choice at all. They would pick shame, with several caveats. They had tried everything else - their final appeal was one requesting another 48 hours delay, which the allies refused, likely because of the events at Scapa Flow 48 hours before.Now there was truly no going back. They would have to accept the peace treaty, warts and all, the same peace which Ulrich von Brockdorff-Rantzau had so spurned on 7th May. This treaty was virtually unchanged, as was the allied determination to press home their considerable advantages if it proved necessary. No, the new Chancellor and his President said, they could not risk the fate of Germans by a refusal. So it was that the German assembly voted explicitly to outlaw the use of this moment for political gains in the future - a seriously significant moment which was later subsumed under Nazi propaganda. It could not be denied that the German statesmen, from virtually all parties, had assented.The Ayes to the right were legion, and nobody could be quite sure what would happen next. First things first though, they needed to find some Germans wiling to journey to Paris and sign - this proved to be the next trying phase of the peace conference, but back in Paris, the celebrations were beginning early. After so many months of work, it was finally time to revel in the fact that it was over, and soon they would be going home...*****The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 32 Minutes 22 Jun 2019

Join me and other history friends on Flick - a great app for history friends and important conversations!My agora friends and others are going to be in New York for a special conference on 29th June - meet Mike Duncan, Kevin Stroud, David Crowther and more! Search Intelligent Speech Conference now! Use the code WDF to get 5% off your ticket!Our latest episode contains the following theme, expressed by the Germans, to the effect that Germany would not accept the so-called 'war guilt clause'. The 22nd of June was a day of intense anxiety for the Germans and big three alike, because of this theme of defiance, and also, in a sense, delusion. The news of Scapa Flow hardly helped, as any sense of sympathy had been torpedoed, pun intended, and the Germans were faced with another brick wall. One particularly defiant message was sent in the late afternoon of 22nd June by Gustav Bauer, the German Chancellor, who clung to the notion that the most offensive articles could be deleted from the final version of the peace treaty, and it read:Germany further lays the greatest emphasis on the declaration that she cannot accept article 231 of the Treaty of Peace which requires Germany to admit herself to be the sole and only author of the war, and does not cover this article by her signature. It consequently follows without further argument that Germany must also decline to recognise that the burdens should be placed upon her on the score of the responsibility for the war which has unjustly been laid at her door.And that wasn't all - as it became evident that Germany would soon either tumble into an unwinnable war, or face the ultimate shame, statesmen across Europe were already planning for what would happen next. Yet, it was outside of Europe, in the court of the newest world power, that these decisions would prove most biting of all. What would the American President do with that undeniable tide of isolationism threatening to subsume American politics? And what would Europe do if, contrary to his public pronouncements, he was in fact submerged?******The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 34 Minutes 21 Jun 2019

Join me and other history friends on Flick - a great app for history friends and important conversations!My agora friends and others are going to be in New York for a special conference on 29th June - meet Mike Duncan, Kevin Stroud, David Crowther and more! Search Intelligent Speech Conference now! Use the code WDF to get 5% off your ticket!Within this episode we tell the incredible story of Scapa Flow, that infamous event in the twilight of the peace conference, where the German admiral von Reuter determined that he had no choice other than to scuttle his ships. As we will learn here though, the decision which the German admiral took was not a straightforward case of a German doing bold things, and debate rages on to this day over whether or not the act was a result of misunderstanding, or deliberate sabotage.We also provide some background to the situation at Scapa Flow. How long had von Reuter's 74 ships been at this harbour, and why were they interned, rather than simply handed over as a surrender? What did the allies plan to do with his ships, and how did they plan to overcome thier disagreements? Could anyone really afford to add these 74 ships to their naval arsenal, or should they be used instead as a beacon of hope, by handing them to the League of Nations? Maybe they should just be destroyed in a grand ceremony, the symbol of the Anglo-German naval race sinking beneath the waves. As we will learn, the scuttling didn't merely embarrass the British, it also saved any potential antagonism between the British and Americans. Perhaps, in some respects, the act was even a blessing in disguise?*************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 41 Minutes 21 Jun 2019

Join me and other history friends on Flick - a great app for history friends and important conversations!My agora friends and others are going to be in New York for a special conference on 29th June - meet Mike Duncan, Kevin Stroud, David Crowther and more! Search Intelligent Speech Conference now! Use the code WDF to get 5% off your ticket!While the allied rejection of the Counterproposals seemed to signify that there was no going back for Germany, certain individuals within the German delegation in Paris, and the German government back in Weimar, were keen to try a few final desperate things. At the top of the list of these desperate men was Ulrich von Brockdorff-Rantzau, the German Foreign Minister and recipient of the allied terms on 7th May. BR was, incredibly enough, not just planning to reject these terms, he was also preparing for war with the allies. What was more, this German and many of his peers in the German delegation had become convinced that this was the only way to avoid the humiliation of defeat, whatever the cost may be.So we examine here the forgotten story of Germany's planned resistance to the peace treaty, which the allies had made plain, could not be negotiated. To BR though, the apocalyptic vision of what would follow German rejection of the terms, complete with an allied invasion of German lands, soldiers in Berlin and maybe even the dissolution of the German Empire into individual German states, all this was worth it if it provided Germans with an opportunity amidst the carnage. As we will learn in this episode, BR was banking on noting less than an allied collapse in the midst of this invasion, which would enable Germans to bring the divided allies back to the negotiating table, and get a better peace. As we will also learn though, BR had it all wrong. So very wrong in fact, and the allies knew that at this point, it would have been the ultimate crime to hold back after coming this far...**********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 48 Minutes 18 Jun 2019

Operation Redeemer - that plan to relieve the besieged forces commanded by General David McCay in Kiev, spearheaded by a force commanded by Paul von Lettow Vorbeck, composed of Freikorps soldiers and other German volunteers. It was a story almost too incredible to be true - and yet, onwards the redeemed marched. Back in London, the peacemakers chaired the Arbitration Committee, and imagined life after the conference. It seemed that the pieces were coming together, but would everyone be standing by the end? For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 43 Minutes 16 Jun 2019

Join me and other history friends on Flick - a great app for history friends and important conversations! My agora friends and others are going to be in New York for a special conference on 29th June - meet Mike Duncan, Kevin Stroud, David Crowther and more! Search Intelligent Speech Conference now! Use the code WDF to get 5% off your ticket!On This Day in history a century ago, a significant milestone in the history of the Paris Peace Conference was reached, and like so many others we have come across, its significance is largely lost in the narrative. This allied response, examined in this episode, represented a solid defence of their peace treaty, and a rebuke of Germany’s pretences to be standing for the Fourteen Points. The allied response was devastating and formidable, in that it was effectively the answer to Germany's claims to any moral high ground. Germany could claim no such high ground, said the allies, for their past behaviour disqualified them from any such claims.The historian George Creel wrote on the allied response: "It is to be wished that the two documents – the German of May 29th and the Allied reply of June 16th – could be printed in every language and placed in every school and library, for they furnish in themselves a complete and dramatic exposition of the whole Peace Treaty, permitting the formation of an intelligent and independent opinion with respect to the confused question of justice or injustice."The significance of the communications could never be in doubt. What was in doubt was what might happen next. The allied language was certainly arranged to leave no doubt: "It is only justice that restitution should be made and that these wronged peoples should be safeguarded for a time from the competition of a nation whose industries are intact and have even been fortified by machinery stolen from occupied territories. If these things are hardships for Germany, they are hardships which Germany has brought upon herself. Somebody must suffer for the consequences of the war. Is it to be Germany, or only the peoples she has wronged?" There could be no doubt according to the big three - the Germans had to admit their wrongdoing, and what was more, this was the end of the debate. "In conclusion", their reply said, "the Allied and Associated Powers must make it clear that this letter and the memorandum attached constitute their last word."Failing the successful adherence by the Germans to these terms, "The said Armistice will then terminate, and the Allied and Associated Powers will take such steps as they think needful to enforce their Terms." It was, in short, do or die for the German government, and On This Day the scales finally fell from the German eyes...or did they? Listen to this fascinating examination of this forgotten moment to find out...********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 49 Minutes 12 Jun 2019

Join me and other history friends on Flick - a great app for history friends and important conversations!My agora friends and others are going to be in New York for a special conference on 29th June - meet Mike Duncan, Kevin Stroud, David Crowther and more! Search Intelligent Speech Conference now! Use the code WDF to get 5% off your ticket!Between 5 to 10 June 1919, one could be forgiven for imagining that the allies would be far too buys discussing the German counterproposals and their intended reply to do anything else. In fact, what we see on the morning of 5th June is a significant exchange between Paderewski and the big three, as Poland was placed on trial for its recent actions. It was almost as though the big three had nothing else to do, as their attentions were well and truly occupied with this largely unrelated issue.Or...was it so unrelated? After all, unless the border with Germany and Poland was finalised, and the question of Upper Silesia affirmed, there could be no clarity on the German Treaty as a whole. Furthermore, it was entirely possible that if the Poles were unclear about where they would have to stop in thier claims to nationhood, a conflict could erupt as soon as the peace was signed. As it happened, this conflict did erupt, but between Poles and Soviets rather than Poles and Germans. Solving the borders between the two states was just another divisive mission which the big three would have to accomplish, and it was plain that each individual had a different stake in the debate.Was it possible that while en route to the resolution of the peace treaty, the big three could get so tied up in other questions equally in need of resolution that they might never make it to the end? Possibly; at the very least, these destructive divisions which always remained under the surface, and which moved the French, Americans and British to grow their own positions on the different aspects of the peace refused to go away. Until compromise could be reached, a final settlement would thus be out of reach altogether.********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 60 Minutes 10 Jun 2019

An eventful fortnight indeed, as the delegates crowd around the table to read the latest on the German peace treaty, the dominions offer their views, the Germans seem to be scheming, and the Russians remain mysterious. Still, despite the setbacks and mistrust, the lies and disappointments, one could be forgiven for wondering - is this peace at last? For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 85 Minutes 06 Jun 2019

75 Years ago, our ancestors made a brave step towards the liberation of France from the most terrible of tyranny. Now, with the considerable help of Dr Peter Caddick-Adams, historian, journalist, author, reservist and more, I delve into this event, using the recently released book Sand and Steel - a New History of D-Day by the author as my guide. We get into so much detail here, and a huge thanksss must go out to Peter for being so swell and coming onto the show - I had a ball talking with him!To get Peter's book click on the link here OR enter our competition by sharing the relevant status on Twitter or Facebook...or both! The winner will get a signed copy of Peter's whopper book sent directly to their door, so don't delay! Competition ends Monday 10th June at 12 noon GMT. Thanksss! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 44 Minutes 05 Jun 2019

Join me and other history friends on Flick - a great app for history friends and important conversations!My agora friends and others are going to be in New York for a special conference on 29th June - meet Mike Duncan, Kevin Stroud, David Crowther and more! Search Intelligent Speech Conference now! Use the code WDF to get 5% off your ticket!The incredible story of the Paris Peace Conference addresses that all important question of: should they not really have been finished this madness by now?! The Counterproposals had by now been absorbed, and from the beginning it was clear that they were bound to cause divisions. Not mere technicians or delegates, but full blown PRIME MINISTERS were determined to lead these divisions. Lloyd George, after supporting just as many difficult clauses as his peers, was now convinced, after having met with his peers in the British Empire delegation, that the Treaty as it stood was unacceptable. If the Treaty was not changed, the PM claimed, then he would have to be allowed return to Parliament back in London, in a tactic not dissimilar to Vittorio Orlando, to justify it. In the PM's sights were arguably the most sensitive clauses which had been agreed, and he potentially had enemies in each.The Rhineland occupation, Clemenceau's proudest achievement perhaps, was under threat from the PM's revisionist gaze. Britons, LG claimed, would never accept the occupation. Few of his delegates would even consider it, and they would not approve of British soldiers marching into Germany to enforce the peace based on this clause. Clemenceau was apoplectic, and we know this from the conversations he shortly shared with his counterparts, but the minutes of the Council of Four remained sickly polite and familiar, as though the PM wasn't angling to tear up months of work which he had played no small role in creating.But that wasn't all - Upper Silesia would need a plebiscite, Germany must be invited into the League sooner, or perhaps instantly, and reparations must be fixed to a certain figure. These concessions, claimed Lloyd George, were the only way to fuse peace to the international order, and guarantee peace between France and Germany. That said, Lloyd George scoffed at the idea that war would return to Europe, or that Germany would pose a threat to France, for at least another 30 or 50 years. Certainly, the PM claimed, Germany and France would not be at each other's throats again in a mere 15 years, so what was Clemenceau so worried about? In fact the PM was correct, the Nazis annexed the Rhineland in 16, not 15 years, but he was bound to be wrong about virtually everything else. Whether he owned these errors or not, they threatened to undo everything which the big three had worked towards since they had first landed in Paris...***************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 46 Minutes 31 May 2019

Join me and other history friends on Flick - a great app for history friends and important conversations!My agora friends and others are going to be in New York for a special conference on 29th June - meet Mike Duncan, Kevin Stroud, David Crowther and more! Search Intelligent Speech Conference now! Use the code WDF to get 5% off your ticket!After weeks of waiting, Ulrich von Brockdorff-Rantzau finally broke radio silence on 29th May 1919, when he communicated the full extent of Germany's answer to the draft peace treaty from 7th May. And oh boy, was this communique full in its extent. Consisting of more than 100 pages, what came to be known as the German 'counterproposals' was half a document half as large as the peace treaty itself, and it packed quite a punch. Initially, it was necessary to translate the document to discover its ramifications, so it wasn't until 31st May that true consideration of it was possible for the non-German speakers. This delayed matters, and facilitated speculation among the big three over what the Germans could be after. Before long, the document would be unwrapped - the Germans, in a very roundabout way, were saying Nein.In this episode, we examine a forgotten answer to that forgotten question - that being, what did the Germans have to say about the allied draft peace treaty? So often we are presented with the simple narrative of A-B, where the treaty is presented on 7th May, and approved on 28th June. Here, we are reminded that matters were rarely if ever so simple. The Germans had been waiting on the sidelines, following the peace conference as best as they could. Now utterly depressed and disillusioned by what they had been given, the Germans started writing immediately after 7th May, and came to discover that they had an awful lot to get off their chests. The allies, technically, did not have to listen to their proposals, yet in the atmosphere of emotional post-war morality politics, the big three discovered that not only would they have to listen to these proposals, they would also have to absorb them, consider them, and mount a rely. This was a process which, it was feared, the vaunted unity of the big three up to this point might not survive...*********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 50 Minutes 29 May 2019

Join me and other history friends on Flick - a great app for history friends and important conversations!My agora friends and others are going to be in New York for a special conference on 29th June - meet Mike Duncan, Kevin Stroud, David Crowther and more! Search Intelligent Speech Conference now! Use the code WDF to get 5% off your ticket!The last few days of May 1919 were a weird time in the allied camp. Despite the fact that it was absolutely expected that Germany was about to send 'elaborate' counterproposals, which meant that Germany, therefore, would not be signalling its complete acceptance of the Peace Treaty, the big three refrained from authorising Marshal Foch to begin his preparations for war. These preparations might have turned up the heat on Germany, and demonstrated to Chancellor Scheidemann's government that the allies were serious indeed about their demand for unconditional acceptance being respected. This was a strange contradiction in the allied policy - did they not want the Germans to know they meant business? It was a strange contradiction, but it was far from the only one.Despite the need to prepare for the arrival of these anticipated counterproposals, and the necessity in maintaining allied unity at all times, the big three decided that the time was now right to gang up on Italy like never before. In a series of scathing verbal attacks on the Italian premier who was present, Clemenceau, Wilson and Lloyd George in their turn all claimed that Orlando had had no policy, that he had made no clear requests, that much had changed since 1915, that he was jeopardising the Entente, and a whole range of other ideas. We will measure the fairness of these jibes in the episode, but they typically followed by the claim that they meant Italy to feel no disrespect, and that they looked forward to solving these issues in the future.Insincere though the last minute trudgings through the Italian issues, the Austrian peace and the Russian situation might appear to us here, the big three seemed to have little else to do, while they waited with baited breath to see what the Germans would say about their peace treaty. Remember - these were supposed to be the victorious allies. Notwithstanding Germany's right to make suggestions, according to the terms of the peace, the spectre of Germany making the allies wait in line for their verdict was a bizarre one. Perhaps, the big three genuinely believed that the best course was to give diplomacy another chance, and that was why they made Foch delay his plans, which might have made a difference to the German reply. Either way, the moments which filled the diaries of the big three in the final days of May were about to build towards something incredible, and the grim waiting process seemed like the very worst part of this process.********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 33 Minutes 26 May 2019

Join me and other history friends on Flick - a great app for history friends and important conversations!My agora friends and others are going to be in New York for a special conference on 29th June - meet Mike Duncan, Kevin Stroud, David Crowther and more! Search Intelligent Speech Conference now! Use the code WDF to get 5% off your ticket!There was nothing simple about the allied policy towards Russia. The adventures of William C. Bullitt and a failed conference at Prinkipo were all the allies had to show for their attempts to fix Russia, which meant ridding the world of the Bolsheviks. Of course, the allies also had considerable forces of their own in the different Russian fronts, in the Northern theatre based at Archangel, in the South near the Crimea and in Siberia at Omsk. This latter theatre contained the base of one Admiral Alexander Kolchak, and on 26th May 1919, the finishing touches had finally been put on a document of incredible significance. The allies, it seemed, were willing to recognise Kolchak's government as THE government of Russia!This was nothing less than a declaration of war on the Bolsheviks, but if you asked Lenin, he would have said without much of an effort, that the allies were at war with the Bolsheviks anyway. The impetus behind making their pro-Kolchak policy official was the successive military triumphs of his regime. The problem was, in spite of what the big three might have thought, these triumphs were very impressive, but they had been impressive a month ago. In the space of that month, while the German treaty was handed over, the Italians were peeved and the Greeks landed, a great deal had changed. This period of change was not felt in Paris though, because the big three were steadily informed of the situation. Who supplied their information? The very faction they wished to see come out on top, Admiral Kolchak.This produced a tragic situation whereby allied help, such as it was, came far too late to make any difference. The allied recognition of Kolchak, while it was effective in bolstering the morale of him and his men, did not have much of a material impact. The allies, in other words, had moved too slowly, and not done enough, to make any difference. This was, in many respects, the story of the big three's life in the Peace Conference. In addition to their recognition of Kolchak though, the allies forwarded EIGHT demands (not seven as I say here, before going on to list eight...oops!) which Kolchak would have to adhere to if his regime was to enjoy allied support. Kolchak agreed with the terms - what did he have to lose after all, when his forces were on the backfoot, and allied help was so desperately needed? In the end, the allies treated the Russian front the same as they treated the Turkish, Eastern European, African, Middle Eastern and indeed the German front - they acted too slowly, with inadequate information, and made a giant mess in the process. We live with the consequences of their mess today, so why not have a listen and see just how much stuff you can blame the big three for today?!*********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 47 Minutes 25 May 2019

Join me and other history friends on Flick - a great app for history friends and important conversations! My agora friends and others are going to be in New York for a special conference on 29th June - meet Mike Duncan, Kevin Stroud, David Crowther and more! Search Intelligent Speech Conference now! Use the code WDF to get 5% off your ticket!By the last week of May 1919, the focus in the allied camp had switched from Italy to Germany...for the most part. It was known that the Germans would have to send a reply to the allied peace treaty soon - they had just 15 days from the moment it was handed to them to give an answer. Thus, while in the interim the big three mostly did their own thing, by the tailend of that deadline, they were beginning to seriously worry about what the Germans would actually say. What they could agree on, at least, was that this was THE peace treaty, and like it or not, Germany would have to sign. At least, that was how it seemed.It is up to me to explain then, if this resolute insistence on accepting the terms of the treaty was so dominant, why were the Germans allowed to procrastinate, and why were they even allowed to communicate counterproposals to the allies, making their own suggestions, and continuing their loud protest at the terms already agreed to. It was quite a sight – after four months of negotiation, the treaty reached by the allies was meant to be final. Yet, within two weeks of handing that treaty to the Germans, it was evident that they were not willing to accept it in its full form. What was more, as we will learn, some of the allies, and even some of the big three, had begun to get cold feet as to the nature of some of the terms. ************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 52 Minutes 25 May 2019

In episode 16 of the game, we visit four distinct scenes, where a great deal of drama goes down. Lloyd George has some words for the British Empire Delegation; four allied figures meet to try and address their differences; the Austro-German party urge action in the creation of some peace treaty which will actually end the war, and in the American delegation, the fallout from Woodrow Wilson's stroke continues to paralyse policy, as Poles and Frenchmen look on. It's an episode packed with developments, subtle hints and the consequences of previous decisions, so I hope you enjoy it! See you next time on Saturday 8th June!****************The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 54 Minutes 24 May 2019

Join me and other history friends on Flick - a great app for history friends and important conversations! My agora friends and others are going to be in New York for a special conference on 29th June - meet Mike Duncan, Kevin Stroud, David Crowther and more! Search Intelligent Speech Conference now! Use the code WDF to get 5% off your ticket!The aftermath of the Greek landing was one thing, but there was no ignoring the reception which the peace treaty received in Germany either. The Big Three, sometimes joined by Italy, worked through their to-do list between 16-19 May - by the way yes, apologies for this episode being rather late... But it's no later than the British, American and French reaction to the news of German problems with their treaty. You'll be unsurprised to learn, the Germans had problems with this draft that reached to the very core of its 440 articles, and they were loud in their expressions of disgust. They were not the only ones. Despite the grave criticisms which were leveled against the Treaty, Wilson stood firmly against them. He was, he believed, fighting the good fight, even if the end result was not perfect.The League would make things right in the world, and that was what mattered now, not the hurt feelings of the Irish, the Chinese, or especially the Italians. This latter party were the most prolific in their disappointments by far - in fact, at one point on a sunny day in mid-May, the Italians faced the full wrath of its three weary allies, who just wanted the Italians to roll over. As Vittorio Orlando knew full well though, this was not an option. He would have to hold on, to Fiume, or the Treaty of London, or whatever he could, with results that tore at the very fabric of the allied accord, but which also make for positively fascinating listening. So why not pull a chair up, make sure Italy isn't sitting on it first, and see how it was that the big four became the big three and one!*********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 47 Minutes 23 May 2019

Join me and other history friends on Flick - a great app for history friends and important conversations! My agora friends and others are going to be in New York for a special conference on 29th June - meet Mike Duncan, Kevin Stroud, David Crowther and more! Search Intelligent Speech Conference now! Use the code WDF to get 5% off your ticket!It's high time we considered the American angle once again. After several weeks of work, one would imagine that the American delegation and the American President would have their kinks all worked out by this stage, right? Unfortunately not. In fact, Woodrow Wilson faced several serious conflicts of interest and differences of opinion not only within the American delegation and the body politic back home, but also, so it seemed sometimes, from his old self. Wilson had undoubtedly been forced to compromise on several of his key ideals, and while he imagined that the League of Nations would justify these sacrifices for the sake of long term gains, there were those in his confidence that couldn't imagine allowing the President to get away with it.Whether it was his inconsistency in treating the Italians over Fiume and the Japanese over Shantung, his inability to clarify what self-determination actually meant, or his consistent faux pas with each of the allied leaders, Wilson seemed a far cry from his triumphant, visionary self by mid-May 1919. In this episode, we'll get to grips with how his contemporaries and historians since weighed in on the question of Wilson's principles, from those he was willing to cling to relentlessly, and those which he seemed to throw aside as the German peace treaty loomed into view. If you want to be clued in on the latest developments in the American side, then this installment of our project is for you!****************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 50 Minutes 19 May 2019

After so many weeks of preparation, it is finally time to journey to Warsaw where the Council for Russian Freedoms presents its mission. Accompanied by volunteer forces from all over the world, the message is clear - the extinction of Bolshevism and the rescuing of Russia. However, beneath of the surface of the good intentions and proud speeches, lurks dark rumours, doubts and further conspiracy...*****The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 63 Minutes 18 May 2019

Are you ready for this? After a long time teasing you all, it's time I dropped some incredibly exciting news on the world. This news has the potential to change history podcasting FOREVER...sort of, but first and foremost, it means big changes for you and I. I hope you'll have a listen to the first half of this show to hear my news and get to grips with what I'm all about. Pat yourself on the back and say a huge thankssss with me, for seven wonderful years of history podcasting! Who would have thought that after seven years of talking to myself, you would all still be listening! Happy birthday to us, and thankss for being the best history friends a guy could ask for [self hug]Here are the questions I cover in this episode:What’s a typical day of work for you with the show? How are you managing to do all this? What black magic are you using to make days last 48 hours etc.? How is teaching? Do you think you’ll revisit BGTW again? How do you get through sources so quickly? Do you see Sean anymore? What’s your favourite junk food? If you had one piece of advice for someone starting out in history podcasting, what would it be? What is your recording studio set up? Will you cover any examples of when diplomacy succeeds in the future? What’s a pet peeve you have with history podcasting? How do you construct your scripts for each episode? You came to the US in November 2018, what was one thing you liked and one thing you didn’t like about our country? Did you expect this series to be so massive? Most surprising fact about my research for it? What’s the weirdest error you’ve made with the project? What’s your favourite subtitle you’ve given to an episode of the series? Where do you begin with big projects like the VAP? Whose diary do you wish you had for the VAP? What are you reading right now aside from all the VAP/1956 stuff? Any books that you stopped reading out of frustration? Name and shame! What famous hair or beard style do you wish you could pull of today? Favourite female diplomatic leader? You get to ask one question to one historical figure, they must answer honestly, who will you ask and what question will you ask? What do you think of historians that allow their ideology or opinions to affect their work? For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 34 Minutes 15 May 2019

My agora friends and others are going to be in New York for a special conference on 29th June - meet Mike Duncan, Kevin Stroud, David Crowther and more! Search Intelligent Speech Conference now! Use the code WDF to get 5% off your ticket!OTD 100 years ago, the switch was finally pulled, and Greek soldiers were landed in Anatolia for the first time in centuries. The cause was the city of Smyrna, that centerpiece of Greek culture and history which, Greek premier Venizelos claimed, was eager to welcome its compatriots. Yet, the act of the landing is as fascinating as the story which led up to this event. It was a story of Hellenic romanticism, background intrigue, a selective application of self-determination, a lot of Greek pressure oh, and did I mention, a whole lot of Greek pressure.On the surface, this act seemed to be the peak of Venizelos' career. It was merely a stepping stone, potentially, for the realisation of a Greater Greek Empire which straddled the Hellespont. And yet, several problems lurked behind the curtain. Perhaps the most important elephant in the room were the Turks, who were not even considered a proper nationality by the allies. Certainly, in Venizelos' view, Turks were really just lapsed Greeks, or sometimes, they were irredeemable barbarians. Either way, Greek culture would nourish them back to civilisation, and it was only humane not to stand in their way. Yet, despite receiving the most punitive peace treaty of any vanquished power, the Turks would enjoy a resurgence, and against all odds, ignore the peace treaties handed down by the allies. They were by far the most thoroughly punished of the Central Powers, yet they were also the only member of that group to ignore the peace terms which the allies presented, and to live to tell the tale.On the other side of this crisis, loomed a reckoning between two peoples, Greek and Turkish, who had been at loggerheads for millenia. It was impossible to imagine Greeks and Turks living side by side in harmony, to the extent that, in acting to land at Smyrna, Venizelos set off a chain of events which would result in an incredibly tragic scene - the ending of centuries of Greek culture in Smyrna, in exchange for a lasting peace. It was a journey - from triumph to despair - which took fewer than five years. The aftershocks of this act were still being felt nearly four years after the First World War had officially 'ended', and believe it or not, Venizelos had a key role to play in both of these seismic chapters of Greco-Turkish history. All of it, began with a landing...***********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 47 Minutes 12 May 2019

My agora friends and others are going to be in New York for a special conference on 29th June - meet Mike Duncan, Kevin Stroud, David Crowther and more! Search Intelligent Speech Conference now!The story of Greece comes under our microscope at long last. Here we are introduced to a fascinating vision, yet another example of what might have been. Greater Greece was a project which appealed to many people outside the realm of Greece itself, and in this episode we will get to grips with the origins of the idea in Greek, but mostly in British foreign policy. It was in Britain, as we'll see, that some of the most enthusiastic supporters of an enormous Greek empire existed. This 'redeemed' Greece would expand its power and influence across the Hellespont, into Constantinople, into Anatolia, all over the Aegean, and virtually everywhere else that a smattering of Greek culture and history could said to have resided.We also recap in this episode how Greece got to this point. Greece was, in spite of what Premier Venizelos might have claimed, a very divided country by 1919. The legacy of the war, where the country had flip flopped between allied and central power supporter, had left serious scars, which only Venizelos seemed capable of keeping under control. The danger, as ever, was that Greece might unravel if it were left wanting in its claims. Another more serious danger though, which was realised too late, was what might happen if the Greeks DID get what they wanted. What would it mean for Greek and Turkish relations into the future if Greece acquired portions of Anatolia? Without due consideration of this question, the allies blundered onward with terrible naivety, pushing Greeks and Turks into a collision course, the impact of which reverberates to this day...***************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 55 Minutes 12 May 2019

The President Marshall arrives in London to take his seat alongside the big three in the Council of Eight, as a very exhausted SIR Alistair Tancred accompanies him. Awaiting Foch in London are several developments; the Minor Council continues to quarrel, the League of Nations is under severe threat, and the concerned nations prepare themselves to contribute men to the cause of Russian freedom, after a rocky start...**********The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 58 Minutes 10 May 2019

My agora friends and others are going to be in New York for a special conference on 29th June - meet Mike Duncan, Kevin Stroud, David Crowther and more! Search Intelligent Speech Conference now!Somehow, we managed to cram an hour of content in an episode that examines the 8-10 May 1919! That's because in that episode, a great deal happened which requires our attention, so sit down and relax as we talk about...Italy again??!! Well yes, but other issues too. How would the Germans respond to the peace terms? What plans did the allies have in place in the event that the Germans refused to accept? The two week deadline was ticking downwards, but considering all we've seen so far, it should be no surprise that sceptics and realists alike imagined that this two week deadline was not the final word...*******The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 32 Minutes 07 May 2019

On this day 100 years ago, the Germans were finally presented with the treaty had been under construction for nearly five full months. What would they think of it? That remained to be seen, but in the process of handing this treaty to them, the German delegation, represented by Ulrich von Brockdorff-Rantzau, would be given a chance to speak while seated, before the entirety of the plenary conference on afternoon of 7th May 1919. It was a scene which the allies had never expected to behold, but as soon as the German foreign minister began talking, two things were clear.First, despite the fact that they hadn't got the treaty in their hot little hands, the Germans had tapped into the rumours which were swirling around, and they hadn't liked at all what they had gathered. Second, and arguably more importantly though, the spectre of the German foreign minister defying the allies and their treaty went down like a lead balloon. Brockdorff-Rantzau's performance, while in content was not explosive, in style it was positively volcanic, and it shaped the attitudes of the big three towards the Germans more than ever before. If they had forgotten who the real enemy was, this scene served better than anything as a grim reminder of the task ahead.***********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 117 Minutes 05 May 2019

In our longest episode to date (and hopefully ever) we examine the incredible story of the first week of May 1919, by delving into primary sources never before used on a podcast, and rarely used in books! This delivers to us a narrative rich in detail and plainly, in length, but it is a necessary chapter to absorb in our story simply because it is so fascinating. The Italians, as is commonly known, walked out of the Peace Conference in the last week of April. Therefore, a reasonable history enthusiast might conclude that the big three would ignore them, and that they would spend more time talking about Germany instead, especially since the German delegation was present in Paris, and eagerly awaiting the moment when they would be handed that peace treaty which the allies had been working on for so many months by this point.And yet, an incredible truth of the 1-6 May 1919 is that, in spite of all of these facts which would recommend a speedy resolution of the German peace, and the conclusion of the first phase of peacemaking, the big three were utterly besotted with an apparently irrelevant issue - the Italians. That's right - contrary to what conventional pictures of the conference process tells us, the Italians were not forgotten once they left Paris. Instead, the Italians had never been so popular, as the allies worked to predict a morass of issues that concerned Rome. Would the Italians be included in the final peace? Would the Italians join the League of Nations? Would the Italians launch a pre-emptive strike at Fiume, or even Asia Minor? What should the allies do to stop them?Amidst these concerns, of course, the conference did not sit still, and the German treaty was examined in a plenary conference on the afternoon of 6th May, in a process which House called 'stupid beyond endurance.' Yet, it deserves reiterating that even by that point, the allies had yet to examine or consider the treaty in its full scope or impact. It is often noted that the big three didn't spend enough attention properly considering the full extent of their decisions. What is talked about far less, and what my research brings forward here, is the surprising answer behind these delays and misconceptions.The allies didn't pay scant regard to the eventual Treaty of Versailles because they were inherently lazy or ignorant, but because they were consumed and distracted by the long Italian shadow, which was cast over all their proceedings. Try as they might, they could not escape from the power which had abandoned them a week before. Tune in here for a story which I have never seen told; as we delve into the nitty gritty of the conference, to unveil a story that is as fascinating as it is disturbing. It's something which has to be HEARD to be believed, so if you'll join me for this two hour bonanza, I believe you'll come away with a completely different perspective on what it meant to be a peacemaker, and sit among the big three...******The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 31 Minutes 03 May 2019

The German delegation had arrived in Paris, but despite the confident exterior, Ulrich von Brockdorff-Rantzau would have known full well that all was not well back home. Germany was tottering on the edge of the abyss, and nowhere was this danger more acute than in the traditionally safe, conservative heartland of the Empire - Bavaria. What had led this second state of Germany to veer so far to the left, and so far from its old roots? Was there any hope for Bavaria, or was it destined to be another Budapest? Germans were determined that the answer should be nein, but the aftershocks of this trauma were not something that could be so easily contained...*******The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 31 Minutes 30 Apr 2019

The 30th April was a strange day. It was barely a microcosm in the grand scheme of the Paris Peace Conference, and it was wedged awkwardly between the Italian walkout and the German arrival, not to mention the madcap adventures of the drafting committee, as hundreds of overworked printers and technicians worked to get the Treaty finished within 48 hours - the intended deadline at this stage. It is little wonder that the big three were busy then - they held no fewer than FIVE meetings on the same day. What did they have to show for it by the end? Some notes taken on the Italian feelings, the confirmation of Japanese intransigence over China, and French stubbornness over Alsace-Lorraine...and that was it! If the allies continued to work without working like this for the next few days, then it didn't look good for either the drafting committee, or the Peace Conference itself. As a new month dawned, the big three seemed more sluggish than ever...***********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 24 Minutes 29 Apr 2019

At long last, the German delegation has arrived in Paris, and resides in the exact same hotel where in 1871, the French government was forced to kowtow to Bismarck. What a coincidence! Leading the delegation was Ulrich von Brockdorff-Rantzau, a Wilhelmian German official of the old order, so it seemed. Brockdorff-Rantzau was the German Foreign Minister, and was utterly determined to get what he believed was Germany's just deserts - a peace treaty based on the Fourteen Points. Anything less than that, and he was bound to be unhappy. Yet, even as the German delegation arrived, a key problem was brought out into the open - the peace treaty STILL wasn't ready! This was far from the only problem which lay in store...***********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 30 Minutes 28 Apr 2019

OTD 100 years ago, perhaps the most infamous international organisation in history was officially blessed by the plenary conference of the Paris Peace Conference. This made it essentially impossible to ignore that institution, or to fail to bake it into the final Treaty of Versailles. And so it was done. Yet, at the time, on that eventful day, and in that stuffy room where the minor and major nations debated the pros and cons of the vision, there could be no way of predicting what this League of Nations would mean. It seemed, at its core, to represent hope. In this episode, I examine that moment when it was established. To men like Wilson, who had envisioned some version of this League since he had first left the United States in late 1918, it must have seemed like a dream come true, but even at this early stage, not everyone was convinced...*******The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 52 Minutes 28 Apr 2019

As the Conference at London works towards several compromises, we tune in to some new arrivals, some storm conference scenes, and a weighted meeting between the President Marshal, Ferdinand Foch, and the delegation of British, Swiss and Spanish delegates sent to meet him. They would arrive in Foch's office uncertain of precisely what to expect, but they would leave with yet another proposal...*********The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 43 Minutes 27 Apr 2019

It's time we cleared the air about reparations and war guilt, arguably the two most controversial elements of the Treaty of Versailles. Here, making use of studies long since ignored or forgotten, we unwrap the reality of the Germans were actually faced with, what the infamous articles actually said, and why the Germans determined, rather than face their mistakes, to make up a whole load of stuff about how unfair their lot was! It's a stunning tale of propaganda and deliberate duping, and may be one of the most revealing episodes we release, so have a listen!********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 35 Minutes 26 Apr 2019

Here we take stock of the situation by the last week of April 1919 by focusing our microscope on two apparently unrelated, but hugely important issues – specifically the future of the Rhine, and the status of the city of Danzig. These two issues of the Rhineland and Danzig were intrinsically linked with the outbreak of the Second World War, and it is thus important in our narrative to establish where they came from. As we will learn here, not only did these two issues provide Hitler with different opportunities, they also represented, to Woodrow Wilson, an opportunity to send a unique message to the Italians...*********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 56 Minutes 24 Apr 2019

On 24th April 1919, Italy left the Paris Peace Conference. This stunning development was a long time coming, and was a natural result of the behaviour of the big three. Notwithstanding the justness of Italy's demands, these demands had brought her into the war, and now that it was plain the allies would not listen, Vittorio Orlando felt he had little choice other than to call the allied bluff. It was a decision that had been predicted for some time, and though they had tried to avoid this rift widening between them, no member of the big three cried for Italy. Unfortunately though, while they did not cry for Italy, the allies found they could not escape her long shadow. Orlando's victory, if it could be called that, was that Italy's smell lingered long after she had gone. The walkout was a significant development either way though, and paved the way for later disasters and misunderstandings which all served to hamper the steady flow of the conference. It's a long and winding tale, but it's one I had a great time investigating, so take a look here!*******The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 42 Minutes 23 Apr 2019

We finally turn our attention to Italy in this episode history friends, where the relationship of Vittorio Orlando with his peers in the big five comes under our microscope. What were Italy's demands? Why was Italy upset with how its interests had been received? Were these interests fair, or unjust altogether? How do we balance our innate repugnance at Italy's expansionist demands with the fair point that without those promises made to her, 500,000 of her men would still be alive, and 900,000 unwounded? It was quite a conundrum, and as the Italian government was beginning to fear, the allies were content to abandon this conundrum in favour of easier relations with the Americans. This was what the Italians feared, but they were not about to give up without a fight...*******The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 67 Minutes 22 Apr 2019

Hello dear listeners, this is a jack of all trades episode, which serves several purposes:It explains what the Suez Crisis was, and why you should be interested in it.It examined each one of the episodes, providing audio previews for most of themIt announces our Q&A episode due on 18th May - our 7th birthday, and I need your questions!It serves as a call to arms, for history friends everywhere, to support this show in whatever way you can, in the run up to that birthday.The best way to support this show monetarily is through Patreon, and while it has been said before, in this episode it is said again, just how important this financial support is, and how much of a difference you can make. In return you'll get far more than $5 gets you these days, as well as some awesome audio goodies and my eternal gratitude. Let's smash 300 patrons and make the long term of success of this show guaranteed, from just $1 a month!If you want to skip the Call to Arms in the beginning of the show, go to the timestamp of roughly 18:30, and start listening to the breakdown of the Suez Crisis series!Start supporting the show by clicking here! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 55 Minutes 20 Apr 2019

Episode 12 of the game sees our focus hone in on one eventful day, 19th April 1919, where three separate meetings were held, and where dreams were debated and dashed. The Japanese put forward their long anticipated racial equality proposal - which you will have to vote for - and the dominions made their cases before a packed plenary council meeting. With Poincare present, as the Premier of France or shill of Foch depending on your perspective, the stage was set for some memorable exchanges and weighted debates. Then, at the last moment, a bombshell was dropped which promised to dramatically alter the future of Russia, Europe and the world! From the grave, the Tiger's roar could still be heard...*******The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 72 Minutes 16 Apr 2019

You can order Tim's book here!Something very special for you indeed history friends! A mere days away from launch, the lovely Tim Bouverie joins us for a fascinating chat about his monumental book, Appeasing Hitler: Chamberlain, Churchill and the Road to War, available in all good book stores! To say this book is monumental is to do it an injustice - in fact, I would go as far as saying, if you read any book on the build up to the Second World War in your life, you must read this. Just like I have attempted to reimagine the outbreak of the Great War from Britain's perspective, so too does Tim here work hard to bring us a refreshed look at that infamous foreign policy device. But, it'd be wrong to pigeonhole his book, or this episode, as an examination of appeasement in the late 1930s.We certainly do that, but we delve deep into other matters as well - believe it or not, even the Treaty of Versailles and the Suez Crisis come up in our discussion, and how could they not? If you had the impression that appeasement was an isolated thing in British foreign policy, then you'd be wrong! Appeasement lived and died in the context of the 20th century, and lessons which were learned and which could never be forgotten shaped this century beyond measure. Appeasement was one of these lessons, and it's high time we did it justice. If you're ready to join Tim and for I for this incredible ride, then please do stop by! Remember you can track down Tim's great book here, or by going to any bookshop worth its salt. Thanksss! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 58 Minutes 14 Apr 2019

The situation in our alternative universe continues to heat up, but some might say, for the better. The President Marshall of France, Ferdinand Foch, having survived the recent vote, now has his regime confirmed, but not all delegates have to like it. Foch's regime was buoyed by several successes over the last week, including one development in particular which will leave some delegates happy, and some furious - that, I'm afraid, is the nature of the Game! Remember, get scheming if you want to resolve this situation; change your character if you feel like your situation is hopeless, or change your perceptions altogether and work for a better peace for this world (yeah, right!). Either way, remember that if you want to play the delegation game and shape this world, you need only sign up for $6 a month! We cannot guarantee you a warm reception, but since the delegates involved only have three months left to make this final treaty, we can guarantee that you will be very busy indeed!***********The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 21 Minutes 11 Apr 2019

The Japanese were utterly determined to pass the racial equality proposal, which actually consisted of a few sentences that would be inserted into the preamble of the League of Nations. This had been their for weeks, and it was publicly known, and feared, by much of the allies, with the exception perhaps of France. Neither the Americans nor the British could afford to accept this proposal, which was akin to political dynamite in 1919. However, the stories behind precisely why neither side could accept the Japanese approach were very different indeed. Either way, Edward House was determined that his President should not have to take the fall...********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 34 Minutes 08 Apr 2019

It's high time we turned our attention to a neglected theatre of this story. No, not Africa...No, not the Middle East...Yes, that's right - Asian! Well, more specifically, just Japan! The story of the Japanese rise to power in the late 19th and early 20th century is one which has always fascinated us here at WDF, but in the context of the Paris Peace Conference, the story becomes more interesting still! The Japanese, clearly maligned due to their lack of European-ness, were nonetheless keen to play a prominent role in the proceedings, and yet the demands which they presented represented nothing short of dynamite for a conference already rocked by a succession of scandals...**********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 50 Minutes 06 Apr 2019

After a traumatic event which rocked France, the world and the Peace Conference to its core, how can the delegates involved possibly refocus their attentions to the task at hand - that of making peace? Fear not, the President-Marshall of France is on the case, and with his ambitious, but by no means impossible 16 Points, the hero of France's war effort attempts to become the hero of the peace conference, and to rebuild the peacemaking efforts of all those now knuckling down in the Anna-Bay Hotel, London...***********The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 40 Minutes 05 Apr 2019

In the first week of April, 1919, American President Woodrow Wilson had reached the end of his tether. He was eternally sick of Georges Clemenceau lording the agonies of France over his head - what he needed was compromise, not to be accused of being pro-German by the French premier in one particularly explosive meeting. The rift between American and French leaders had arrived at long last, but it was hardly likely to be a fight either man would benefit from. Amidst a terrible illness, Wilson declared his intention to return to the United States, and requested his boat prepare itself at Brest. This was too much for Clemenceau, who backtracked, and was even somewhat nice to Wilson in the French press. Yet this was a Pyrrhic victory if there ever was one - Wilson was worn out and ill from the bust up, and further afield, it was becoming clear that France and America were by no means the only issue of concern which the creaking Council of Four would have to deal...************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 57 Minutes 03 Apr 2019

Whoa, Nelly, have we got a story for you! In the aftermath of failed efforts to achieve satisfaction with reparations and with the intervention into Russia, one could be left feeling sorry themselves if you happened to be a delegate in this fictional version of Paris in late March 1919. However, the real movements were coming not from the halls of peace, but out on the streets and in the devious minds of disaffected leaders and citizens, determined to right by France...no matter who stood in the way!***********The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 46 Minutes 31 Mar 2019

We return to the question of reparations with some startling revelations. If you thought the French were the greedy, grasping and bitter sponsors of a massive reparations bill, then prepare to question everything you know! It was not the French, but the politically trapped British PM David Lloyd George, who was in fact the loudest and most inconsistent advocate of a high bill. Why? That question has puzzled those historians who have attempted to answer it, but in this episode we're going to our best. Why was Lloyd George so eager for a large payment? Why was he giving his peers moderate advice one moment, only to come down harshly the next? Was he constrained by political promises, or did he genuinely intend to punish the Germans out of a deep seated belief in the rightness of his cause? Tune in here to find out the truth...**********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 41 Minutes 27 Mar 2019

At long last, we turn our attention to the controversial issue of reparations. Perhaps no issue at the Paris Peace Conference, and no single tenet of the Treaty of Versailles has been the source of as much controversy as the question of how much Germany should pay to answer for its crimes of launching the Great War, yet in this first of an unofficial two-parter, we will learn that the conventional narrative of reparations is very far removed indeed from the reality. The eternal wisdom of John Maynard Keynes, we will discover, was far from so universal as historians have come to believe, and our impression of where the peacemakers went wrong and who was to blame over the reparations question is, I will explain, unfairly and unjustly skewed. It's time to set the record straight, or as straight as we can make it, so if you're eager for a revisionist take on 1919's most controversial question, look no further than our 50th episode!**********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 52 Minutes 23 Mar 2019

After a week of conspiracy and controversy, the fallout must be confronted. An exhausted and demoralised cast of delegates are challenged with creating some kind of policy approach to Russia, to listening to one another without going crazy, and with remaining wary at all times of former enemies, or should that be former friends? Regardless of what they planned to do in the future, there could be no denying that what they had done in the past had left Paris a haunted shell of its former self. The question remained to be answered - would it all be worth it in the end?************The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 46 Minutes 21 Mar 2019

A century ago today, Budapest was circling the drain of revolution, after several months of Bolshevik infiltration and grand promises, combined with mounting frustrations over President Mihaly Karolyi's consistent failings. What was to be done about the situation in Hungary? Where a population was so desperate to realise their dream of independence after four centuries under Habsburg rule? The allies had no idea, and paid Hungary barely any attention. While the peacemakers in Paris dallied, the Hungarians refused to sit still. If no one would listen then they would shock the world, and bring in only the second Bolshevik country in the world. By doing so, some Hungarians imagined that they would be able to take what was rightfully theirs. In fact, they doomed their country to suffer. Not only was Hungary now a defeated member of the Central Powers, it was now *shudder* a dangerous, Bolshevik, communist state, and had to be contained at all costs. It was a journey which began with Bela Kun, and ended with the terrible Treaty of Trianon a year later, but the story is set up here, so why not have a listen to how the forgotten vanquished power of Hungary fared in spring 1919?**********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 37 Minutes 21 Mar 2019

Check out the collaboration I did with Thom Daly, where we talked about Ireland and Brexit!As the Paris Peace Conference welcomed back the American President and the Big Three began to entrench themselves once more into the familiar grind, it became clear that much had changed. Rather than move further away from each other, it was fortunate indeed that the allied leaders determined to double down on their efforts to foster cooperation by gathering together for a new kind of meeting – the first assembly of the Council of Four. For the next few months, the meeting synonymous with personable allied meetings, great progress and large egos would dominate the halls of Paris. Yet, in this episode, as we’ll see, the meeting had humble beginnings, and its results hardly suggested that the allies were onto a winning formula. Within this show, we will also draw on the observations provided by House, to build a picture of an allied front which contained no end of problems, but a reassuring determination nonetheless to push through these difficulties, and create a new world order on the other side which all could be proud of. It was the end of an old phase of the conference, and the beginning of something brand new…*************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 47 Minutes 16 Mar 2019

Episode 7 of the game analyses the events surrounding the shocking murder of Georges Clemenceau, and the return of the American President to the scene. How will the President cope with the new atmosphere of cooperation, facilitated by Roosevelt's help and support, when he couldn't stand the man? How will France cope with its shattering loss of the father of victory? What other schemes were ongoing? How did a Pole sneakily dodging between several delegations fit into proceedings? All this and much more going on in the latest episode - thankssss for listening, and thanksss especially for playing!*************The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 29 Minutes 14 Mar 2019

After a month back home in the States, it was high time Woodrow Wilson returned to face the music in Paris. Exactly what tune this music would contain varied depending on whom you asked. Would Wilson find support in the leaders of the free world, or would he find only opportunists instead? What kind of impact upon the negotiations would be had by the Republican Party openly condemning his League Covenant, and insisting upon particular changes? Now that they knew he needed these four key changes to the League in order to proceed, could Georges Clemenceau, Lloyd George or Orlando be expected to be generous, or would they use their knowledge of Wilson's new weakness against him?Regarding Wilson, he was looking a wee bit tired after that adventure back home - had it all been a waste of time? And what was up between the President and his friend the Colonel, who had truly held the fort for him while he had been gone? All these questions and so many more were in need of attention, as Wilson returned to Paris on 13th March 1919. This time, the adoring crowds would be somewhat smaller, and far less adoring...**************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 94 Minutes 13 Mar 2019

Our largest episode yet, with an absolute legion of things to get through... it must be the first two weeks of March, 1919! Herein we see several things go down in the Council of Ten, which was still shorn of its major leaders, but which did not sit still nonetheless. The Italians get antsy over some bad Serbian behaviour, everyone gets antsy about the Germans and their army, Lloyd George returns and makes people antsy! Everyone is getting antsy, but some important work was also being done in the background, as the clock ticked down to the time when Woodrow Wilson would return, and the next phase of the Paris Peace Conference would begin...Big detailed episodes like these come to you all courtesy of the lovely patrons this podcast has, so make sure to thank them out loud right this second! And if you feel like joining the greatest group of history friends this side of audio, you know where to go and where we'll be! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 31 Minutes 09 Mar 2019

In episode 45 of the Versailles Anniversary Project, we examine the lesser known mission of William C. Bullitt, Philadelphia aristocrat and Ivy League prodigy – at least according to his mother – who was selected to lead a top secret American delegation to Soviet Russia. Bullitt’s aims were multi-layered, and he didn’t quite understand the limits of this mission or of his own capabilities, but that won’t stop us analysing the fortunes of this very interesting statesman. Bullitt would find a Russia starving and demoralised, yet he couldn’t help but be impressed by Lenin or by the potential of this regime.Return the food and withdraw the soldiers, Bullitt believed, and the Russian people would eject the more extreme Bolsheviks, and the West wouldn’t have to lift a finger. When Bullitt returned to Paris with these incredibly optimistic ideas, he found that everything had changed in the two and a half weeks since he had been gone. Compromise and Bolshevism were now impossible partners, and Bullitt himself had become persona non-grata in the allied consciousness. Bullitt, predictably enough, did not take this change in circumstances well…**********************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 47 Minutes 07 Mar 2019

In our latest episode, we introduce you to the revolutionary wasteland that was Russia in 1919. Russia was a very confusing place at this time, because it was the subject of a lot of debate regarding that key question – should the allies launch some kind of military expedition against the Bolsheviks? That apparently simple question was complicated by the fact that the allies already had forces in different corners of Russia – 180,000 soldiers in total. How had they gotten here, why were they here, and if allied disunity over Russia’s future was the order of the day, then why hadn't they simply been allowed to return home?These questions were all difficult to answer, but as we will learn in this episode, understanding Russia is impossible unless we first get to grips with the context of 1919 Russia, and the impact which the closing months of the Great War had had on the psyche of all sides. Different factions in Russia were a dime a dozen, with Siberia, Crimean, Ukrainian, Caucasian and Far Northern fronts, among others, but the Bolsheviks had one key advantage over all of these separated foes – they were not separated, they were more united in vision and purpose than these White factions could ever claim to be. Worldwide revolution, though it had lost some of its shine, had lost none of its edge, and Lenin still very much intended to unleash this nightmare on the Western world.************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 20 Minutes 06 Mar 2019

Before we delve into the Russian situation, I felt it would be beneficial, and darkly interesting, to examine what was happening in between the lands caught in the middle of the Russian and German crises. The Freikorps - disgruntled, right wing, extremist former soldiers and civilians, was exactly the wrong ingredient to help heal a fractured portion of the continent. Yet, unable to accept that their war was over, and determined to leave a mark upon the region and expand their fatherland, these men launched a campaign of utter ruthlessness for much of 1919. In this episode we examine it, as best as we can, before we set our sights firmly on Bolshevik Russia... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 59 Minutes 02 Mar 2019

The unofficial second parter to our examination of Woodrow Wilson's campaign to get the League of Nations approved of back home, in episode 42 we further our analysis of the different parties and their interests in the US. Who was in favour of the League, who wanted the League with some adjustments, and who was resolutely opposed to it no matter what? Where did Henry Cabot Lodge fit into this sliding scale, and when he released his Reservations document to Congress on 28th February - wherein he underline 14 problems he had with the League as it stood - what was his end goal? Did he genuinely want the League to be improved, or, for political reasons, as well as some surprising other ones, did he want it to fail completely, and never see the light of day?As an Irish historian examining such a contentious period of American history, I must say I really had a ball in this episode, and I hope you enjoy this very important detour from our Versailles narrative. The tale of Wilson's failure forms a large part of what made the Treaty of Versailles, the League of Nations and the Paris Peace Conference generally such a tragic but also such a fascinating story. It is one which requires detours like these to fully grasp, so I hope you'll join me as we jump headlong into American politics once again...*********************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 51 Minutes 02 Mar 2019

In the aftermath of Woodrow Wilson's exit from Paris, along with the British and Italian premiers, Clemenceau was alone to hold the fort against a resurgent and empowered German delegation. It was at that moment that an anarchist's bullet felled the Tiger, which provided an unprecedented opportunity for the Germans to fill this newly emerged power vacuum. This development, as we will discover, will have profound consequences for all the delegates going forward... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 79 Minutes 28 Feb 2019

The last two weeks of February 1919 were awash with legions of issues, hurt feelings, long winded speeches and too many other details to possibly count. We've already seen the period from the point of view of Harold Nicolson, but was it any better of an experience for those that were actually empowered to act? Hint - not really, but to truly unpack all that this whopper episode has to offer, you must delve into it yourself! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 42 Minutes 23 Feb 2019

Spare a thought for poor old Harold Nicolson...Mr Nicolson was a senior clerk in the British Foreign Office, and by mid-February 1919, he had already had his patience strained and his grand ambitions challenged. What lay ahead of this man once the American President departed for the US is a story not often told - the human tale. Here we hear it all and lay it bare. Between the period of 19th February and 9th March 1919, this clerk was busier than he had ever been in his life, sitting in primarily on the Greek and Czech Committees, but he was not just a busy man, he was also a disillusioned man.From consulting Nicolson's diary we can see clear as day the sheer exhaustion and frustration with the whole process begin to take root and then take over. Nicolson would lash out at Czech delegates, he would work until the sun came up, and then he would return to his desk only to find that the Foreign Office had delivered the latest boxes of papers for him to sift through. It was a job which no man could do for long, but thanks to the record which Nicolson provides, the Paris Peace Conference looms into view and we can see it for what it really was - a great idea on paper, but one which was disastrously executed. Though he was only one clerk among many, one could imagine that if an expert like Nicolson was feeling the strain, his colleagues would be feeling it too...To access the Foreign Relations of the US papers which I allude to in this episode, which provides the minutes for the Council of Ten from 15 Feb-14th March and beyond, follow this link: https://history.state.gov/historicaldocuments/frus1919Parisv04*****************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 17 Minutes 19 Feb 2019

Today in history, a deranged assailant attacked the father of victory, plunging France and all of Europe into a panic, and setting off the next phase of the Paris Peace Conference... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 42 Minutes 17 Feb 2019

Today we bravely venture to where this podcast normally steers clear - American politics. This is an essential trip though, because we must examine what happened in the US once the President returned there to present his League between 20 February and 8 March 1919. This period was spent campaigning for the new world order which Wilson so desperately wanted, and which he had fought for in person in Paris for a month. Yet, underneath the surface, and even underneath the open opposition which Republicans and Democrats alike mounted against his vision, there were other issues which Wilson had brought upon himself, and others which have since been laid at his feet regardless of fault. It was an immensely challenging time, and would ultimately come to be known the unsuccessful sequel to the Paris Peace Conference - the Treaty Fight...*************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 61 Minutes 16 Feb 2019

Oh boy, this is gonna be a good one! Episode 5 of the Delegation Game examines the aftermath of some pretty important deals which were passed, by hook or by crook, and which now challenge those present in Paris to adapt. The League of Nations Charter is the most significant of these, and in this very eventful, chunky episode, we examine the perspective of the King of the Belgians, Albert I, who was selected to chair this meeting according to the League's Charter. What's that? Woodrow Wilson wasn't selected? Well now, the President won't be happy about that will he? Within are additional alternative history developments, as the Germans shock the world by becoming accredited delegates in the Council of Ten, the French have a fit, and Dinglebrush Dinglebrushes...*************The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 36 Minutes 14 Feb 2019

OTD in history 100 years ago – the League of Nations was given a covenant, stamped and signed with seals of approval from all the attending allied powers that had taken so long to reach this decision. The first two weeks of February 1919 had indeed been eventful and exhausting for many, but this here was the first piece of true, genuine progress that had been reached. It was Woodrow Wilson’s greatest achievement, and it was also the culmination of several days of very intense meetings, not to mention a mountain of paperwork.The dreamers, schemers and idealogues that had crafted the covenant all deserved mention, but on this day in history a century ago, before a packed audience in Quai d’Orsay, it was the American President and he alone that became its figurehead. Perhaps, when one looked deeper though, they could detect an element of anxiety on the part of Wilson. It had been created, but now it would have to be defended, before a suspicious and frustrated series of audiences back home in the United States. The real question then remained not how had it been done, per se, but could it be preserved after Wilson presented his baby to Congress. Spoiler – Wilson had another series of intensive weeks ahead of him.*************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 31 Minutes 12 Feb 2019

Gathering together on 12th February, time was of the essence, a fact which had certainly been relevant before, but which the allies had still somehow managed to essentially ignore. On this day though, the allies could not ignore the fact that Germany was a sticky situation, one which was so sticky in fact, that they would still be dealing with the core question several months later. How could the allies simultaneously do everything which the conference demanded of them while also disarming Germany, or even determining the extent to which she should be disarmed? It was an immensely difficult balancing act, yet it was very important to get it right, because if the allies didn’t disarm Germany soon, they would be swamped with expenses relating to maintaining so many soldiers at once, most of whom remained idle.A solution was supposed to be at hand, because the allies had actually worked to create a committee whose task was to devise these military terms. Yet, this committee was not able to bring anything revolutionary to the table, as the allies learned for themselves this afternoon 100 years ago. Thus, in the absence of time, and with the severe pressures weighing down on them, the allies decided that in order to give Germany the attention to detail it required, yet another committee would be required. Seriously though, this time, their committee would actually do stuff – it would be empowered to act independently of the Council of Ten and its terms for Germany could be imagined without the constant intervention of the American President, who was about to go on a considerable vacation himself. Facing into this administrative abyss, it was only sensible that some delegating be done, but it remained to be seen how, when under the pressures of detail and time, the allies would actually reach a settlement that pleased everyone and achieved their goals. They better hurry, because the next day would be all about another issue altogether – the League of Nations…******************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 35 Minutes 11 Feb 2019

You know the story of 'plucky little Belgium', but what about the Belgium after the war? After all they had been through, facing the might of the German Army in its initial unrelenting phase, Belgium had unquestionably been through the ringer. The question was though, what would the Belgian Foreign Minister Paul Hymans now ask for in return? The answer to that question was more incredible - read, ridiculous - than any of the allies could have imagined. As Hymans put forward his laundry list of demands, with no thought for how Belgium's neighbours would be compensated, visions of disaster were pouring forth from French strategists.Linking the Low Countries and France together was essential, it was said, if this war was to be avoided in the future. The guilty Germans would certainly try again if they sniffed any hints of weakness in the west, but what of the innocents, innocents like Belgium, who had been caught up in the midst of this Franco-German enmity, and been utterly destroyed? In return for this ordeal, Paul Hymans would demand a high price, but neither his aims nor the eerily prophetic French fears could ever be humoured to the extent that either party felt was deserved.This, of course, was the nature of the Peace Conference. Using detailed secondary sources and the actual minutes of the meetings where the Belgian Foreign Minister poured out his heart, I am privileged to be able to bring this story to you now. The allies had to listen to the naive Belgian ramble, but whether they would actually heed his warnings or accede to his demands was another story altogether, and it's a story which is well worth your time!*********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 36 Minutes 10 Feb 2019

The latest episode of the project hones in on three specific days – the 8, 9 and 10 of February 1919, as we build up to the moment when David Lloyd George and Woodrow Wilson returned home for various reasons. Both figures had a lot on their mind even before they had left, but before the American President could return home, he would at least have to face the full brunt of the paranoid French in action. At least, they seemed paranoid enough to him. The French demands, and the insistence that the Germans intended at any moment to avenge themselves upon allied divisions or weaknesses, struck Wilson as extremely far-fetched. Not for the first or for the last time, the American President was rubbed the wrong way by French severity towards Germany. Wilson didn’t understand this extreme angle of Clemenceau, but then, how could he, since America had not been invaded by its neighbour two times in as many generations.If this episode’s purpose could be summarised in four words, then it would read ‘Clemenceau’s battle with Germany.’ It was impossible, Clemenceau insisted, to leave Germany to her own devices. He was not interested in anything – not the League of Nations, not mandates, not Russia – so long as Germany remained unresolved as a problem. Clemenceau imagined that as soon as the final peace treaty was concluded, the British and Americans would leave the French to face their adversary alone. To guard against this, Clemenceau planned to drive a hard bargain in four key areas with respect to Germany – in the case of the Rhineland, the industrial Saarland, Germany’s eastern border and on the question of reparations. To Clemenceau it was vital that these matters were worked out in France’s favour, but he came up constantly against the resistance of the American President. The honeymoon period between Premier and President certainly appeared to be over, yet there was much work still to be done…***********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 51 Minutes 09 Feb 2019

The latest instalment of the game sees everyone feeling somewhat traumatised from the massacre at the Hotel Twamley, but the show must go on! Schemes were afoot even as the Canadian Premier delivered a eulogy for his late great friend, and as the Russian delegate, Alexander Kerensky, worked to find his footing in such hostile circumstances, he found that potential allies and rivals were all around him in equal measure. Amidst the chaos and hopelessness, Kerensky would happen upon some unlikely allies, who had plans even more ambitious and grand than one could have possibly imagined...***************The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 41 Minutes 08 Feb 2019

In episode 33, we assess the day of 7th February, where the allies attempted to respond to what the Germans had done the previous day of 6th Feb, when the Constituent Assembly gathered in Weimar. The only problem with this allied approach was that no single man knew what exactly was happening in Germany. They were armed only with vague ideas and preconceived notions, and certainly no practical solutions. The French offered venom and wrath, the British caution, the Americans sympathy. It was impossible to decide upon the future either of Germany or the peace conference as a whole when everything seemed to be in flux, but this would not stop the allies from trying their best.As talk of Germany continued, so did plans for creating the ideal version of the League of Nations. After being presented only the previous week, a commission had gotten to work sorting through the difficulties and disagreements, which were unfortunately legion. The French, much like in the case of the German question, posed the most problems in the League discussion. But was this fair to blame the French? Could we instead be more justified in blaming the American President? Was Woodrow Wilson to blame for failing to delegate, and for viewing the creation of the League as his one truly important purpose? As we will learn here, the consensus is not present on any of these questions, because the truth is far from so simple…***********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 43 Minutes 06 Feb 2019

The Weimar Assembly convened on this day 100 years ago, beginning a process which contained so much high hopes and ambitions for Germany's first flirtation with democracy. Between February 1919 and June 1920, Germany would be in flux as a new constitution was developed, governments came and went, and Friedrich Ebert stood above them all...***************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 51 Minutes 05 Feb 2019

What happens when the Czechs, Romanians and Yugoslavs all try to make their voices heard, as the Big Five attempt to do their best to seem interested? What you get is this episode! A deliciously detailed examination of each of the cases made by the individual national leaders, in addition to a curious detour where we look at maps could be fudged to suit an argument! All this and more in your latest episode of the Versailles Anniversary Project!***********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 59 Minutes 03 Feb 2019

Poland's experience at the Paris Peace Conference contained its fair share of ups and downs, and nowhere was this more apparent in the early phases of the conference when its case was first presented. Poland was facing into a power vacuum and with that came great opportunities, but also grave challenges. How could Poland balance the rivalry of its major figures, Paderewski, Pilsudski and Dmowski? How could Poles balance the rivalry of its neighbours? Could Poland push back Bolshevism? Could Europe be persuaded to see things Poland's way, or was there little chance of Poland ever getting what it wanted, so long as people like David Lloyd George remained so utterly opposed to the realisation of her national ambition? Have a listen here to find out all these answers, and be introduced to the Polish case like never before...***************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 53 Minutes 02 Feb 2019

As the Hotel Twamley fills with guests, nobody could have imagined what happened next. A combination of factors, certainly not aided by the strong drink on tap, led to an explosion the likes of which Paris had never seen before, or imagined possible. The consequences would be fatal, but also had the effect of changing the narrative, and making compromise more palatable to some of the more stubborn delegates. From the most tragic of events did the greatest triumphs seem to emerge...*********The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 48 Minutes 30 Jan 2019

VERSAILLES_EPISODE_29_OUT_NOW!On this day 100 years ago, the world was getting to grips with the concept of mandates, also known as Empire 2.0. Several different opinions existed regarding the concept, but something which was becoming increasingly obvious was that Woodrow Wilson wanted to wait before defining it, until the League of Nations was good and ready, David Lloyd George wanted to get on with things and at least make provisional decisions, and Georges Clemenceau sat awkwardly in the middle.Everyone wanted on the one hand to give their loud approval of the concept, while at the same time demonstrating why mandates couldn’t possibly apply to them. New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, France – everyone had ideas about what a mandate would look like and why direct annexation was better. Lloyd George for his part believed that everyone had best get on with things, but it wasn’t long before the Big Three were in loggerheads, while everyone pretty much ignored poor old Vittorio Orlando. Another day meant another set of meetings, but while the 30th January 1919 was a day where mandates were clarified to their greatest extent yet, it was another classic case of kicking the can down the road. This left everyone free to take what they wanted from this new concept; a mandate, indeed could be anything you wanted it to be – it could be an empire in all but name…**************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 45 Minutes 27 Jan 2019

In our 28th installment, we attempt to explain mandates - that surprisingly elusive concept which it was the task of those assembled in Paris to understand. Once they understood it and got to grips with how mandates would fit into the international system, it was hoped that then, this new mandates system would usher in a new era of freedom and prosperity for the formerly colonial peoples...but not all formerly colonial peoples...just those of the vanquished powers.In a prime example of 'one rule for me and one rule for everyone else', the victorious allies insisted that they had ruled their territories as benevolent actors more interested in the well-being and fortunes of their subjects than in imperial prestige, markets or resources. All assembled would trip over themselves on the 27 and 28 January in a bid to portray their rule as that which had benefited the colonies. Furthermore, on the basis of this idea that their record spoke for itself, the allies argued that mandates were not really necessary in many cases, because the world could trust them to directly rule the former colonies of Germany and the Ottoman Empire.Convinced or not, what these powers neglected to do with much effect or conviction was actually DEFINE what a mandate was, and what role or future it would have in the new international system. The grab for spoils, it seemed, dominated the imaginations of the allies and their dominions. Was this a new era, or was it simply more of the same? The jury might have been absent, but the ambition to rule certainly was not...*******************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 52 Minutes 25 Jan 2019

Maybe following the REAL story of Versailles makes you feel glum. If so, why not follow a different tale - that of 37 delegates doing their part to have their own way and achieve their goals...by making a really big historical mess! As the League of Nations stood ready for presenting to the Plenary Conference in Paris, there was much going on in the Hotel Twamley...In the second episode the DG, we follow the fate of Lloyd George, as he attempted to confront the man responsible for imagining a proposal for devolved government in Ireland. What awaited the British Prime Minister when he met with Joseph Doherty face to face was a scene which was nothing like what Lloyd George had expected. He was out of his element, and he was at a loss, but perhaps there was silver lining?As the PM worked through this difficult experience, the Intermarium Free Trade Agreement was causing a great deal of controversy among those nations who felt overlooked or disadvantaged because of it. The Polish, Italian, Greek, Hungarian and Russian delegates had found success in this proposal, but the mission for defending it had the potential to unite all their enemies against them. The test was just about to begin...**********The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 35 Minutes 25 Jan 2019

ON_THIS_DAY_IN_HISTORY - 25TH JANUARY 1919The first steps of the League of Nations were taken on this day a century ago, as the world learned exactly what Woodrow Wilson's idea meant for them and the future relations of so many states. What kind of principles would be adhered to, and which ones would be abandoned? How could Wilson traverse the objections, cynicism and scepticism of his friends and rivals? What did other people who were present at the time have to say about this second plenary conference?Considering the fact that the world had been welcomed to Paris, it was strange indeed that this was only the second time that all of its inhabitants had been welcomed together at once, but they were not here to debate or change Wilson's mind, only to listen and hopefully approve. This was the president's dream, and as far as was concerned only HE was qualified to make this dream a reality...***************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 65 Minutes 24 Jan 2019

Before the League of Nations could be presented to the world, it was necessary to build up to that great and seismic event by examining...Russia? That didn't sound quite right, and yet the Council of Ten or Supreme Council worked through the 20-24 January as though the League of Extraordinary Nations which they were about to chair was weeks, rather than days away. In these circumstances, how could a coherent proposal for reimagining international relations be prepared on time? Mercifully, the committees were on the case, but this didn't mean that matters would proceed at all smoothly...************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 38 Minutes 21 Jan 2019

The Irish problem had not solved itself. Ever since the aftermath of the 1916 Rising, the neighbouring island had provided troubling signs of a future catastrophe, and with the proclamation of the Dáil or Irish assembly coinciding with an attack launched on Royal Irish Constabulary policemen, the catastrophe seemed to have arrived. The conflict which followed did not erupt evenly across the island. Instead it took the form of several ripples; a murder here, a robbery there, a high profile assassination somewhere in between.It was however, an unmistakable fact that Ireland was becoming more volatile. With the political mandate vested in Sinn Fein, violent Irish nationalism had reached a level of popularity and acceptance previously unknown, and this in turn meant that Britain faced an island mobilised more completely against her occupation and domination than ever before. Such facts were painfully awkward at a time when David Lloyd George was attempting to cast British rule as benevolent and civilising, as a force for good and as a facilitator of self-determination movements across the globe. Why, critics could ask, was London then ignoring its closest neighbours, in their quest to attain independent self-rule?These questions and so many more were etched into what became, by the summer of 1919, the Irish War of Independence, but the opening shots, in politics and on the battlefield, were fired on this day 100 years ago, when Ireland launched its bid for independence on a scale and with a passion never before seen or imagined possible...*****The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 44 Minutes 18 Jan 2019

Welcome delegates, to the first proper episode of the Delegation Game! Here we see everyone in the few hours before the plenary conference opened, and the Paris Peace Conference as we know it began. There was much to do, there was scheming aplenty and a great deal of opportunistic handshaking going on, as the delegations and the lonely delegates alike scoped out Hotel Twamley which would host them for the next six months. I am so incredibly excited and proud to present this to you guys - an idea which began around the time of the Armistice in November has ballooned in size and scope, to the point that I can now count 33 delegates, a number which is only set to increase as we go on. For those that have signed up and are playing the game, thanks so much for making this idea of mine a reality. For those that have yet to sign up, I hope this episode will indicate what's in store for you - absolutely every person that is mention here is played by a real person, and the negotiations continue in the Facebook group and the innumerable chat groups which await your presence!There is far too much going on here to list in detail, but if you want to learn more about what's going on, who is who and where their goals might lead, make sure and access the section of our website where we deal exclusively with the Delegation Game. For more information please don't hesitate to contact me through the usual channels!******************The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 26 Minutes 18 Jan 2019

OTD IN HISTORY - 18TH JANUARY 1919 - THE PEACE CONFERENCE OPENS!We finally made it, to the point of a new beginning for the world, in the war torn locations where so many foreign faces were travelling, and upon which so much hope had been places. There was a lot riding on the Paris Peace Conference, and those present on its very first plenary session, attended by all delegates then available in Paris, and a gigantic press corps, could not hide their excitement or positivity.It seemed as though anything was possible, with the world assembled here, to make a better peace for a better world. How could any power present deny the importance of peace? How could any power deny the importance of new institutions to safeguard the peace of the world like the League of Nations? Surely, only the wicked, the cynical, the deceitful, would dare ruin this goal of all civilised nations? Surely cooperation would be easily gained for the grandest of Woodrow Wilson's plans? Surely the world would not be let down by selfishness or fail to realise its potential?But the pragmatists knew better. They knew better because they had seen the true extent of the problems, some impossibly complex, others straightforward but no less intractable. Even those that had attended the previous week's meetings knew that arriving at consensus was not going to be as easy as they may have initially expected. But they were here, and they were eager to forge a lasting peace. The will and the intelligence was present, and the moment of truth had arrived, to put these qualities to their ultimate test...***************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 49 Minutes 15 Jan 2019

I am SO EXCITED to bring you all this episode. This is exactly what this project is all about - a comprehensive examination of primary sources, left to us by those that were in place and charged with TAKING charge a century ago. Here we cover the period of 13-17 January 1919, using the minutes of the Paris Peace Conference, provided by the US Foreign Relations papers series as our guide. I am super keen to hear what you all thought, but read on if you want to know more about this very chunky episode before you get started...By 15th January 1919, everyone of importance had arrived, but there was much work to be done before this world summit could open. In#23, we examine this body of work which preceded the official opening of the Paris Peace Conference. Join us as we drift between the major characters, assessing the major concerns of each, and the ways in which their aims created controversy and friction with their counterparts. It was not an easy task to make everyone feel on the same page, and the list of issues which each day threw up are too numerous to go into sufficient detail here. Suffice to say, in this episode, a whole range of problems come under our microscope, at the centre of them was Germany.Germany was the defeated power, yet she was not conquered. She was beaten, yet she could not be aggressively punished. She had been the enemy, yet the allies knew they would have to provide food for her people, otherwise a more sinister force would overthrow the fledgling German democracy before it had even left the cradle. This force was Bolshevism, moving like a torrent from the east, and the conflict reigned between those that feared pushing Germans too hard would occasion their succumbing to Bolshevism, and those that reasoned, whatever happened, the Germans had to be made to pay. The tension between these two viewpoints grew only larger as the difference in opinion became greater, and this all before the Conference had officially opened.But, then again, what was this Conference? Was it a preliminary, inter-allied gathering, designed to formulate the main terms of the peace treaty, which would then be left in the hands of minor diplomats to hammer out? Other questions abounded - what form of censorship should be used, did they need another committee? What would the official language of the Conference be? French, or English, or French and English? Why not Italian and Japanese then as well? How large should each of the smaller power's delegations be, and did the dominions have to have delegates since Britain could speak for them? Could Britain actually speak for them, or was the Empire, now the Commonwealth, past that point of deference to the mother country?The week preceding the official opening of the Conference, in short, threw up just as many questions, if not more, than answers. But one thing which was certain was that this Conference would remain in place in Paris, near the Palace of Versailles where the Supreme War Council had met in months past. Furthermore, a Supreme Council or Council of Ten would sit, composed of the premier and Foreign Minister of each of the five major powers (USA, UK, France, Italy and Japan) and this group would make executive decisions, guided by the appointed President of the Council, Georges Clemenceau. Administration and organisation were surely the intended goals of the week before the 18th January, but instead, this was for many the week when the scales began to fall from their eyes, and they began to come to terms with the sheer size of the challenge which loomed before them...******************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 36 Minutes 12 Jan 2019

ON_THIS_DAY_IN_HISTORY - 12th January 1919 - David Lloyd George arrives in Paris for the preliminary peace talks.Before the Paris Peace Conference opened, it was important for all sides to meet and talk together. As all three men spoke English well, Wilson, Clemenceau and Lloyd George could be expected to do the bulk of the negotiating personally. However, the initial set up of the Conference did not allow this personal arrangement, so the three men took advantage of that precious week before the conference officially opened, during the preliminaries, to build relationships, wrest concessions and have a ramble around the French capital.The arrival of the British PM on 12 January kicked the preliminaries into high gear, and from the beginning, it became clear that everyone had travelled to Paris with a degree of optimism, but also with their own aims and ambitions. The Italians, as well, could not be ignored, and their support and assent for certain agreements was clearly going to be necessary if the wheels were to be greased and everything moved along. Give and take would have to be the motto of the day, if any progress was to be made...***********************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 23 Minutes 11 Jan 2019

With the launch of the Delegation Game only a week away (on 18th Jan 2019) I thought it'd be beneficial to set out some detail about this fantastic explosion of nerdiness, and what you need to do in order to take part. We look at some tools which the game will avail of, investigate what kind of impact your scheming can have on the proceedings, outline the structure of each episode going forward, and close the episode with some FAQ's, so that we're all on the same page.The Delegation Game is a seriously exciting effort by yours truly to engage more completely with the source material and era which the Versailles situation provides. I've already been blown away by the interest and enthusiasm shown, but if you'd like to know more, then this episode is for you! We launch in a week, so make sure you take your seat in Paris! Thankssss, and I'll see you all there soon!**********The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 33 Minutes 10 Jan 2019

ON_THIS_DAY_IN_HISTORY - 10th January 1919 - the Spartacist Uprising reaches its apex - before it is brutally crushed in Berlin.Rosa Luxemburg and Karl Liebknecht were the most prolific casualties, but much more was going on beneath the surface than simply the execution of Germany's communist extremists. The establishment of organisations like the Freikorps, and the struggle for order and law in this defeated, depressed country, contain more than enough stories all by themselves.In this episode, we will conclude our examination of this ill-fated uprising, assessing why it failed, what its aims were, whether it could have succeeded and how its impact was felt across the country and among the allies. Did it make the allies more or less eager to bring Germany to peace, before she succumbed to Bolshevism altogether? Let's find out, as we go back in time...****************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 34 Minutes 08 Jan 2019

Germany was in dire straits by the time revolutionaries began taking over the streets in early 1919. Bolshevism was spreading westwards, but perhaps the most potent ingredient in this spread was the lack of available food, and the endless opportunities this gave rabble rousers to cause anarchy and chaos on an unimaginable scale. Hunger was a more powerful weapon than any political message, and the combination of this desperation for a solution and the despair at the lack of aid - not to mention the continuing blockade - would soon spell disaster.Initially Germans held it together, but they could only keep the lid on the boil for so long before it all erupted. Here, we examine the background to the infamous Spartacist Uprising which seemed to threaten the end of Germany as the world knew it!**************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 34 Minutes 03 Jan 2019

OVER_THIS_PERIOD_IN_HISTORY - the first week of January 1919 - Woodrow Wilson begins his tour of Italy!In Italy, as in France, the citizens of that exhausted country were excited indeed to received the American President, and for six days until his departure on 6th January, Wilson travelled across Italy meeting everyone from the Pope to the King to the Premier. His mission was one of networking and publicity, and it went well, even if the Italians, deep down, did not gel particularly well with Wilson's vision of a new world. The world Wilson imagined, that of cooperation, and end to imperialism and peace, was in contrast to an Italian leadership and people who expected to be rewarded for their entry into the war. In time, the tension would explode, and Italy would get nothing at Wilson's insistence, a bitterness which helped facilitate Mussolini's acsendency. Initially at least, however, the Italian people were Wilson's friends.**********************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 33 Minutes 26 Dec 2018

ON_THIS_DAY_IN_HISTORY - 26th December 1918 - Woodrow Wilson meets David Lloyd George in London!Hope you're all not TOO full of foodstuffs, because we have an important little bulletin to bring to you! The US President's visit to London in late 1918 was significant for a myriad of reasons - not least of which was the sight of an American President getting a horse and carriage ride through the city's streets! Who would ever have imagined that such displays were possible between former colony and former master?Now these powers were firm friends, and the relationship between President and PM would only improve as time went on, and the two men realised they had more and more in common, to the detriment of the French premier of course, who quickly became something of an outsider.Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to you history friends! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 72 Minutes 22 Dec 2018

Here we conclude this incredible and early podcast Christmas present, which is 2/3 alternative history and 1/3 a breakdown of whether I believe this makes sense and why I went with what I did. How plausible was it all? You decide. This could be a very fun topic to have a number of debates on, but here we look at the opening phases of the war and what went right/wrong for each side. Irish troubles? Of course they are ever present! I hope you've enjoyed a different path instead of the dire one we got in 1914. Would the world be a better place had Princip missed? That's probably a story for another day, but for now we examine how the Entente came to collapse, and what this meant for the thoroughly victorious allies...Support and get in touch->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 66 Minutes 22 Dec 2018

Welcome history friends, as we launch into a little sideshow I cooked up for you all. This is the first in a chunky 2-parter series on alternative history, where we build a different world in the style you're used to, having asked the question - what would have happened if Gavrilo Princip missed, rather than actually successfully assassinated the Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand? Using all I've gathered in my years studying the First World War and the July Crisis in particular, I give you my answer, so I hope you enjoy it! Over the course of the episode we will look at several threads, such as the change in Serbian government and increasing tensions provoking reactionary policies across the Balkans, it remained to be seen whether the European alliance system would save the peace or help destroy it. Find out here, and remember to catch part 2!Support the show!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 25 Minutes 20 Dec 2018

You've been introduced to the Big Three of Wilson, Clemenceau and Lloyd George - you know their aims, their backstories and their fears. What happens though when these men gather together in the same room? Could they possibly cooperate? Could their varied viewpoints and aims be reconciled? Before the Paris Peace Conference opened, I feel it'd be useful to take each of the three men under our microscope again, and refresh ourselves on what they wanted, what they did NOT want, and that grey area where they could see themselves compromising.This episode will conveniently tie together all we've learned about the three men so far, and it is our last episode of the Versailles project before Christmas, so have a listen, refresh yourself, and I hope you have a safe and happy holiday season festivity Christmas food time! I think I covered all my bases! Thankssss :D*************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 32 Minutes 14 Dec 2018

ON_THIS_DAY_IN_HISTORY - 14th December 1918 - The Coupon Election secures Lloyd George's Coalition Government.It had long been expected that Lloyd George would call for an election at the end of the war, to beat off challenges to his position from both sides of the political spectrum, and to secure his mandate for the looming peace conference. Much was said about punishing Germany during the campaign trail, and making her pay what she owed to Britain and everyone else. The British electorate were thus heavy with expectation once their PM left for France in the new year - they anticipated Lloyd George would drive a hard bargain, and wrest concessions from the defeated foe which would vindicate their losses. As Lloyd George discovered, but probably knew already deep down, it wasn't so simple as taking things from Germany.Lloyd George, whatever his white lies, did managed to secure a mandate from the British electorate with this election. It was the most votes ever cast in any election in British history, and for the first time ever, women were also entitled to vote (so long as they were over 30 and were connected to someone with at least £5 of property that is...). The Coupon Election - so called for the curious way with which the incumbent government represented itself, with a coupon that indicated the loyalty of several varied candidates - was a success for the PM, but dark clouds were on the horizon.In Ireland, the old Irish Parliamentary Party had been wiped out by a new force called Sinn Fein, which refused to take its seats at Westminster. Within a month, a guerrilla war would erupt in Ireland, instigated by the decision of those Irish MPs to set up their own Parliament in Dublin. Still though, for the moment, Lloyd George could be happy. It was the result which Woodrow Wilson would have died for, because it granted a mandate for everything he did later, and demonstrated the faith and gratitude which the British people wished to express in their wartime leader.*****************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 27 Minutes 13 Dec 2018

ON_THIS_DAY_IN_HISTORY - 13th December 1918 - US President Woodrow Wilson lands in France.Woodrow Wilson had a vital role to play in the Treaty of Versailles, and was certainly the most dynamic actor in the Paris Peace Conference. Apparently immune to the old trappings of statecraft, intrigue and power, Wilson represented something new and promising for those French citizens and Europeans who were sick of war and who longed for something better. Wilson's rapturous welcome convinced him that he had done the right thing by deciding to travel to Paris personally, even though many had disapproved back home.Flattered, excited, vindicated though he was, the reception did not last. Wilson would never be so popular in France again...***********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 54 Minutes 12 Dec 2018

David Lloyd George's assent to the top of the greasy pole came at a difficult time for Britain and the allied war effort. The war did not appear near its end after all; instead the bloody stalemate had begun to tell, on all sides, and 1916 had been a year of crushing disappointments. Faced with a crisis in confidence, PM Asquith made way for the last Liberal Prime Minister of the age, Lloyd George, who ensured by early 1917 that he had the support of his colleagues in the wartime coalition to continue on with the war in the manner that he saw fit.Lloyd George's vision was tempered by realities and the hard lessons which still lay ahead, but he was at his best when delegating to his colleagues, when relinquishing something of his iron grip on power, and when accepting that sharing the load was the best way to win the war. New men were made and old men retreated from public life in disgust, but Lloyd George wasn't here to make friends. His single minded determination to win this damned war earned him admiration and appreciation, but it also represented the greatest test he had yet faced. That is, of course, until he had to craft the peace. Join us here as we unravel the traits which helped Lloyd George lead Britain to victory, no matter the cost...********************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 59 Minutes 10 Dec 2018

David Lloyd George, the unlikely Prime Minister, and the only PM in history to have spoken Welsh fluently, comes under our microscope in the final of our profiler episode couplets. Lloyd George's childhood and upbringing, his experience of life in Wales, his love of country, of justice and of independence - these were all important building blocks of a character which would soon serve Britain at its most critical time.We open our account of Lloyd George with an anecdote from Harold Nicolson, a vital eyewitness to the events of the Paris Peace Conference, and a man who happened to be present when the PM jubilantly announced the end to the war. This represented the end of a long, exhausting journey for Lloyd George, but he wasn't finished yet! Join us as we unwrap Lloyd George the man, before he became Lloyd George the leader.**********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 41 Minutes 05 Dec 2018

Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points are an integral part of what made the end of the First World War so fascinating, but also so confusing. Did the President want to go easy on Germans for the sake of it, or did he have more ambitious goals in mind? Was he as determined to remake the post-war order as we are often told, or were these fourteen points simply a smokescreen for the imperialistic policies which the president wished to pursue? The answers to these questions are not clear cut, but join us for episode twelve where we discuss each of these points in turn, assess how they were received by the international community, examine the impact of each point, and then detail the president's feelings on the document which he had just communicated to the world. The Fourteen Points were supremely important, not least because they represented the first true statement of peace terms revealed by any of the allies. Coming as they did in January 1918, the end of the war was some way off, but it is impossible to understate their importance as the months ticked by. As the provided image shows, Germany made use of these points as the basis for a peace settlement which, they hoped, would grant them what they wanted. For a variety of reasons, they were to be sorely mistaken...************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 76 Minutes 04 Dec 2018

Welcome to Woodrow Wilson's United States of America. As we build towards a key concept, the Fourteen Points, here we set some background and ask some pertinent questions, such as - why did the US intervene in the war, and why did Wilson wait so long before doing so?Woodrow Wilson is a character we must understand if we are to grasp the nuances of the Paris Peace Conference and the Treaty of Versailles which that created. Wilson was an integral part of what made the end Treaty so significant, but he can also be blamed for its uninspired record in America, and its ultimate failure. All the while, his message was one of firm but fair treatment for a defeated Germany, and this message was one which many at the top levels of Germany's government could not fail to heed.To understand where such high minded ideals came from, we must examine Woodrow Wilson before he arrived in Paris in late 1918. More than that, we must investigate whether Wilson's ideals were developed not to meet the crisis of the Great War, but as a repeat of what he had done before, in Mexico.Thus, we take a seemingly strange detour into the Mexican American border over 1913-1914, to get to the bottom of what the President was doing and why. Why did he care so much about what government was represented in Mexico? Why did he feel compelled to work against big businesses when they could have cut him a tidy profit? Wilson's actions led to turmoil along the border with Mexico, and even some Mexican raids into American soil, which Uncle Sam had to meet directly, as this cartoon suggests.My point is, in history, nothing is ever so straightforward as we might think. Wilson's famed ideals did not come from nowhere, and here we debate whether we can see their origins in the tumultuous relationship which America's southern neighbour had with the President. It's quite a journey, so I hope you'll join me to see where it takes us...***********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 17 Minutes 01 Dec 2018

ON_THIS_DAY_IN_HISTORY - 1st December 1918 - The Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats and Slovenes is proclaimed by Prince Regent Alexander of SerbiaThis kingdom, known to history as Yugoslavia, was to have a tumultuous birth, life cycle and death, but even its very name was contentious! Serbs wanted the state to indicate the greater Serb role in its administration and creation; non Serbs wanted to maintain the facade that all were equal under the new kingdom, and that it was more a union or federation than a unitary state. The facade was not maintained for long.This fragile kingdom, which drew together so many Balkan states and tidied up the region a great deal, was not built to last, but in this episode we examine the circumstances surrounding its proclamation, in the context of a world which was struggling to get to grips with everything that had come pouring out of Pandora's Box...*************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 55 Minutes 30 Nov 2018

If finding a solution to Western Europe was difficult, then untangling the morass which was Eastern Europe seemed like mission impossible. Thankfully for those flocking to Paris, Eastern Europeans had taken it upon themselves to do the legwork for them. Poles, Czechs, Yugoslavs and Romanians had all taken advantage of the power vacuums left by the vanished empires, and had staked their claims to land, people and resources while those in Paris gathered. Some leaders, like Edvard Benes (pictured) took matters into their own hands, while others were overtaken by the pace of events.In this episode we examine the fates and behaviours of these four powers, before they presented their individuals cases to the Paris Peace Conference in late January-early February 1919. All they would require, it was said, was the blessing of the statesmen at the French capital for their efforts...and maybe a tiny few adjustments here and there...***********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 31 Minutes 28 Nov 2018

ON_THIS_DAY_IN_HISTORY - sort of - everyone was going to Paris!Destination Paris: Mission, end the war! As thousands of people from all across the world flocked to Paris for the looming conference, Parisians and civil servants of all shades had the unenviable task of preparing the way for them. Hotels would have to acquired for the different delegations, some of these would have to be scrubbed from top to bottom.Wine would have to be found, as would tons of foodstuffs. Along with the delegations, thousands of other people from printers, journalists and curious travellers to prostitutes, actors and entertainers crowded the city. The British warned that no space was left, but nobody took any notice. Paris was the capital of the world for eight long months, and the task of preparing Paris would have to be tackled before anyone could even think of any kind of itinerary...*********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 49 Minutes 24 Nov 2018

"From the blind confusion of factional strife the Frenchman has emerged in this hour all of a piece throughout, stronger, more resolute, silent, smiling, his eyes bright with an invincible fire which affirms that the legend of France shall not fail…It is in that mysterious hour when something comes to birth in us which burns out the dross and clears the way for the casting of a metal which neither steel nor diamond can scratch. And when, some day, after superhuman efforts, all these souls, fatigued with heroism, meet again under the vast blue vault of a regenerated fatherland, it must be that of so many hearts which were sundered a soul of France will forge itself, and the discords which are a condition of life will dissolve, fast fused in a bond of solidarity so closely knit that nothing will have power to shatter it."These were the words which Georges Clemenceau used upon learning of the outbreak of the war. The war would cleanse France of its lethargy, provide it with an opportunity to redeem its past loss, and of course, provide an even more important opportunity to inflict a defeat upon Germany, and restore the rightful order of things. Nobody that marched to war in 1914 could have imagined the kind of losses which awaited their nation, and France was no exception. Her people quickly learned their lessons the hard way. In the month of August 1914 alone, 75,000 Frenchmen died. On the bloodiest day of the war for France, the 23rd August 1914, 27,000 men lay dead by the end of it.With losses like these, George Clemenceau quickly turned his attention to that critical question - why was the war so costly, and who was sabotaging France's successful realisation of its aims? It was above his imagination to think that actually, such casualties were the result not of sabotage or anyone's fault necessarily, and were instead the predicable consequences of a French high command which preferred old tactics like charging straight at the enemy - the cult of the offensive - while the soldiery were decked out in the finest clothing and fanciest accessories. France's old world was shattered after successive years in this meat grinder, but Clemenceau remained somewhat aloof from it all.A heavy critic of the government's method of fighting the war, Clemenceau found his paper banned and his friends no longer talking to him. Clemenceau became more shrill and less able to find some solution to the carnage, but in its hour of need, France relied on this formidable 76 year old once more. Against so many odds, this veteran statesman was at the helm of France again, and he had a strong message for those that would listen - not one more step back. Even if it took another August 1914 of casualties, Clemenceau was resolute in his determination not to give in to the German war effort. 1918 would test him to his limits, but at no point did the elder statesman ever imagine that making peace, would be just as difficult as winning the war*********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 69 Minutes 23 Nov 2018

France, that critically important cog in the machine of the Paris Peace Conference, had scores to settle and plenty to feel sorry about. The war had ripped through her people and country, bringing with it a plague of devastation unmatched in living memory. The flower of her youth lay dead, a demographic fact which she never truly recovered from. The final year of the war had been a trying and at times, gloomy one for France. Could Germany ever be defeated, was the question which seemed to surface at the beginning of every year, when some new general would propose a new offensive, only to be ground down again. All the while, the man on the ground would suffer.By late 1917, the country was nearing despair. It needed tough, resolute and defiant leaders if the anticipated harshness of the year to come were to be endured. In response, France sent forth two men, Marshal Ferdinand Foch to head up the Supreme Allied Command on the Western Front, and Georges Clemenceau, a veteran statesman of the radical persuasion who held one goal above all - defeating Germany and inflicting a peace upon her which would save France from another trauma like the Great War.Here, we meet Clemenceau, as we place him in his proper context, and examine the haunting aftermath of so many years of war, and the impact it had on a wounded French Republic. As we move through the relevant powers, we build a picture of the different cast of the Treaty of Versailles which is vital for us to appreciate if we are to have any hope understanding what happened next. Make sure you join me!********Listen to The Land of Desire podcast for more details on French history and culture - check out that series on the Dreyfus Affair!The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 44 Minutes 19 Nov 2018

Remember - check out the Delegation Game, and find out how you can participate in this exciting new way to make the very most out of this incredible centenary era...The famed armistice was signed followed several weeks' worth of diplomatic process, and several hours' worth of meetings between statesmen that didn't like each other very much. By the time it was finished, the document which they were left with went far short of what many had wanted, and was too harsh in the minds of others. Still, at its face value, it was a document which would bring the war to an end. After so many weeks of preparation, it finally came down to this, and the Germans arrived to sign on the dotted line.Actually, they had arrived to negotiate, only to be told that signing was all they would be permitted to do. There would be no negotiation. After several days' dallying in these circumstances, the ten man German delegation accepted that it had no choice. At 5.20AM on 11th November 1918, the armistice document was signed. Within the document, 35 articles stipulated what would happen next.We have, of course, touched on this event before, but in this episode we delve into this seismic event in history with the detail that you've come to love and expect from WDF, so tune in here! The Germans held out hope that many of these more difficult terms would be modified at a peace conference which was due to follow. For all intents and purposes though, even though the peacemaking was not over, the Great War finally was.******The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 38 Minutes 18 Nov 2018

Remember - check out the Delegation Game, and find out how you can participate in this exciting new way to make the very most out of this incredible centenary era...Sometimes, it isn't always the best idea to take vain people at their word. In the case of Edward House, the situation which he claimed to have created in Paris, in the run up to the signing of the armistice, and the situation he ACTUALLY created, proved to be two very different things.After several days meeting intimately with European leaders, House may have believed that he understood and could read these men, but in reality, they were the ones reading and manipulating him! In episode 4, 'Vision of Division', we examine this disconnect between what House believed he had achieved, and what had actually taken place during the preliminary peace negotiations.This episode is essential for establishing the foundations of what would take place later on at Versailles. House, indeed, had wrested from the allies a concession to make the Fourteen Points the basis for all peace settlements. However, this was qualified with several reservations, and House gave so much in return, particularly to the harsh armistice document, which was being drawn up at the same time, that his gains appear inconsequential in contrast to what he had been forced to sacrifice.The story, as ever, is one of intrigue, personal diplomacy, lobbying, disappointment, lies and frustration, and represents a prelude to the Paris Peace Conference which was to come. By the end, the allies had their armistice in hand, and the Germans were expected to agree to make peace within a few days, but at what cost?*********The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 59 Minutes 17 Nov 2018

Now THIS is exciting - click here to learn more about the aforementioned Delegation Game which I talked about for a great deal in this episode, and remember to connect with me if you have any questions! To everyone else, I hope you weren't too bothered by my rambling about it for ten minutes - I'm just super excited, and I think it could really be something special!Onto this episode at hand though, and we come to Edward House, Woodrow Wilson's best friend; a man whom the president could truly talk to like no other man. Wilson and House had been friends for years, and this friendship had grown and blossomed ever since Wilson became President. Considering their relationship, it seems bizarre to me that Wilson would send his friend to a place like Paris in late October 1918, and task him with arranging the preliminary negotiations for an armistice. Not only that, House was also tasked with paving the way forward for a peace conference that upheld the Fourteen Points as its basis.This was quite the mission, even for a formidable man like House, yet according to one source in particular (namely, House's diary), he was more than up to the task. From 26 October to 3 November, House represented his President to the British and French premiers, as the terms of an armistice, and an agreement about the foundations for a peace settlement were hammered out. House proclaimed a diplomatic triumph, but on closer inspection, the American diplomatic position was not as strong as the President may have liked to believe.Listening to this episode, 'The House That House Built' is a must for those interested in the American diplomatic approach, and in characters like Edward House, who were to dominate the peace negotiations for the next six months. House is the first of many vibrant characters which the era threw up, and while he was far from perfect, his actions would create an indelible mark upon the proceedings which were to follow, for better and for worse...Interested in reading Edward House's diary online for free? Click here, and thanksss again to Yale for making it all possible!*******The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 76 Minutes 16 Nov 2018

It is impossible to tell the story of the Treaty of Versailles without Germany, and in episode 2 of the VAP, 'Germany Falling, Germany Falling', we examine the state of Germany in military, economic and societal terms by mid-1918. A campaign which had started out so strong and filled everyone with false hope ended in failure. The gamble to move all men from east to the western front had failed, and the chasm in capability was growing by the hour.Stark pronouncements on the true state of affairs may have caught many Germans by surprise, but for those that had endured horrific deprivations, been starved, wounded, abandoned or simply vanished into the despair of total war, the reality cannot have been too much of a surprise. In this episode we place in context the gradual collapse of Germany in 1918, even while some in the country attempted, for their own reasons, to mount some form of final stand. Grim though the prospects of Germany seemed, there were some in the upper echelons of the military and civilian government who believed, for one reason or another, that Germany still had some potent cards to play. Episode 7, 'Ignoring Defeat' examines these last ditch efforts to save face and achieve peace with honour for Germany.What could Germans realistically do to avoid the worst peace terms? What did America's associates think of these back channel negotiations? How, indeed, did the Germans interpret all that went down in autumn 1918 as anything other than a catastrophe to be exited from at once?The truth is that, although she was defeated, the German army was not destroyed, and for as long as they could, certain figures within the country were willing to use the threat of resistance to the end as a last resort, even while at home, emaciated bodies lined the streets, mutinies piled up and soldiers deserted in droves. The collapse was imminent, seen most infamously in the Spartacist Revolution, but while she teetered on the edge, Germany made one last attempt to have things her way...*******The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!->Follow WDF on Twitter!->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 41 Minutes 13 Nov 2018

Another introduction episode - this one giving us a brief(ish) rundown on the origins of the Great War, for the benefit of those that have not listened to the July Crisis Anniversary Project of old. The world went to war in 1914, and the circumstances which surround that event are often held against Germany in the subsequent peace negotiations. Germany, it is said, started the whole wretched thing, so she should be punished once her gamble failed, and she clearly lost. In my view though, it isn't that simple.Historians tend to take one side or the other when it comes to examining the July Crisis and Treaty of Versailles. By that I mean, either Germany started the war and deserved the Treaty, or she didn't start it or deserve it. I won't be this clear cut, because the situation and the debate aren't this clear cut. In my mind, Germany alone did not start the war - even though technically she did declare war on Russia first and begin the countdown - but she did deserve some kind of punishment for LOSING it.Germany, as my thesis for this project will argue, was punished for losing the Great War, not for starting it.Any statesman worth their salt in 1918-19 knew full well that there was more to the story than the straightforward tale of the belligerent Hun. Germany had to be punished and kept low so that she could not threaten the peace again, and because of her military loss, this meant that she was liable to be punished - just as Berlin had punished her enemies in Russia and Romania, and developed grand plans for punishing Britain and France before her war plans collapsed. The issue with Versailles wasn't so much the injustice of it, as we will learn, but the problem of making Germany accept its terms, when Germans came to believe that they hadn't been truly beaten, hadn't truly started the war, and had been unfairly blamed.Yet, an important point to remember is that war guilt - another issue we will deal with in time - did not have to exist in Germany in order for the judgement of Germany's contemporaries to follow. It did not matter, in other words, who started the war, as much as it mattered who lost it, and what was to be done next. This episode will help us refocus our gaze on that critical issue, and also ensure that we're all on the same page when it comes to my thesis and ideas about the origins of the First World War. As always, I'd ask you guys keep an open mind - we'll be sticking together for the next eight months, so you better get used to my outside the box way of thinking!*****************The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!Visit the homeland for this new project:http://www.wdfpodcast.com/vap/Support the podcast financially:https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsFollow WDF on Twitter!https://twitter.com/wdfpodcast For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 25 Minutes 12 Nov 2018

We must set the structure and sources of this project in front of you before we jump right into it, and we should also clarify our aims before we go any further too. We have got a LOT of ground to get into over the next eight months, but I hope that you are ready to join me for this fascinating and illuminating journey, as we examine this era of our past like you've never seen it before.Of course it is worth setting forth our aims: 1) create the most comprehensive, but also the most accessible, account of the Treaty of Versailles in audio form. 2) investigate whether the Treaty really was so bad, or whether some redeeming features exist within it. 3) ascertain how responsible, if at all, the Treaty was for all the vile catastrophes that followed it in the 20th century.*****The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!Visit the homeland for this new project:http://www.wdfpodcast.com/vap/Support the podcast financially:https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsFollow WDF on Twitter!https://twitter.com/wdfpodcast For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 47 Minutes 12 Nov 2018

To make it through the tons of research material available on the Treaty of Versailles, it is essential we take a certain angle as our guide. Find out what kind of angle I am interested in, and how I plan to divide the different sections of this project up, so that you and I can get through it with our sanity maintained!It's going to be a wild ride to 28th June, but before we reach those sumptuous halls (below), we first have to paint a picture, or series of pictures, that help us set the scene. As ever, context is our King, and it's time we got right down to it... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 22 Minutes 11 Nov 2018

It's time. It's time at long last to unleash this project, to reveal the hidden complexities, the terrible truths, the dire dangers, the fascinating characters and the inspiring anecdotes of the period in history so often maligned and misunderstood, but so critically important to our world. It's time to go to 11th November 1918, where the guns fell silent at long last, and the birds could finally be heard to sing.******The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed!Visit the homeland for this new project:http://www.wdfpodcast.com/vap/Support the podcast financially:https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsFollow WDF on Twitter!https://twitter.com/wdfpodcast For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 32 Minutes 08 Nov 2018

WDF is about to be positively lit up by the most ambitious project we've ever taken on, but before we jump into that, I felt it only right that I bring you guys up to speed with my new job, how I got on in the Sound Education Podcast Conference in Harvard, some notes about the podcasting schedule, a bit on Dan Carlin, some more info about my future and even more ramblings - sounds like a state of the podcast address to me! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 24 Minutes 30 Oct 2018

It's time to say goodbye to this incredible era, and to end this whopper journey we've been on for the past 11+ months. I really can't believe we're here, but we are, and I figured there was never a better time to end this series, than on my birthday, so happy birthday to me!Our conclusion examines a suitably poignant moment in recent history - the location of a reunion of Korean families, trapped and separated for more than six decades by a war which they never wanted, but which they have been paying for for their entire lives. It is here, I believe, that we should end our story - with a reminder that the greatest losers in the conflict of no winners, was the Korean people themselves.Thankssss as always for joining me history friends, and make sure you prepare yourselves for the Versailles Anniversary Project, coming on 11 November 2018... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 48 Minutes 29 Oct 2018

It's time to say good bye!Episode 48: Something Of An Ending gathers together everything we’ve learned over the last 47 episodes and returns to those key questions, theories and goals which opened our series all those months ago. It is a typically intensive episode, since we have a good deal of stuff to talk about, several things to reiterate and not a small amount of final goodbyes to wave at our key figures. By now you have seen our narrative underline and hopefully vindicate my conclusions, which I presented to you guys all the way back in the introduction episodes. It’s been quite a journey, to put it mildly, and I have sincerely enjoyed taking it with you, as we learned, laughed and were shocked together.I hope you’ll continue to seek out new information on the Korean War, and that you now have seen for yourself that this conflict is so much more than just a few sentences in a textbook. Instead, it was the vital ingredient in the Cold War, the terrible tragedy which cost millions of lives, and the start point for countless diplomatic and military initiatives, with varying degrees of success. The Korean War was many things to many people, but now it’s time for us to say goodbye, and to prepare for our next series – the Versailles Anniversary Project. Of course, this wouldn’t be WDF if we didn’t have an Epilogue and Conclusion to round our narrative off, so make sure you place the cherry on top of our experience here, by tracking those episodes down in the next few days. Other than that my lovely history friends and patrons – it is time to say thanksss, and I’ll be seeing you all soon!**********Music used:“Streets of New York” by Billy Murray released in 1907. Available: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Billy_Murray/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_03032015/The_Streets_of_New_York_-_Billy_MurraySPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 50 Minutes 29 Oct 2018

Episode 47: Ike Will Bring Them Home! This is our penultimate episode, and as such plays a critical role in bringing several threads of our narrative together. How fluent in the use of atomic diplomacy was Eisenhower’s administration? Armed with the knowledge we have from the last episode, we can state that Eisenhower was far from the first President to bring atomic weapons into the diplomatic discourse. Indeed, it makes sense that the first and last president of the US to make use of the atomic bomb should make the most active use of it in diplomacy. In addition, contrary to the conventional view, Eisenhower’s administration failed in the last phase of the Korean War to actually formulate a coherent policy regarding nuclear weapons and diplomatic pressure. For a number of reasons, the former General was content to drag his feet.Dispensing with the myths of atomic diplomacy enables us to look more closely at the very real role which the Indians played in putting forward the policy ideas in the UN General Assembly, most notably in the case of the touchy prisoners issue. The genuine importance of Indian diplomacy in that institution has been greatly understated for some time, and in this episode we’ll give them their proper due. The Chinese will of course also need to be considered, since if atomic diplomacy did not force them to make peace, what can we say actually did? The answer has as much to do with the policy of bluff as it does with the death of Josef Stalin, and it’s another fascinating journey I can’t wait to take you on! Of course, the major appeal of this episode is in the loose ends are tied up – it is in this instalment of our series that the Korean War is finally brought to its anticlimactic end on 27th July 1953.SPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our website and sign up to ouracast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 39 Minutes 26 Oct 2018

Episode 46: Atomic Diplomacy looks at the fascinating tactic supposedly made use of by the Eisenhower administration in the first half of 1953. This policy of threatening nuclear war if the communists did not see sense worked, so the conventional account suggests, and it worked because NSC68 had so empowered American defensive capabilities. However, as we’ll see in this episode, Eisenhower’s tactic was neither completely successful nor was it unprecedented. In fact, to set the background by what we mean when we talk about atomic diplomacy, in this episode we’ll examine not Eisenhower’s, but Truman’s consistent approach to that weapon in diplomatic negotiations, while we also assess the general perspective of the political and military staffs of the early 1950s.The result is a surprising but also critically important set of take aways – not only was Truman unsuccessful in his efforts to bluster with the atomic bomb, he also learned from these failures, and refrained from threatening the communists from spring 1951. This gap enabled the Eisenhower administration, or more accurately John Foster Dulles, to claim that the new brand of atomic diplomacy was a great success, and played a leading role in ending the war. The truth, as we’ll learn, was far from so straightforward.*********Music used:“Take Me Out To The Ball-game”, by the Hayden Quartet released in 1908. This classic should be familiar to everyone, even those like myself who don’t know what’s going on if they watch a baseball game! Available: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Hadyn_Quartet/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_04212015/Take_Me_Out_to_the_Ballgame_-_Hadyn_QuartetSPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 41 Minutes 21 Oct 2018

Our endless flurry of Korean War content continues as we pave the way towards the Versailles Anniversary Project! Stay tuned!Episode 45: The Culminating Factors brings several threads of our story together, as we count down towards the establishment of peace amidst the political climb of Dwight D. Eisenhower, who would be elected President of the US and wave goodbye to the Truman administration. The story of how Eisenhower got there, and why he decided that “I will go to Korea” is a fascinating one which we examine here. At the same time, we look at what the departing Truman administration meant for American foreign policy. Was Truman sad to leave, or did he believe that he had done his duty for American security, and left a lasting legacy on that office?In addition to examining these aspects of the story, we look as well at the coercive diplomacy used by Eisenhower. Was Eisenhower’s diplomatic approach, as the historical consensus suggests, sprinkled with several sticks and threats, in a bid to force the communists out of the war? A great deal of evidence exists to suggest that the Eisenhower administration did engage in a great deal of coercive, even nuclear, diplomacy, from 1953. However, while this does fit quite nicely with the idea that NSC68 made America more powerful and thus better positioned to actually lob threats at its rivals, we will see in future episodes that the reality is not so straightforward.SPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our website and sign up to our Newsletter For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 39 Minutes 20 Oct 2018

Episode 44: Talking & Fighting picks up from last time with the Korean peace process, as the allies managed to sit down at last and talk face to face with the communists, at a place called Kaesong. As we’ll discover, getting the communists to sit and talk with them was only half the battle. The Chinese and North Koreans were well equipped to turn even the most genuine peace initiative into a great propaganda victory. When they weren’t applying their own brand of spin to the latest talks, they were talking in public and preparing for more war in private.Indeed, the first year of peace talks was to be one of immense frustration to the allies, who were made to look like supplicant puppets in the communist propaganda, and then like fools when those same communists took advantage of the lull in hostilities to prepare a defensive line which would, with some small changes, remain unchanged for the next two thirds of the war. Peace initiatives thus had their price, but as the allies and the communists well understood, peace initiatives were the only means by which the Korean War could be ended, and the suffering soldiers be returned home. Dilemmas such as these were a dime a dozen in the wearisome conflict, and Korea was by no means finished with the allies yet.************Music used:“Is There Still Room For Me ‘Neath the Old Apple Tree”, by Albert Campbell and Henry Burr, released in 1916. Available: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Albert_Campbell_and_Henry_Burr/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_01202015/Is_There_Still_Room_for_Me_Neath_the_Old_Apple_Tree_-_Albert_Campbell_and_Henry_BurrSPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 50 Minutes 16 Oct 2018

Episode 43: Peace Talks, Almost presents the situation on the frontlines as it stood in spring 1951, following some promising offensives by General Ridgeway which effectively crushed the Chinese capacity to launch another great offensive again. This incapacitation of the Chinese by no means meant that the communists were ready to roll over; indeed, the Chinese were still determined to hold on. As the allies crossed the 38th parallel for the second time, indeed, there was no genuine desire to push the envelope either, and to advance once more to the Yalu River. To have done so may well have escalated the situation, and caused the Chinese to declare an open war against the allies. Neither Washington nor its allies wanted this, but what the allies wanted above all was an end to the war after so many difficult months, and Washington was forced to listen to this request.As certain initiatives were approached, the real star of the peace-making game loomed into view. The Indian delegation in the United Nations held influence among the third world delegations, and had been a convenient go-between with the Chinese and the West in years past. Now, Indian Prime Minister Nehru wished to bring an end to the Korean War through the auspices of the UN, either through its General Assembly or its Security Council, which India held a temporary seat in at this critical time. With high hopes, Nehru’s representatives in New York busied themselves throughout 1951, but it soon became clear that not even the Americans could be counted as reliable, in the strange game which was peace-making. With several twists and turns ahead, the Indians settled down into a long, arduous pressure campaign, just as the soldiers settled into the early phases of military stalemate.**********Music used:“Alabama Red”, by Sidney Stripling, released in 1941, available: http://www.museumsyndicate.com/item.php?item=82676SPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 52 Minutes 14 Oct 2018

Episode 42: So Long Old Soldier bids farewell to General MacArthur in a podcast experience which has to be heard to be believed! Before we get to the point that MacArthur stood before Congress and gave that rousing farewell speech on 19th April 1951 though, we have to detail how it was that the relationship between President and General deteriorated to such a point that both parted ways. It was not, predictably enough, MacArthur’s choice. Yet, for a myriad of reasons, including MacArthur’s inability to stop flapping his gums, Truman decided in early April to pull the plug on the grizzled General’s career.Truman’s decision is still debated to this day. It seems at its core was the problems that MacArthur presented to American foreign policy. It seemed, in spring 1951, that there were two American foreign policies – one presented by the Truman administration in Washington, the other communicated by MacArthur’s staff in Tokyo. In a world where America’s allies were anxious that the war not be escalated, it was only natural that the President would seek to limit his General’s pronouncements, lest they cause a chain reaction and ruin the original plan. Fortunately for Truman, the end of MacArthur’s career was not an out of the blue event, but an incident which contained several stages that had been prepared in time. It was in many ways the perfect conclusion to a plan set in motion months beforehand, but that didn’t mean the General was going down without a significant PR fight. Let’s see how it all looked, as I take you to one of the most contentious, and vibrant periods of the Korean War!*********Music used:“I’ll Say She Does” by Al Jolson, released in 1919. Available: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Al_Jolson/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_04212015/Ill_Say_She_Does_-_Al_JolsonSPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 39 Minutes 12 Oct 2018

Episode 41: Adored No More examines the week following the shattering experience of Chinese intervention on a grand scale. With General MacArthur’s credibility in tatters, President Truman’s plan to apportion blame to his least favourite General now appeared to make all the more sense. MacArthur was under immense pressure to explain himself, and when he finally did, Truman’s response was to place a gag order on all US figures from talking about the country’s foreign policy. Truman claimed he was protecting the unity and integrity of Washington’s plans, but this was debateable.On the ground, amidst the schemes of the President and the desperate errors of the General, the men suffered. From late November until early spring, the soldiers were to experience a debilitating retreat in the worst wintery conditions seen in living memory. As all the practical difficulties blended in together, and as the talk in Washington continued, few could deny that the once triumphant General had taken a severe knock to his reputation and prestige. Here was the man who had led the President astray, and who had promised that all would be over by Christmas. Here was the man, who even if he was still respected for his tenure of service, was adored no more.*******Music used:“Columbus Stockade Blues”, by Bert and Ruby Rains released in 1940, covered by the likes of Willie Nelson, it’s one of my personal favourites. Available: http://www.museumsyndicate.com/item.php?item=82651SPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our website and sign up to our Newsletter For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 38 Minutes 10 Oct 2018

Episode 40: Shock & Awe continues where we left off last time. This was the result of the Truman administration’s months of planning and theorising, and for the sake of NSC68 and the strategy of containment, it was believed to be the right one. The Chinese had finally intervened, and thus the efforts to make this so must have been considered a success. Yet, on the ground level, it was anything but a success, as the Chinese advanced with a ferocious pace and zeal that stunned and shattered all allied soldiers they encountered. With MacArthur apoplectic in Tokyo, it remained for the soldiers on the ground, let blindly into this mess by their vain commander, to pick up the slack.Instead, sense prevailed, and a massive retreat without parallel in American military history characterised the allies action in December of 1950. Several bloody and bitter battles were still to come with the Chinese, who blended their command with the North Koreans and fulfilled the total control of Pyongyang that Mao Zedong now aimed to seize. Beijing’s aims could not be certain, but Mao was now determined, after being pushed into this corner, to make something good out of the situation and to get some kind of benefit for his regime. As ever, it was the soldier on the ground that suffered for the statesman’s objectives. Meanwhile, Truman is confronted about nuclear weapons, and the plans to throw MacArthur under the bus were put into motion.*******Music used:“The Gaby Glide”, by Billy Murray, released in 1912 and available at: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Billy_Murray/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_04282015/The_Gaby_Glide_-_Billy_Murray SPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 44 Minutes 07 Oct 2018

Truman continues to set up his General, as the allied soldiers wander into the consequences on the Manchurian border...Episode 39: ‘An Entirely New War’ focuses on that moment in the conflict when the Chinese finally pulled the trigger and invaded in massive force between late October and late November 1950. After months of diplomatic manoeuvring, Mao Zedong seemed to finally have had enough and believed that the moment had come to act in force. This decision, fully in line with the aims of the Truman administration, would destroy the plans of General MacArthur and reverse overnight the sense of superiority and positivity which had dominated his staff since the triumph at Inchon.As an episode it is a long one, but it is also a critical pivot of our story and contains too many vital threads to list here. Within we’ll see shattered dreams, fulfilled ambitions, distraught soldiers, zealous communists, hopeful North Koreans, confused subordinates, wasted resources, missed opportunities, unexpected bravery and so much more. It’s an episode which ties so many important elements of our narrative together, and it really has to be heard to be believed.SPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our website and sign up to our Newsletter For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 40 Minutes 30 Sep 2018

Truman serves up MacArthur, and contrary to popular imagination, it was not the General, but the President, who schemed in the background - at least at this stage...Episode 38: The Perfect Scapegoat introduces one of the most infamous aspects of the Korean War narrative to you guys – that insufferable tension between President and General which would eventually lead to the dismissal of the latter and harsh criticism of the former. It was a difficult relationship long before this plug was pulled though, and while we’ve seen disagreements and MacArthur’s reaction to the Truman administration’s policies vary, we take some time here to properly root a portion of our narrative in this perspective. More specifically, here we return to that meeting on Wake Island on 15th October between Truman and MacArthur, and we examine what I believe is the real reason why the President began to increasingly present himself alongside everyone’s favourite triumphant General. It wasn’t because he was in search of some of the glory for himself, instead it was because Truman was already thinking of the post-war situation, and of his own legacy.While he would accept, as President, a portion of the blame for allowing the war in Korea to escalate into the massively expensive but still limited war with the Chinese, he was not willing to accept all of this blame. Indeed, he was determined now to leave behind the crumbs of evidence which would later enable critics to note that MacArthur’s considerable and well known hubris was just as much to blame for the intervention of the Chinese as was the official line from Washington which continued to underestimate the Chinese stance and capabilities. When MacArthur assured his President that the Chinese would not intervene, Truman likely already knew thanks to the codebreaking that Mao had announced his intention to intervene in a cable to Kim Il-sung. In this respect then, General Douglas MacArthur was the perfect scapegoat – he was as belligerent and vain as he was totally out of the loop of what Washington was aiming for, and he would help take much of the focus from the President once the Chinese did, contrary to MacArthur’s claims but in line with Truman’s information, invade.********Music used:“My Sweetie Went Away” by Bessie Smith, released in Nov 1923. Bessie Smith was an American blues singer. Sometimes referred to as The Empress of the Blues, Smith was the most popular female blues singer of the 1920s and 1930s. Available: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Bessie_Smith/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_02172015/My_Sweetie_Went_Away_-_Bessie_SmithSPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 18 Minutes 27 Sep 2018

Since the founding of the United States, in every generation, in every field of business, politics, sports and society, we’ve watched in shock as corruption, deceit and desire bring down heroes, titans and those we thought we could trust.In the aftermath, we’re left with too many questions, how did this happen? Who is to blame?American Scandal, a new podcast from Wondery, will answer these questions. They tell the stories of America’s biggest scandals, the who, how and why, to discover what happened, how they changed our country - and what lessons we can learn.I encourage you to subscribe to American Scandal. The first story is a look inside America’s pastime - Baseball - and scandal that changed the way we view our favorite athletes. It’s riveting. And while you’re listening, subscribe to American Scandal on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. Thanksss! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 42 Minutes 23 Sep 2018

Episode 37: Burning Chinese takes our story back a bit to late September, in roughly the same timeframe we covered in the last episode, to examine how the American policy was developed as the Chinese became ever more pressed to involve themselves. The official picture in Washington and among the UN allies, and of course in General MacArthur’s mind, was that no matter what they publicly said, the Chinese would not, could not intervene, and that thus, all evidence to the contrary was bluff or the intrigue of some communist agent. America’s leaders worked hard to reinforce this message, and it certainly likely that some heartily believed that there was no sense in stopping at the 38th parallel now that the North Koreans – the aggressors – were clearly in flight.Yet, it is inconceivable, as we’ve learned, that the Truman administration did not plan or think to plan for what may have occurred if Mao Zedong did decide to send his forces over the Yalu River. Indeed, if you believe my research, we have seen that this intervention was what the President wanted, but that to prevent the allies from being spooked, a more conservative presentation of foreign affairs was necessary for the public consumption. Fortunately for Truman, he was helped by the British who in this episode put forward their proposal to the UN General Assembly to cross the 38th parallel and continue the advance up North.This wasn’t because the British wanted the conflict that Truman did; instead it was because, after several pressure campaigns, it had been made clear to Atlee’s administration that support for the American policy in Korea would be taken as a litmus test of loyalty. With such a compelling reason to support the Americans, many UN allies would be taken, often against their will, across the 38th parallel, as MacArthur enthusiastically led the charge to wipe out the last vestiges of Kim’s regime. As we’ll see in this episode, even now, as October progressed, warning signs were becoming difficult to ignore.*********Music used: “By the Light of the Silvery Moon”, by Billy Murray and the Hadyn Quartet, available: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Billy_Murray_and_Haydn_Quartet/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_03032015/By_The_Light_of_The_Silvry_Moon_-_Billy_Murray_and_Haydn_QuartetSPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2)... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 52 Minutes 16 Sep 2018

Our biggest episode yet!Episode 36: Ordering Chinese picks up from the last episode, this time from the perspective of the Chinese, as in late September they were clearly faced with something of a quandary. Stalin was ramping up his campaign to urge the Chinese to intervene, and in response, the Chinese claimed that since Kim Il-sung had yet to ask for help, Beijing could not give it. Stalin thus set to work engineering his plan into motion, and ensuring that the North Koreans would indeed ask for help. It was only to be expected that as the military situation worsened for Pyongyang in light of the Inchon landings, that Kim would see sense and appeal to the communist comrade in Beijing. Indeed, it was likely that he would have no choice but to do otherwise, thanks to the Soviet unwillingness to aid the NKPA in its time of need.In case Soviet involvement in the war was discovered by the West, Stalin insisted, the Soviets would have to pull the plug of support for the Northern Army. These threats were delivered solely to produce the policy outcome that Stalin wanted, and in the first two weeks of October, we’ll see how, after some hesitation and preparations, Mao Zedong determines that the time had come to intervene. With a resolution approving the crossing of the 38th parallel on 7th October, it was clearly necessary to fight back and prepare for the conflict which Mao had once feared, then tacitly accepted, and now actively planned for. The next phase of the conflict began to whir into life, just as MacArthur believed that his greatest triumph was in the works.**********Music used:“Sister Susie’s Sewing Shirts”, Al Jolson, available: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Al_Jolson/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_03242015/Sister_Susies_Sewing_Shirts_for_Soldiers_-_Al_JolsonSPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 40 Minutes 09 Sep 2018

Remember your NSC reports!NSC 68: The reason we're all here (ish).NSC 81: The public report on compromises that pleased everyone and meant nothing. Especially no mention of the Chinese...NSC 73: The secret report which imagined Chinese involvement.NSC 76: The report which confirmed that the Soviets would never get involved.Episode 35: Up In Flames examines that pivotal moment in the history of the Korean War, when General MacArthur finally got the chance to achieve his greatest triumph at Inchon. The build-up to this event and the circumstances which surrounded it were far from conventional as we have seen, since the war plans of the Soviets, Chinese and Americans all relied on MacArthur achieving a great success for their own reasons, yet the triumph at Inchon was an unmistakable victory for the grizzled General and his unflinching attitude towards the communists. Might, it seemed, had indeed made right.Under the surface of this great success, the political and strategic interests of Washington were still being considered. The NSC had been busy creating some new policy approaches, one which dealt with Chinese intervention, NSC 73, and another which dealt with a World War 3 scenario of Soviet involvement in NSC 76. Both of these plans were top secret, and they were drawn up in response to the unpredictable stance of Moscow and Beijing. Washington kept its true ambitions a secret from its allies and enemies, and forged ahead with NSC 81, a compromise filled document which pleased the allies, but which, on the surface, solved few problems.What was more, while the situation in Korea moved towards Inchon, American leaders strengthened their hand in Europe by empowering the West German government, and securing that flank of the European common defence perimeter. All hands were now dedicated to defending against communism, a necessary exercise thanks to the example given by Korea. For the British, and especially for the French fighting the communist Vietminh, the increasing activism of communism illuminated the importance of bringing their old foes into the struggle. In the midst of further warnings from Beijing, MacArthur pushed forward past Seoul and onto the 38th parallel in late September, bypassing the objections of allies and the resolutions from the Indians. The moment of truth was approaching fast.************Music used:“Everybody Loves My Fanny” by Benny Bell, another wonderful double entendre song since you all enjoyed Shaving Cream so much. Benny’s collection can be found at: https://archive.org/details/BennyBellSPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 38 Minutes 07 Sep 2018

This is it history friends, our last free episode of section 2 of 1956! If you like what you hear here, then make sure and track down the rest. Hours of content await, not just associated with this series. If you want to invest in Zack Twamley, in history podcasting and in WDF's future, then supporting us on Patreon is the best way to do that. I'd be most grateful, and you'd be filled with more history audio than you can shake an Egyptian stick at! Head on over to our Patreon page and access all of 1956 for $5 a month by clicking here.Episode 2.2: Suez, A Life examines that critical actor in the Suez Crisis… No I’m not just talking about the British, I’m also talking about the Suez Canal! A French investment opportunity, an ancient idea, and a British masterstroke, discover in this episode how this waterway became so monumentally important for British imperial interests in the latter 19th century, and how this interest was then carried over into the 20th century. After years of defending and expanding their stock in Suez, it was highly unlikely that Britain was going to give up its position there without a fight. Yet, at the same time, decolonisation trends across the world were in full swing, and it was far from certain that Egypt could be held while certain movements were underway.The most important of all these movements in decolonisation era Africa was found on 23rd July 1952, when a coup against King Farouk of Egypt, that docile and loyal British puppet, succeeded. A cadre of Egyptian military men now held control over the country, and they were determined to be anything but puppets to the British interest. Nationalists for Egypt as much as for the idea of pan-Arabism, one figure surged forward above all. His name was Gamal Abdel Nasser, and in this episode, we will be introduced to him, as we see what the British establishment was up against. Mindful of Britain’s interests in his country, and its unsavoury record there, Nasser was not about to give ground for nothing. Thousands of miles away, a government change waved goodbye to Winston Churchill, and ushered in his subordinate Anthony Eden. The stage was set for a conflict which was unlike any other yet seen in the British experience.Remember - you can access the rest of 1956 for just $5 a month by clicking here and signing up to WDF on Patreon! Thankssss! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 32 Minutes 06 Sep 2018

PATRONS! HISTORY FRIENDS! Everyone in between! Part 2 of 1956 is now upon us, and here’s what you should do.First – ask yourself, do you love history? Second – answer yes, and have a listen to us here, as we unpack the Suez Crisis, in 21 easy steps!For everyone, episodes 2.1 and 2.2 are out now, but for those Patrons at the $5 level and above, 1956 is about to get very interesting indeed! For the rest of the year we’ll be hitting you with the run up to, outbreak of and consequences of the SUEZ CRISIS. If you’ve been holding off from being a Patron up to now, then I can guarantee you that there has never been a better time to sign up. I think the last time we released a series so diplomatically juicy was…well…every time, but still, you’d be mad to miss out!So what’s in the box of Episode 2.1: Bitter French Pills? Well in order to get to the bottom of Suez, we must begin the story with one its main actors, and this is where the French come in. In this episode, we will examine the painful post-war experience of France, why it was so reluctant to let go of its colonies and how this caused it more damage in the long run. As an integral, but largely forgotten player in the Crisis, understanding the French angle is essential for us. On many occasions, the fractured French government would be the only thing holding the also fractured plans for Suez together. Here, we discover what was moving the French in North Africa, and how its bitter Algerian pill, which it would put off swallowing for some time, so influenced its government’s decision to weigh in against Egypt.I hope you’ll join me for this first episode of Part 2! I for one am really excited to get into it, so remember that if you want to access ALL of the history, come and visit us at Patreon! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 20 Minutes 06 Sep 2018

After an interesting prelude, we are finally ready to tackle the main event of our series - the Suez Crisis. In this introductory episode, we explain what's in store, who to prepare for, what we're wary of and exactly why you should be excited for part 2 of this eventful series. Remember, the first two episodes will be out for FREE in line with getting everyone in the mood, but be sure to head over to our Patreon page to access all 20 of these episodes in full. For only a fiver a month, all of this and more could be yours.For those interested, make sure and track down the 1956 bibliography from the section of our website. Thankssss history friends, and stay tuned! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 10 Minutes 05 Sep 2018

American Innovations have begun a new series looking at Artificial Intelligence, a concept which does not just revolve around Skynet destroying the world! Make sure you listen into this sample of this fascinating idea, and make sure you subscribe to this great new podcast from Wondery by clicking here.American Innovations can be found in its glory at its website here.Thanks to Wondery for sponsoring WDF and the Agora network, and thankssss to our listeners for making this partnership possible. Through partnerships like these, we producers get some funds, and you listeners get to access some fascinating free content, so everyone wins! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 35 Minutes 02 Sep 2018

The fire by rank tactic used by Europeans in the 18th and 19th centuries had surprising beginnings, as we learn in this episode. While key military thinkers like Maurice of Nassau in the Netherlands played a pivotal role in changing how infantry were viewed and used on the battlefield, it is highly likely that he acquired inspiration for these ideas not just from Europe’s Ancient past, but also from Asian innovations many thousands of miles away.The adoption of the musket on a wide scale and its incorporation into the infantry-based armies of the 1500s was a process made into legend by the Spanish, who achieved their supremacy on the continent with the tercio formations – pikemen squares surrounded by musketmen, with a secure centre and the capacity to meet any challenge, be it man or beast, on the field. This tercio formation granted the Spanish stunning victories, from Pavia in 1525, all the way up to Nordlingen in 1634. Yet, as a tactic, it was gradually dying, to be replaced by Maurice of Nassau’s innovations in the fire by rank approach. In this tactic, men would line up as a group of musketmen several ranks deep. The front rank would discharge their weapons and march to the back of their unit to reload, with the second rank following suit, and so on. In this way, a constant volley of fire would be poured into the enemy – in this case the vaunted Spanish tercio formations, with devastating results. This tactic harnessed the potential for superior firepower which the musket could boast, and it ensured that further innovations were possible. In this episode we trace the development of this idea from its unlikely beginnings, and in the next episode, we will see it in action for the first time. Make sure you join us for this fascinating look at European warfare in the 17th century history friends! Thanksss! SPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 39 Minutes 26 Aug 2018

Episode 34: Building Inchon examines the extensive diplomatic and political preparation which the Truman administration engaged with in the weeks before MacArthur’s landing at Inchon on 15th September 1950. Truman was forced to deal with several issues, including the independently minded actions of some of his own personnel, like the Secretary of Defence, who would be forced to resign. We see a new policy report NSC 81 come to the fore, even while it didn’t promise a whole lot it still managed to please the British and French, which was its primary goal.Meanwhile, Mao and Stalin’s cynical approach to Kim Il-sung’s precarious position became clear as August became September. As Stalin’s support of North Korea slackened, the Soviet leader became focused instead with building towards his political strategy and end goal of bringing China into conflict with the West. Mao on the other hand was determined to wait until the landings at Inchon took place, landings which he almost certainly expected, so that it would be easier to swoop into North Korea and re-orientate the loyalties of that state in its moment of desperation.Thus the Americans were allowed to plan for their famed amphibious landing in peace, and General MacArthur moved forward with his finest hour unaware that he was as much of a pawn in the wider game as Kim Il-sung had been. It was up to MacArthur now to turn the tide and open the next phase of this conflict, and the General proved more than up to the task.*******Music used“You’re a Grand Old Rag” by Billy Murray in 1906. Available: https://archive.org/details/GrandOldRag-BillyMurray9256SPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our website and... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 27 Minutes 23 Aug 2018

It's time to break it down again. All history friends get a chance to sample the finest history produce, which in this case, means you get to tuck into a preview of episodes 1.13, 1.14 and 1.15 of 1956 phase one. Lucky you! Make sure to check these out and venture over to our Patreon page if you want more! For only $5 a month you too could have access to the best stuff in our repertoire. Thankssss! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 43 Minutes 19 Aug 2018

Check out the Sound Education Podcast Conference at Harvard University, where you can meet yours truly and listen to some brilliant minds in podcasting over 2-3 November 2018!Episode 33: Chinese Chequers continues where we left off last time, as the implications of the American approach to Korea and Taiwan are heavily felt in Beijing. Mao now had reason to believe that the war could be turned to his advantage, and that a Chinese orientated Korean satellite on the sensitive border region was worth fighting for. It would also demonstrate the Chinese strength, and give Mao a chance to pose as a defender of communism, which was important for his reputation and self-image both at home and abroad.First, we examine a different but revealing new development in the United Nations, as India takes the lead in proposing a ceasefire arrangement. Predictably, this proposal failed, but it anticipated India’s later activism in the name of a Korean peace deal, and to some American figures, Chinese willingness to discuss the measure signified that communism was not universal in its foreign policy. Far from following the same policy, China and the Soviets would pursue their own interests, and in early July Mao, unlike Stalin, was still willing to talk about peace, especially if such a deal enabled Chinese Communist representatives to sit in the UN General Assembly for the first time.In the meantime, Mao prepared for the worst, but it wasn’t until mid-August that the American intention to unify the peninsula was announced. This carefully timed announcement, coming as it did when the allied perimeter at Pusan was judged secure, forced Mao to dispense with peace talks and compelled him to advance his plans for an invasion of the North in support of Kim Il-sung. Now that the American-led UN coalition would be seeking the expulsion of Kim’s regime, Mao knew he could not allow the allies to succeed, for it would be disastrous to Chinese security and prestige. At the same time though, the Truman administration continued to send Mao mixed signals, as the countdown towards the Inchon landings began.******Music used:“Go To Work You Jerk”, by Benny Bell released in 1948, available: https://archive.org/details/BennyBellSPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 37 Minutes 12 Aug 2018

Episode 32: Chinese Whispers follows on from Truman’s speech requesting those yummy defence budget increases, by rolling our coverage back to the immediate aftermath of the American intentions to intervene which were announced on 26th June 1950. For Mao Zedong, our main focus for the next two episodes, the really aggravating aspect of Washington’s policy wasn’t that the Yanks were suddenly supporting Seoul with more enthusiasm – it was instead the fact that America now identified Taiwan as being part of this policy of support. They moved their fleet in between the Taiwan Straits, it was said, to prevent Chiang Kai-shek from intervening and breaking open the limited war, but Mao read between the lines, and believed that the act was done to interfere and jeopardise Chinese Communist interests, rather than protect the fragile Asian peace.Here we examine the Chinese leader’s fears and plans during the first half of 1950 and then his responses to the numerous challenges to the Chinese position immediately after the outbreak of the war. We question what the Chinese planned to do in Korea, how they viewed the conflict and what Beijing expected the US to do. We also see how transparent the allied plans for Korea were, and how MacArthur’s supposedly top secret brainchild was so well-known, even the Times was hinting at an Inchon landing to turn the tables against Pyongyang. Under such circumstances, and in light of what we’ve learned in the last few episodes, Mao’s attitude towards Korea suffered a series of shocks, and before long Stalin was requesting that the Chinese intervene in force to aid the Northern invasion which he had helped to sabotage. This episode collects together several threads then, and sees the Americans resume their more belligerent policy towards the Chinese after some weeks of appeasement; in early August, MacArthur appeared on Taiwan and began to converse with Mao’s mortal enemy Chiang Kai-shek. The message was clear – the US was not a friend of Beijing, and the US knew how to hurt the Chinese. Mao began to prepare for intervention, and in the process walked right into the trap so carefully laid by both the Soviets and Americans.**********Music used:“Mama Goes Where Papa Goes”, by Isabelle Patricola, released in 1923, available: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Isabelle_Patricola/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_04072015/Mama_Goes_Where_Papa_Goes_-_Isabelle_PatricolaSPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 34 Minutes 05 Aug 2018

Episode 31: Laying Down The Gauntlet looks at the other side of the coin and how the Americans reacted to the developing war in the late summer of 1950. MacArthur attempted to follow War Plan SL-17, which stipulated that a landing at Inchon should take place in response to a Northern surge down the peninsula, but problems existed in this plan, and MacArthur faced a conundrum throughout July 1950 as he tried to adapt to the curious nature of the communist advance. Pusan, it was clear, would be the holding action, and the test of allied mettle before reinforcements arrived.What was also clear in the Truman administration was that the time was right to present its first of many appeals to the public and to Congress. The policy aim of NSC 68 and the requirements within the defence budget necessitated that the President acted fast and did not hesitate to request, in consideration of the urgent state of affairs in Korea, some emergency funding increases. In addition, the apparently contradictory policy of appeasement towards the Chinese was adopted.This, as we’ll see, was pursued only because of the momentary vulnerability of the defenders at Pusan – if the Chinese intervened now, in late July-early August, all would surely be lost. Far better it would be to see the Chinese involve themselves AFTER the reinforcements had arrived and triumphs had been achieved. This, indeed, was the outcome eventually reaches. Little did Mao Zedong know, while he cautiously welcomed the allied approaches and watched the conflict unfold on the peninsula somewhat nervously, that all was proceeding according to the plans of everyone but his own.********Music used:“While They Were Dancing Around”, by Eddie Morton released in 1914. Available: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Eddie_Morton/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_04282015/While_They_Were_Dancing_Around_-_Eddie_Morton SPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 31 Minutes 02 Aug 2018

We return with part 6 of our series on 17th century warfare, and in this episode we have something very special for you guys – an examination of the sick man of Europe, before he was sick, but when he was certainly maligned and looked down upon. For some time, it has been supposed that the Ottoman Empire could not keep pace with Western Europe, and that her eclipse by the West European powers in the 1700s was an inevitable, rational process which can be partially explained by the Turk’s reluctance to accept new technological advances. Yet, as we’ll learn here, this generalisation against the Turks is as unfair as it is unfounded.The Ottoman Empire possessed one of the most advanced organisational and administrative systems in the world at the dawn of the 17th century. She was equipped with some of the most educated military minds, and had on site some of the best facilities for producing the weapons of war which he soldiers needed. This was not a sick man of Europe, nor did the patient show any signs of illness – far from it. The Turk was the envy of the continent thanks to the immense successes and accomplishments of her Sultans and soldiers, and it was partially to explain away these successes that the more unflattering myths about the Turk’s barbarity did the rounds.In this episode we’ll learn what the Turk was truly capable of, and why he made use of certain weapons which were shown to be obsolete in other parts of Europe. The Military Revolution, as we’ll see, was not the blanket theory which could be universally applied to all – advancements in technology did not arrive evenly to the continent, and even when they did, these advancements were affected by the circumstances on the ground, and issues as simple as whether Tartars were more comfortable firing a technically obsolete bow, than picking up a more ‘modern’ carbine. So I hope you’ll join me here history friends, while we examine the Turk’s prowess in the detail it deserves. Thanksss!SPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available!... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 36 Minutes 29 Jul 2018

Episode 30: Unfriendly Fire switches gears from the Anglo-American to the Asian angle in the war. We encounter some more controversial points, as we learn just how instrumental Stalin was in blunting the force of the North Korean People's Army, as he manipulated the situation to acquire the war he wanted. Stalin was creating in Korea a war which would draw the allies in further, and which would force the Chinese to respond. With this in mind, he couldn't afford to watch the North actually push the allies off the peninsula and effectively win the war.In previous episodes, we've made the point that Stalin wanted a certain kind of war, but in my mind, this evidence here proves that Stalin was utterly committed to sabotaging Kim Il-sung after leading him to believe that the war would take a certain shape. Kim, much like the Chinese and Stalin believed, the Americans, were pawns in his game to gather greater power and influence for himself. We thus see for ourselves that the Northern failures were less to do with allied preparations or Northern mistakes, but Stalin's deliberate actions. Controversial for sure, but in this window of time that the North had to close the war in its favour, Stalin needed to be sure that everything went according to plan, and that the war would not end just yet.************Music used:We return to the American Heart Association and Jo Stafford for another another song, and you can find the collection of audio I used for that series here: https://archive.org/details/1950-1959RadioNewsSPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our website and sign up to our Newsletter For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 46 Minutes 22 Jul 2018

Episode 29: With Allies Like These looks further at the Anglo-American relationship from where we left off last time. After July 1950, the British were militarily committed to Korea under the auspices of the United Nations, and under the command of General Douglas MacArthur. If these facts made Britons nervous, these nerves were not soothed by the repeated examples of where the two allies differed in their attitudes towards the theatre.The British were hesitant to invest too much resources in a region where they could construe little benefit, and they, unlike Washington, could not afford to anger the Chinese, whom they had recognised and wished to retain a favourable trading partnership with. These differences led to some stunning scenes, such as British intransigence in the United Nations General Assembly nearly forcing the British to vote on the side of the Soviets! These scenes and more come under our microscope here, as we examine the often fraught but desperately needed Anglo-American alliance as it traversed the perils of the Korean War.The sheer amount of content we have to cover means that Episode 29 is the largest yet, but I hope you will also agree that it is one of the most interesting, as we challenge the idea that the British and Americans remained on good terms throughout the postwar era. Certainly, it would all come crashing down quite painfully for Britain in 1956, but until that point, cracks were already beginning to show in the Anglo-American axis.*******Music used:We look at a 1950 radio program in support of the American Heart Association, where Jo Stafford, 'American Singing Sensation', gives us a quality gem. Giving the link for this specific song is tricky, since it came as a part of a big audio bundle of a radio archive, but the link is available here: https://archive.org/details/1950-1959RadioNewsSPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 35 Minutes 20 Jul 2018

1956 is surging forwards, and Part 1 is nearly complete! It has been a long time since I released one of these teaser episodes, showing you what awaits you in the $5 per month Xtra feed, so I thought I'd make up for lost time by releasing this here. Within this episode you can find sneaky previews of episodes 9, 10, 11 and 12 of 1956, so what are you waiting for! To listen to our most well-received patreon exclusive series yet, make sure you check this out.To those that want to access these episodes in full, you know what to do! Head over to the Patreon page now, and feast upon historical goods already in the feed, and so many more to come.I want more 1956! // What is 1956? // Read the blog post on 1956! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 37 Minutes 15 Jul 2018

You can find American Moments here. It's a history podcast bringing you more of the history from America which you love, but may have forgotten...Episode 28: London Stalling, introduces us to the British participation in the Korean War, and how utterly transfixed on the American partnership Clement Atlee's administration was. A guiding reason why the British and their Commonwealth allies took part in the Korean War can be explained by the Anglo-American partnership, and the pressures felt in London to support Washington in Asia, even though their policies and interests frequently conflicted there.Several times, British and American allies butted heads over what to do in Korea, and the issue of how far to proceed once across the border and into North Korea was a very hot, sensitive topic as well. Once the Chinese intervened, the British felt all of their aims go up in smoke, and wished only to end the war as quickly as possible so that the defence of Western Europe could properly be organised. Rearmament, unlike in the US, was not a net positive for British policymakers, but a terrible cost, and it led to skimping on other plans such as the NHS in the name of the increasingly unpopular war. In this first of two part examination of the Anglo-American relationship in the Korean War, we see that initial optimism and passion for defending a victim of aggression soon degenerated into a campaign of diplomatic self-interest, and then into a dreary, messy stalemate which the British found they could not escape from.Yet, in summer 1950, it could not be known where the war would end up, and positivity, twinned with the defence of its ally's interests, moved the British government to invest itself heavily in Korea, even while the shadow of the Second World War still loomed large and visibly in the British consciousness, not to mention in the every day lives of its citizens. The British had won World War 2, but they had been made to feel like a defeated nation ever since. Now their government, for a variety of reasons, had committed itself to yet another conflict which it could not afford. This was a July Crisis in 1950, but it was one of a very different nature to that experienced 36 years before.*********Music used:"I Can't Escape From You", by Bing Crosby, released in 1936. Available:https://archive.org/…/78_i-cant-escape-from-you_bing-crosby…SPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 10 Minutes 12 Jul 2018

Those crazy folks over at Wondery have a podcast called American History Tellers, which you can find and subscribe to here.In this teaser, you can get a preview of what AHT has coming - namely, a six part series examining the American Revolution from several different perspectives. For an exploration of this pivotal event in world history which you won't get anywhere else, make sure you check out American History Tellers. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 44 Minutes 08 Jul 2018

Apologies for the birdsongs in advance...We've got a real treat for you in the latest episode of the Korean War guys, as niche diplomacy and underrated tales become our prime focus. Here we examine the tales of Turkey and New Zealand, and their journey towards intervention in the Korean War...Episode 27: Avengers Assemble tackles two fascinating case studies in the allied intervention in the Korean War. We ask here why did Turkey and New Zealand, two states well removed from the events going on in Korea, determine that it was within their national interests to become involved. The answers are as fascinating as they are important, because they remind us that Korea was not merely an isolated conflict, but was a part of the Cold War world.The interests of these two states, leagues apart in terms of historical and governmental legacies, were tied by surprisingly similar values. While it had been New Zealand soldiers that had once stormed the beaches of Turkey in 1915, now the two states were intertwined in this new game, and it was this new game that the United States, as much as the United Nations, played a pivotal role in.******Music used:"Galway Bay" by Bing Crosby, released in 1949. Lovely Bing visits us for a few musical gems in a few episodes, and we're very happy indeed to have him with us! Check out a great deal of his early stuff for free here: https://archive.org/details/78_galway-bay_bing-crosby-victor-young_gbia0019249aSPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our website and sign up to our... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 37 Minutes 06 Jul 2018

Our series on 17th century warfare continues with a look at how French armies were constituted, and how their attitudes towards certain tactics changed. We begin with an examination of the massive increases of European armies across the board, but we soon refine our focus, and examine the machinations of King Henry IV of France (r. 1594-1610), who made the most of new theories in infantry and cavalry tactics. The story is by no means a straightforward one of consistent, sensible progression. Instead, it is a tale of hard knocks and tough lessons, which inculcated within the French military thinkers a respect for new methods of making war, and a willingness to experiment and take ideas they appreciated from their Dutch and Swedish neighbours. Such developments say a great deal about the spread of new military theories in the West, as much as they provide a clear example of the interconnectedness of Europeans, who served in each other’s armies and swapped drill manuals in military institutions. It’s a story which I’m sure you’ll find fascinating, so come and join me for this latest instalment of 17th century warfare! Thanksss!*********SPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our website and sign up to our Newsletter For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 40 Minutes 01 Jul 2018

Within this episode we continue to surge ahead with our narrative of the Korean War through the lens of that body. We look at how it coped with the progress of the North Koreans throughout the summer, and how its members were eventually persuaded to pass a few important resolutions, and to send armed delegations of their own. In this episode, we see collective security come to life, and it is a fascinating sight to behold. We also touch on several things that we'll investigate in more detail in the future, such as MacArthur's meeting with Truman on Wake Island on 15th October, MacArthur's insistence on pushing forward to the Yalu in spite of the warnings, and MacArthur's shock at the situation changing so completely upon the Chinese intervention. All of these are points which we will tackle later on, but to demonstrate in a neat little bundle how the UN came to have such an impact on the Korean War, either through its Security Council or, following the return of the Soviets to that body in August, the publication of critical debates in the General Assembly. It would be the General Assembly that took the most active role in discussing and developing a negotiated end to the conflict, but in the last half of 1950, this first phase of the conflict was far too back and forth for anyone to guess where it would end. For now, those members of the United Nations that pledged troops did so for their own reasons, safe in the knowledge that such an act would endear their interests to the Americans, as much as it would validate the hopes of the UN and prove that collective security COULD work, so long as all involved could remain united and stand together in the face of aggression.*******Music used:"It Ain't Gonna Rain No Mo" by the International Novelty Orchestra in 1926. Available: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/International_Novelty_Orchestra/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_04282015/It_Aint_Gonna_Rain_No_Mo_-_International_Novelty_OrchestraSPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 36 Minutes 24 Jun 2018

Paul Kendrick's Korean War PodcastThis is in some sense a two-pronged episode, where we look first of all at the days between 27-30 June 1950, and explain how the Truman administration managed to manipulate the strategic situation on the Han River to its own ends. Then, once we bring our story up to 30 June, we deliver a kind of overview, where we examine the conflict between late June and September.This episode will give you a handy introduction to what course the war took, and for those unfamiliar with its sometimes confusing pace, hopefully here you'll have a few things cleared up. Expect lots of MacArthur, sneaking stuff and American soldiers being dropped right in the thick of it!**********Music:I'll See You In Cuba by Jack Kaufman, released in 1920. Available: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Jack_Kaufman/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_04282015/Ill_See_You_in_C-U-B-A_-_Jack_KaufmanSPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our website and sign up to our Newsletter For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 41 Minutes 19 Jun 2018

UNprecedented - get it, because UN = United Nations, and it's unprecedented because it's never happened before?! I'm a genius!Episode 24: UNprecedented looks at the role of the United Nations, which the US used, for a variety of reasons, to frame its intervention in Korea. Here we look at the key moments in the history of UN, and we chart its development over the late 1940s as it became more heavily involved in the issues of the post-war world. Many nations placed their faith and trust in this new order; it was eagerly hoped that it would not go the way of the League of Nations, and that the UN at least would not cower in the face of armed aggression. So it was that the UN, by summer 1950, had built upon a history of peaceful intervention, foreign debate and great expectations even before Washington determined to appeal through the UN for the act in Korea that was desired.Although it couldn't be known at this early stage what way the Korean War would go, it was believed that the best way to legitimise the American act would be to operate through this new body, for a variety of reasons. The two resolutions on 25th and 27th June will be here examined and placed in their proper context, as will the strange absence of the Soviet Union from the UN Security Council. With no Soviet veto, everything could proceed as planned, and in this episode we return the point of Stalin's end goal - that of uniting the West against communism in Korea, and then against the Chinese. These goals were possible thanks to the UN, and thus it has to be said, as it did before, Washington again made Stalin's job much easier than it would have been had he been forced to go it alone.As we'll note though, the US wasn't doing anything especially extraordinary by asking the UN to weigh in on the Korean issue. After all there had been Korean commissions sponsored and supported by the UN since after 1945, so it seemed only logical to many within the UN's many Korea bodies to approve of the defence of the South Korean regime, and to condemn the North in the strongest possible terms. Such condemnation, in time, would be used to justify still greater actions, and from these protocols would the several armed delegations from 16 different states emerge. All such developments were instigated here.********Music used: "Bring Back My Blushing Rose", by John Steel, published in 1921. Available:http://freemusicarchive.org/…/A…/Bring_Back_My_Blushing_RoseKorean War section of the websiteRemember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years WarAre you TeamFerdinand or acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 41 Minutes 17 Jun 2018

The Korean War is back with a bang!Episode 23: What Lies Beneath takes us to the halls of Washington, where as we saw in the last episode, the US was surprisingly slow to respond to the North Korean invasion. What kind of methods did the Truman administration make use of to achieve its policy goals? In this episode we will examine what lay beneath the shocked exterior of the American reaction to the invasion of South Korea. Far from surprised, everything was going according to plan. It remained to be seen if the South would hold firm, or if the US would have to implement those emergency measures prepared for in the weeks before.We turn our attention then to the issue of the Han River line, and to the question of when it would be ideal for the US to intervene with some military force to defend its disorientated Southern ally. If it moved too soon, then South Korea would potentially be saved the kind of conflict that Washington needed. It was essential that the US did not move too quickly then, but it would quickly become clear that an underestimation of the communists on a vast scale had taken place.Worse for the planners of the Truman administration, people were beginning to ask questions. If the CIA had furnished the administration with so much evidence regarding the Northern invasion, then how was it that nothing had been done to prepare or intercept this threat? The genuine reason could not be given of course, so the US instead moved to implement some damage control over 25th to 27th June, amidst the more public news abroad which saw the conditions of the Korean War escalate into a full blown problem, which only the United Nations, it seemed, could solve. On the surface it was all outrage and condemnation, but beneath this, the Truman administration was doing its utmost to ensure that its policy aims under NSC 68 were achieved. Let's see how they did...Music:Alcoholic Blues (1919) by Vernon Dalhart.Available from Free Music Archive: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Vernon_Dalhart/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_08252015/The_Alcoholic_BluesKorean War section of the websiteRemember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years WarAre you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt!Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available!Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 38 Minutes 12 Jun 2018

In our latest episode of 17th Century Warfare, we put the Military Revolution to the test, by applying a key aspect of it - the trace italienne system - to 17th century France! Expect talk of fortresses, historian John A Lynn and lots of talk about context....So...get ready to lay siege! In this episode we use the case study of French fortifications to examine the trace italienne, the name given to the modernisation of European fortifications along the Italian model. These forts had low, thick walls buttressed by large earthworks and supported by bastions which boasted interlocking fields of fire. The new developments in technology meant that the defenders could lay down a punishing amount of fire of their own, while the attacker would be forced to withstand this bombardment, and conduct his siege in the meantime. Developments in mining, in trench digging and in the size of armies necessary to police these trenches followed, and these issues will occupy much of our attention in this episode.If you ever wondered how the fortifications of early modern Europe kept up with the advancements in gunpowder technology and the increasing calibre of cannons, then this episode is for you! If you were curious about the technological race between the defender and the attacker, then this episode is for you too! If you were simply curious about how defensive works were garrisoned or effectively employed against an invading army – the mission of any state which faced war with another during this period – then yes, this episode is for YOU! I hope you’ll join me as we look through the French lens to better explain why siege warfare developed as it did. Thanksss!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!Visit the Thirty Years War section of the website.Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years WarAre you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt!Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available!Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our website and sign up to our NewsletterSPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 35 Minutes 10 Jun 2018

Time to get a bit technical, but I promise it'll be anything BUT boring!Get your thinking caps on history friends, because in this episode we’re going to assess the most important element of the historiography of the 17th century – the Military Revolution theory. The Military Revolution idea states that Europe underwent fundamental – you might even say ‘revolutionary’ changes during the late 1500s and 1600s. These changes were affected by improvements in military technology, and the adoption of weapons like the musket, the usage of proper infantry musket drills, and the creation of a new fortification system the trace italienne, which made the ballooning of armies essential if these modernised fortresses were to be effectively besieged.There is of course more to the Military Revolution thesis than that, and contradictions abound which we will absolutely be sinking our teeth into in the episodes to come. If you were sceptical or simply curious though, then this episode will give us a great grounding in the mechanics of the Military Revolution, so please don’t feel intimidated or put off by our mention of it! I promise it is a fascinating story which I genuinely got real enjoyment researching, so hopefully this will come across in the episode. Come and join me and see for yourself, as we pick our way through 17th century warfare!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!Visit the Thirty Years War section of the website.Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years WarAre you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt!Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our website and sign up to our NewsletterSPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 44 Minutes 05 Jun 2018

In my time my poor father was as diligent to teach me to shoot, as to learn me any other thing; and so I think other men did their children: he taught me how to draw, how to lay my body in my bow, and not to draw from strength of the body: I had my bows bought me, according to my age and strength; as I increased in them, so my bows were made bigger and bigger; for men shall never shoot well, except they be brought up in it…But now, we have taken up whoring in towns, instead of shooting in fields.These were the words of Hugh Lattimer when talking of the decline of English training standards with the longbow - an important theme in this episode. Trust me history friends, this is a good one! Herein we ask that important question - why did England swap its longbows for muskets over the 16th to 17th centuries, what did this process look like, and why did it take so flaming long?We trace the longbow’s dominance of English military thinking, and ask how it was that England swapped the longbow for the musket, when the musket was less reliable, more expensive and overall less effective. Did you know that longbows were only fully removed from English armies in 1595? Factoids such as these abound in this fascinating installment of our 17th century warfare series. It’s a long episode for sure, but I don’t doubt that you will enjoy every minute of it if even the idea of English longbowmen interests you. Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!Visit the Thirty Years War section of the website.Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years WarAre you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt!Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon, follow us on Twitter, visit our website and sign up to our Newsletter For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 36 Minutes 03 Jun 2018

{Don't panic! The Korean War is on a break, and will be back on 18th June}At long last! Our series on 17th century warfare has finally landed, with our first episode looking at…nothing to do with 17th century warfare…Hmmm. Not to worry history friends – untangling warfare in the 17th century requires a certain amount of background detail, and in this episode here we do exactly that. The feudal society and its relation to the military contract aren’t topics we would normally go anywhere near, but to lay the foundations for what’s to come, we need to establish what came first.In this episode we do this, using the case study of Medieval England as our baseline. Expect talk of how English Kings did war during the Middle Ages, and what challenges they faced and hoops they had to jump through in order to make going to war possible. These traditions were bound up in the expectations of feudal society which dictated that the King was always at the top of the pyramid, but not necessarily always obeyed or followed.Contradictions and exceptions abounded of course, but tracing the arc of development from medieval to early modern also provides us with the chance to examine another concept which will become key to this series – the Military Revolution. So jump right into this series here, and remember that part 2, which looks in more detail at the technological advances – specifically how England traded longbows for muskets – will be released on Wednesday! Thankssss!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!Visit the Thirty Years War section of the website.Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years WarAre you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt!Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon, follow us on Twitter, visit our website and sign up to our Newsletter For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 30 Minutes 27 May 2018

Our fifth introduction episode if you're counting those TALK episodes, in this episode here we actually get down to the meat and bones of what you can expect from this series, what its structure, release schedule and objectives will be, and of course, why you should be really excited for it! If you'd like to find out what I am planning and what this series holds in store for you, and perhaps why you should bother a second time round returning to this fascinating era, then hopefully once you have a listen here, I'll be able to convince you.If you want to be somewhat active with our Thirty Years War series, then please check out the links below, and remember that for $1 a month, YOU could access ad-free episodes of this series, complete with scripts so that you can follow what we get down and dirty about. For the fans of nitty gritty among us, the WAR FEED is for you! Thanksss, and I'll be seeing you all soon!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!Visit the Thirty Years War section of the website.Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years WarAre you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt!Don't forget of course that WDF is on Patreon, Twitter, its website and has a Newsletter For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 18 Minutes 27 May 2018

'This is a fight between God or the Devil. If his Majesty wants to side with God, he must join me. If he prefers to side with the Devil, then indeed he must fight me. There is no third way"Gustavus Adolphus may give us our podcast's theme, and our book's title, but there was much more to the Thirty Years War than the famed King of Sweden. In this introduction episode, we place you in the thick of this dilemma - neutrality was impossible, yet the consequences for picking one side or the other were potentially catastrophic, so how could those caught in the middle decide? To make our point, come with us to the sack of Magdeburg in may 1631, a city whose people chose the 'Devil' in the mind of the Imperialists, and paid the ultimate price, as the worst single atrocity of the conflict takes place. It's time to pick a side history friends, are you for God or the Devil?Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!Visit the Thirty Years War section of the website.Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years WarAre you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt!Don't forget of course that WDF is on Patreon, Twitter, its website and has a Newsletter For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 24 Minutes 23 May 2018

1618-2018 - on this day 400 years ago, one of the most destructive conflicts in human history erupted within the walls of Prague's Hradschin Castle. As we recount here, the conflict was neither all the fault of the Bohemians, nor sustained by them for very long. Instead, several factors prolonged the conflict and kept Europe in rapture for three decades. For the next year or so, we here at WDF want to bring you on a journey into this conflict, on a scale and with an attention to detail which you have never known before.We start on that morning - it's just after 8AM on the morning of 23rd May, 1618, and you've agreed to meet a friend of yours. The two of you, along with several others, have agreed to do something radical...**********Visit the Thirty Years War section of the websiteRemember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!Don't forget of course that WDF is on Patreon, Twitter, its website and has a Newsletter For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 54 Minutes 18 May 2018

Back again with the second part of our TALK episode, which concludes the analysis of the Thirty Years War timeline in the typical style which only a TALK episode can manage! Here we take the story from 1635 and discuss several battles, characters and important diplomatic developments before concluding on the Peace of Westphalia. Hopefully this will get you pumped for all the content that is to come!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!Don't forget of course that WDF is on Patreon, Twitter, its website and has a Newsletter For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 62 Minutes 18 May 2018

Happy birthday to us! When Diplomacy Fails is 6 years old today, and to celebrate we're jumping right into the Thirty Years War once again, with another intro episode (2/5) this one looking at the timeline of the conflict up to the year 1635, but with a twist. I'm not by myself this time - today I am joined by TALK episode guest Sean. Far too much happens to really summarise here, but as usual, skip ahead past the BEFIT rundown for the bulk of the episode, and make sure to let me know what you thought.'Back on the podcast...'Visit the Thirty Years War section of the websiteRemember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!Don't forget of course that WDF is on Patreon, Twitter, its website and has a Newsletter For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 34 Minutes 13 May 2018

We're jumping back into the Thirty Years War and this is all super exciting, but to some of you guys it may also be a tad overwhelming, as a lot of unfamiliar stuff is about to be thrown at you. With that in mind, this episode is designed to familiarise you with the main themes, the most important figures, and the most active powers in Europe at the time.We'll learn a bit about the constitution of the Holy Roman Empire, meet the Habsburg family, and take a gander at some other related issues in Europe at the time of the outbreak of the conflict in 1618.As we launch into this exciting new period in WDF, make sure you visit the dedicated section of our website for Thirty Years War related goods by following the link here: Take me to the Thirty Years War section This site is where you'll also be able to freely access the script for this episode, and a document detailing all of the social media posts, so don't delay if you like some context and reading!Make sure also that you sign up on Patreon to get all of the incoming episodes ad-free and complete with a script for each episode, for just $1 a month! https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 8 Minutes 09 May 2018

American Innovations is the new show from Wondery, and in this sponsored ad for that new show, I inform you what you can expect from it, as well as provide you with a teaser of that show to whet your appetite. American Innovations is all about the history of science, discovery and technology, and about capturing those 'ah ha' eurika moments that made human history tick, so make sure you check them out by following the link below!wondery.fm/diplomacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 39 Minutes 06 May 2018

You should know about our new sponsor - onlinegreatbooks.com! To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to...https://intellectuallinearprogression.com/when-diplomacy-fails/?level=1&discount_code=dipEpisode 22: Crossing the Rubicon looks at the moment where the North invades, and the different pieces fall into place for some, and fall apart for others. At 4AM on 25th June 1950, the buildup, all the preparation, all the pressuring and all the lies produced their anticipated outcome. In more force than anyone could have expected, North Korea invaded its Southern neighbour and instigated what appeared to be a catastrophic collapse in Southern defences. Syngman Rhee, it seems, had been right to warn his American allies of his country's vulnerable state.The ROKA proved useless in the face of the North's veteran troops, many of whom had served in the Chinese Civil War for several years.We follow from the perspective of Paik Sun Yup, who began the war as a Colonel, he would end it as one of the highest ranking military personnel in Korea. His war was only beginning, The nightmare for Korea was only beginning, as the war which has flummoxed and fascinated people for many decades since erupted across the 38th parallel.******Music used:"My Pillow and Me", by Lizzie Myles in 1923. Available:http://freemusicarchive.org/…/Antique_Phon…/My_Pillow_And_MeSign up to our NEWSLETTER for the latest news and deals! In April and May subscribers get 20% OFF my Thirty Years War book, so don't delay! sign up here: https://mailchi.mp/a0d49eec863c/wdfpodcastWant to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF15 to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, shop, website, source materials and Patreon below.History Podcasting Platform:http://www.wdfpodcast.com/history-podcasting-platform/Official shop where you can pick up all manner of podcast-related goodies: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/shop/Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enSupport us financially on Patreon and access an ad-free episodes ($2 per month) and an hour of extra content ($5 per month): https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsVisit the website: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/Visit the blog: acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 47 Minutes 01 May 2018

Make sure you check out the Human Circus - Journeys in the Medieval World, if you're a fan of fascinating stories and a well told narratives. Devon is a history friend and a proud member of the History Podcasting Platform, so show him some love and check his brilliant pod out! https://humancircuspodcast.com/You can also subscribe to his show on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/human-circus-histories/id1194921513?mt=2&ls=1Episode 21: In Support of My Thesis is a kind of culmination of all we've learned so far. It's also a recap of our findings and my theses for this series. What do I believe, and why do I believe it, and how do I respond to some other scholars who claim that the Korean War began for different reasons? All of these are questions I grapple with here, so if you like your debates historical be sure to stop by. Remember as well that you can access the Bibliography for this show at any time by heading over to http://www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/Throughout this episode we delve into the arguments and conclusions of several historians, and we rationalise our findings by asking you guys a set of hypothetical questions. Let's just say that if you were unconvinced about how we got to our conclusions and why, you should find this episode here very persuasive, and hopefully effective in conveying my points of view. Make sure as ever that you guys let me know what you think! Do you side with the conventional explanations, given by a guy like Max Hastings, (pictured), or are you looking for something more? Have a listen, and see where you stand.*******Music used: "Lonesome Road Blues" by the Blue Ridge Duo, 1924, available: https://archive.org/details/EDIS-SRP-0196-03Sign up to our NEWSLETTER for the latest news and deals! In April and May subscribers get 20% OFF my Thirty Years War book, so don't delay! sign up here: https://mailchi.mp/a0d49eec863c/wdfpodcastWant to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF15 to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, shop, website, source materials and Patreon below.History Podcasting Platform:http://www.wdfpodcast.com/history-podcasting-platform/Official shop where you can pick up all manner of podcast-related goodies: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/shop/Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enSupport us financially on Patreon and access an ad-free episodes ($2 per month) and an hour of extra content ($5 per month): acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 39 Minutes 29 Apr 2018

Make sure to give a warm welcome to our featured history podcast through the History Podcasting Platform: Noah Tetzner, and his History of Vikings Podcast. You can find Noah's excellent podcast here: http://thehistoryofvikings.com/author/noahtetzner/Subscribe on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-history-of-vikings/id1363609926Episode 20: Korean Background Part 3 concludes our examination of the Korean elements of the Korean War, by looking at the events which shaped the peninsula North and South between 1945-50. These were years of trouble, of building political bases and of tackling the inherent problems which each zone posed. Cultures of corruption, of political difference and of nationalism would all have to be adapted in this divided world. In the midst of these changes we also see the role which the many institutions of the United Nations had in bringing Korea back together on a basis which would be acceptable to both sides. In the late 1940s, it was far from certain that the division in Korea would be permanent. Since both Moscow and Washington were by now far more occupied with events going on in Western Europe, where events like the Berlin Blockade and the Prague Coup dominated, it was unsurprising that both had little time for affairs in Korea. In time though, as this episode shows, both sides saw the value in holding onto their zone, even while this act required some additional investment, and a consistent support of their favoured candidate, who didn't necessarily have the support of the country behind him. These years, indeed, show us what the Korean origins to the Korean War were, and how it was that over 100,000 Koreans had lost their lives in an undeclared civil war on the peninsula before the outbreak of war in June 1950.****************Music used: "Good Bye Sweet Old Manhattan Isle" by Harry Tally, released in 1909, a must for anyone who wants an atmospheric, patriotic and nostalgic look at America's city so nice, they named it twice! Available: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Harry_Tally/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_02102015/Good_Bye_Sweet_Old_Manhattan_Isle_-_Harry_Tally************Sign up to our NEWSLETTER for the latest news and deals! In April and May subscribers get 20% OFF my Thirty Years War book, so don't delay! sign up here: https://mailchi.mp/a0d49eec863c/wdfpodcastWant to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF15 to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, shop, website, source materials and Patreon below.History Podcasting Platform:http://www.wdfpodcast.com/history-podcasting-platform/Official shop where you can pick up all manner of podcast-related goodies: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/shop/Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter:... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 39 Minutes 22 Apr 2018

There's an awful lot to get into here, but we have to start somewhere! In this episode, I explain why my plans have effectively gone up in smoke, and what I plan to do to rectify these new developments. Expect announcements on the future of Poland Is Not Yet Lost, 1956, the Korean War, the Age of Bismarck, the Versailles Anniversary Project, and a new body of work that I will be springing on you guys from 23rd May - the Thirty Years War.That's right! To mark the fact that it's the 400th anniversary of the Defenestration of Prague, on 23rd May 2018 we will be launching a new series, but NOT a new podcast. Instead, you'll be able to get it all in one place. Find out my rationale for that, as well as several other points in this episode; where does Cambridge fit into everything, are we making too much content, what's special about this revamped Thirty Years War series and SO MUCH MORE! If you're a fan of reading, make sure you check out the blog post which will shed further light on the situation:http://www.wdfpodcast.com/thevassalstate/impstatesAs always, thanksss so much for your patience and support, and I am genuinely sorry and very peeved that Poland has had to be postponed. Hopefully, after listening in here, you'll agree that it was for the best.Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War by clicking hereCheck out the newsletter too! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 33 Minutes 19 Apr 2018

Episode 2 follows on from where our first episode left off. Here, the power struggle between the Soviet Union’s top men is in full swing, and power plays, character assassination, genuine assassination and even more tactics besides distinguish this period of post-Stalin Soviet history. The end result – Nikita Khrushchev’s victorious succession and confirmation as First Secretary – was far from certain once the struggle began, but as his rivals continued to underestimate him, and as he worked to build up his power base while the big fish sniped at one another, Khrushchev emerged as the best candidate to fill Stalin’s murderous shoes. Yet, it was far from clear at the same time exactly what Khrushchev had in mind.For one, the so-called Thaw had been on-going since Stalin’s death, as prisoners were released, trumped up charges commuted, and some of the more unpopular policies relaxed. Would Khrushchev make efforts to expand upon this approach to Soviet rule, or would he contain its potential dangers as soon as he was in a position to do so? The different possibilities for life after Stalin remind us that what followed and what opened the year 1956 was by no means the only course, yet it was the most radical option at the time.The act of building towards that infamous event in Khrushchev’s tenure of rule – the secret speech – thus occupies a great deal of our time here. Of most interest to us here though is the spectacle of Khrushchev’s elimination of his rivals, either through execution or political neutralisation. As far as Khrushchev was concerned, while a collective leadership on paper looked nice, in reality, there could be only one...**************Sign up to our NEWSLETTER for the latest news and deals! In April and May subscribers get 20% OFF my Thirty Years War book, so don't delay! sign up here: https://mailchi.mp/a0d49eec863c/wdfpodcastWant to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF15 to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, shop, website, source materials and Patreon below.History Podcasting Platform:http://www.wdfpodcast.com/history-podcasting-platform/Official shop where you can pick up all manner of podcast-related goodies: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/shop/Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enSupport us financially on Patreon and access an ad-free episodes ($2 per month) and an hour of extra content ($5 per month): https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsVisit the website: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/Visit the blog: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/thevassalstate/Look at our sources: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/Remember spreading the word by telling a history friend about us is still the most effective way to spread the history love! Thanksss :D For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 32 Minutes 19 Apr 2018

Our first episode of the EXCLUSIVE series 1956 is out now! To give you a taster of what’s to come, this first episode and its follow up are absolutely FREE for all listeners, but episode 3 onwards will require you guys to sign up for the bargain price of just $5 a month to join in the party. By paying $5 a month, you’ll not only secure your place as a valued history friend, you’ll also guarantee that you get the best of WDF, the earliest access and of course, access to future exclusive series like the Age of Bismarck! Above all, you’ll be helping to ensure that I can continue to do this as part of my living, and you’ll be making history thrive in the process.Above all you should notice, as per some previous announcements, that this podcast series is moving to a new address! 1956 will have its own RSS feed and its own home within the WDF podcast group, soon to be joined by many more, as you’ll soon see! This way, 1956 can serve as a constant advertisement for the benefits of becoming a Diplomat, but it also means that we don’t clog up the feed with any 1956 episodes. My OCD senses are pleased, but your history senses should be well pleased too! Remember that all Patrons can even help out further by giving a review in 1956’s new home if you are enjoying the series. Now then, you may be wondering – what does 1956 have to offer? What exactly is in the box?Well, if you want to learn more about what followed after the Korean War – as a story and as a year of significance, 1956 has few equals, and we open our narrative with the event which set up all subsequent events – the death of Josef Stalin on 5th March 1953. As far as deaths of prominent characters go, the death of Stalin from a succession of strokes at the age of 73 sticks out particularly – a man who allowed his paranoia get the better of him, out of fear of his own vulnerability and out of lust for power, died without being the victim of any underhanded scheme. As we’ll see, he also died without naming an official successor, throwing into chaos those men who had stuck around long enough to accumulate some power for themselves.In this episode we’ll meet these figures – the so-called ‘collective leadership’ of the Soviet Union, which included such heavy hitters as Molotov, Malenkov, Lavrenti Beria, Anastas Mikoyan and a sometimes crude, always blunt figure by the name of Nikita Khrushchev. The story of what would come after Stalin is a gripping and fascinating snapshot of life at the top of the Soviet greasy pole. It prepares us for the eventful months which are to come, by investigating exactly what it was that compelled these men to undo some of what Stalin had made, while still holding onto the terrifying edifice which held half of the continent of Europe in rapture. I hope you’ll join me – and a huge thanksss for all your support so far!******************************Sign up to our NEWSLETTER for the latest news and deals! In April and May subscribers get 20% OFF my Thirty Years War book, so don't delay! sign up here: https://mailchi.mp/a0d49eec863c/wdfpodcastWant to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF15 to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, shop, website, source materials and Patreon below.History Podcasting Platform:http://www.wdfpodcast.com/history-podcasting-platform/Official shop where you can pick up all manner of podcast-related goodies: acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 15 Minutes 19 Apr 2018

1956 is divided into two parts, the first tackles the question of life after Stalin, the second examines the run up to the Suez Crisis. Here in our introduction to Part 1, we'll see what we're dealing with when we attempt to delve into a world that had just lost its most dominating personality. Could the Soviet Union endure life after Stalin? What would it look like now that it was led by a collective leadership? Could this collective leadership possibly last? Let's find out, and remember to check out the other two episodes of Part 1 here as well, entitled 1.1 and 1.2.*********************Sign up to our NEWSLETTER for the latest news and deals! In April and May subscribers get 20% OFF my Thirty Years War book, so don't delay! sign up here: https://mailchi.mp/a0d49eec863c/wdfpodcastWant to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF15 to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, shop, website, source materials and Patreon below.History Podcasting Platform:http://www.wdfpodcast.com/history-podcasting-platform/Official shop where you can pick up all manner of podcast-related goodies: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/shop/Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enSupport us financially on Patreon and access an ad-free episodes ($2 per month) and an hour of extra content ($5 per month): https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsVisit the website: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/Visit the blog: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/thevassalstate/Look at our sources: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/Remember spreading the word by telling a history friend about us is still the most effective way to spread the history love! Thanksss :D For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 30 Minutes 19 Apr 2018

What's this then? Well history friend this is 1956! And it's here because, after trying to start a new feed with these sample episodes in it, I decided it just wasn't working, and that it would be better to do something more sensible, and plonk them in the regular WDF feed, so here we are!1956 - The Eventful Year is a brand new series designed to bring you closer to the events of this incredible year in history. While on the surface, 1956 may appear like any other year of the 20th century - perhaps with less to offer than many other candidates - it is in fact rich with intrigue, fascinating characters,struggles, triumphs and tragedies. This series is actually a PATREON exclusive series, for supporters of this podcast at the $5 level or higher on When Diplomacy Fails' Patreon page. However, all listeners here will be able to listen, for free, to four episodes out of this exclusive series. Two of which will be available from launch day.The question of what 1956 actually is can be answered by a quick gander at its structure - the series will be split into two distinct parts, since so much goes on, it only makes sense to approach the year in this way. The first part examines life after Stalin, and asks what happened in the Soviet Union when Nikita Khrushchev assumed power. The second part traces the eruption of the Suez Crisis, largely from the British perspective.****************If you're interested in learning more about WDF, then you know where to go!Sign up to our NEWSLETTER for the latest news and deals! In April and May subscribers get 20% OFF my Thirty Years War book, so don't delay! sign up here: https://mailchi.mp/a0d49eec863c/wdfpodcastWant to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF15 to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, shop, website, source materials and Patreon below.History Podcasting Platform:http://www.wdfpodcast.com/history-podcasting-platform/Official shop where you can pick up all manner of podcast-related goodies: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/shop/Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enSupport us financially on Patreon and access an ad-free episodes ($2 per month) and an hour of extra content ($5 per month): https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsVisit the website: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/Visit the blog: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/thevassalstate/Look at our sources: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/Remember spreading the word by telling a history friend about us is still the most effective way to spread the history love! Thanksss :D For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 35 Minutes 15 Apr 2018

Episode 19: Korean Background Part 2 picks up where we left off last time with an examination of Syngman Rhee, by examining his counterpart up North. Who was Kim Il-sung, and where did he come from to assume a position of unrivalled power in Pyongyang by 1950? Was this rise all by accident, or exclusively by Soviet design, and what was it that recommended Kim to Stalin in the first place? All of these are critical questions which we will examine here, as one of the leading antagonists of our narrative is brought out into the open, freed from his mythical bubble.The story of Kim is one of the creation of Korean nationalism, as much as it the creation of the Korean Communist Party, which won only 4% of the vote in the Soviet zone in 1946. This would never do, and the ascent of Kim Il-sung had much to do with his passionate zeal for communism, as much as it with his loyalty to Stalin. Both qualities would be greatly tested over the next few years, but they would also enable Kim to manoeuvre himself and his family into an unprecedented position of leadership and control. The seeds of this position were already being planted here.*******Music used:"Golden Slippers", by the Fisk Jubilee Singers, released in 1909. Don't let its age fool you - this golden gem is not only my wife's favourite tune, it's also super catchy! Have a listen to get in the mood, and make sure you track it down at its home by going to: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Fisk_University_Jubilee_Quartet/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_02032015/Golden_Slippers_-_Fisk_University_Jubilee_Quartet****************Sign up to our NEWSLETTER for the latest news and deals! In April and May subscribers get 20% OFF my Thirty Years War book, so don't delay! sign up here: https://mailchi.mp/a0d49eec863c/wdfpodcastWant to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF15 to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, shop, website, source materials and Patreon below.History Podcasting Platform:http://www.wdfpodcast.com/history-podcasting-platform/Official shop where you can pick up all manner of podcast-related goodies: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/shop/Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enSupport us financially on Patreon and access an ad-free episodes ($2 per month) and an hour of extra content ($5 per month): https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsVisit the website: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/Visit the blog: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/thevassalstate/Look at our sources: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/Remember spreading the word by telling a history friend about us is still the most effective way to... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 37 Minutes 08 Apr 2018

NEW: Subscribe to WDF's newsletter for a weekly update on the latest in WDF, exclusive deals, stories, quizzes, perspectives and so much more that you won't get anywhere else. Cut through the cr@p and AXXESS the history with our weekly telegram service. Simply click on the link provided and add your email, and WALLAH!Link: https://mailchi.mp/a0d49eec863c/wdfpodcastEpisode 18: Korean Background Part 1 examines, oddly enough, the background in Korea before the war broke out, in the early years of Syngman Rhee's career. Rhee's life existed in the backdrop of the creeping Japanese influence in Korea, as the peninsula was passing from a Chinese to a Japanese satellite in the late 19th century. All the while, Russian tensions with the Japanese also escalated, and Rhee found himself trapped in a homeland with few friends, and many predators.At 30 years old in the early years of the century, Rhee began his auspicious journey to the US, where he gathered up several degrees and distinguished himself, before returning home as a missionary of all things, just as the Japanese were preparing to annex the region. Rhee's departure in 1910 signalled a watershed moment in his life - for the next 35 years, Rhee would remain an American resident, tirelessly campaigning for the rights of Koreans to independence, as his calls fell on mostly deaf ears. Not until 1945, when he was needed as a Westernised, English speaking Korean person, would Rhee be called upon by the US.We conclude the episode by examining the arrival of the two sides in the peninsula in 1945, and the decision made thereafter to divide Korea along the 38th parallel. It was a decision taken, we'll see, without any consultation with the Korean people, and it was also a decision taken entirely with the interests of the US and Soviets in mind. Time would tell exactly how important this dividing line would be, but for now, it sufficed to keep everyone quiet, if not happy.************Music used: Georgie Price, Morning Will Come, 1923. Available: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Georgie_Price/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_03242015/Morning_Will_Come_-_Georgie_PriceWant to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF15 to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, shop, website, source materials and Patreon below.History Podcasting Platform: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/history-podcasting-platform/Official shop where you can pick up all manner of podcast-related goodies: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/shop/Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enSupport us financially on Patreon and access an ad-free episodes ($2 per month) and an hour of extra content ($5 per month): https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsVisit the website: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/Visit the blog: acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 31 Minutes 01 Apr 2018

NEW: Subscribe to WDF's newsletter for a weekly update on the latest in WDF, exclusive deals, stories, quizzes, perspectives and so much more that you won't get anywhere else. Cut through the cr@p and AXXESS the history with our weekly telegram service. Simply click on the link provided and add your email, and WALLAH!Link: https://mailchi.mp/a0d49eec863c/wdfpodcastEpisode 17: The Balancing Act contains several fascinating nuggets, as the US did its best to balance the needs of its policy towards South Korea - the luring of its enemies there into a false sense of security by making the regime vulnerable - with its real strategic concerns if the North made use of its increasingly powerful armoured columns. In spite of Syngman Rhee's pleas in the months before, the anti-tank capabilities of the ROK Army were insufficient at best, and there was a real danger that if the North pushed south with its abundance of T34s, it would roll up everything that the allies had to offer.In such circumstances, we are also introduced to War Plan SL-17, a detailed dossier on how to act in the event of a war in Korea, developed by the US government in early June 1950, in other words, only a few weeks before the invasion was launched. This War Plan also detailed the defence in the Pusan Perimeter which was later made famous by heroic allied actions, but also "an amphibious landing at Inchon to cut enemy supply lines". Far from General MacArthur's brainchild, the Inchon landings were in fact put to paper many months before, all as a response to the fears that the North was capable of defeating the allies on the peninsula before the wider goal of NSC68 could be pursued.This is our final analysis of American policies towards Korea before the shooting begins, and it is rife with some last minute considerations, as war preparations in late June 1950 reach a fever pitch. Having crafted and prepared this policy, it was essential that Washington not mess up this late in the game - the risk was high, but the endgoal of containment required that Korea be a theatre of risk. If the allies could stand fast in the initial attack, then the subsequent response would hopefully cover up any bad taste that the initial allied failures left. Hopes and aims were thus a dime a dozen in the final days of peace; it remained to be seen exactly how secure the American position was. A succession of punches, some of them in the public sphere, some on the battlefield, and some in the upper echelons of government and military command, were soon to land, and then, a new balancing act would begin.*******"Good Morning Mr Zip-Zip-Zip", by Eugene Buckley and the Peerless Quartet, released in 1918. The song refers plainly to the composition and haircuts of the armies. In light of what's about to come in Korea, I felt it was appropriate! You can get it for free here: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Eugene_Buckley_and_Peerless_Quartette/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_03242015/Good_Morning_Mr_Zip-ZipZip_-_Eugene_Buckley_and_Peerless_Quartette************Want to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, shop, website, source materials and Patreon below.Official shop where you can pick up all manner of podcast-related goodies: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/shop/Facebook page: acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 39 Minutes 25 Mar 2018

Episode 16: Selective Perspective examines further the American policy towards South Korea in late spring 1950. We open the episode with the arrival of America's ambassador to South Korea John J Muccio (pictured) returning home, to plead in person for the things that Seoul desperately needed. While Muccio did this, the Truman administration set about crafting a perfectly coordinated image of its approach to South Korea, be that through suggestive magazine interviews or tactically ignoring Muccio's recommendations, while giving the impression that he had been listened to.If the order of the day was to stall Muccio, and to momentarily ease Syngman Rhee's fears, then it was mission accomplished.As the Truman administration well understood, their policy towards Korea was being watched by the communists, and any signs of hesitation, of a reluctant or unwillingness to support Rhee's regime could all be construed as signals that Washington wouldn't put up much of a fight if the North invaded. This was what Kim Il-sung wanted to hear, and it was also exactly what Washington wanted him to hear. Faced with these bits of evidence, Kim would invade South Korea convinced of the American weakness and hesitation, only to face a total buzzsaw.The US did have some cause for concern though, when intelligence was received that underlined the sheer number of armoured columns collecting in North Korea. While they required a Northern invasion and an allied holding action, there was a danger that the North would push the allies off the peninsula entirely if the hundreds of T34 tanks burst over the 38th parallel. Thus, Washington engaged in some other policies, seemingly at odds with their plan to sabotage South Korea's defensive capabilities. Task forces, air and naval forces and other preparations would be made. Even while it would seem that the US was unprepared when the North attacked, the arrival of more soldiers in the nick of time in several areas would, hopefully, be enough to plug the gaps. Any suspicion about the American response was a matter of perspective.******Music used:"Shaving Cream" by Benny Bell, released in 1946. Today we have a real gem for you guys - the first true double entendre song of its time, Shaving Cream is...well...you just have to have a listen yourself to see what it's all about. As a tune it remains one of my favourite of the series, and is supremely catchy, I'm sure you'll agree. You can get it for free here:https://archive.org/details/BennyBellWant to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, shop website, source materials and Patreon below.Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enSupport us financially on Patreon and access an ad-free episodes ($2 per month) and an hour of extra content ($5 per month): https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsVisit the website: acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 38 Minutes 23 Mar 2018

Episode 15: Ignorance Is Bliss examines the behaviour of the US towards its South Korean ally. Since the American strategy was now to lure North Korea into attacking, we'll see in this episode exactly how determined the Truman administration was to chronically underfund and jeopardise the security of Seoul. Ignoring the protests, concerns and urgency professed even by some of its own State Department staff, the US behaved as though it had no concept of what was happening in South Korea in spring 1950, and that it did not know that the Soviets were now actively supporting the North as it prepared to invade.If the North planned to invade, Washington planned to make South Korea as juicy a target as possible for its neighbours. Only in this way would the conflict necessary for the realisation of NSC68 be achieved. So Syngman Rhee was faced with complaints from Washington that inflation in his country was rife, and that he would have to sort this out before sufficient military aid would be provided. Where Rhee protested that his state was desperately vulnerable in light of rumours of Northern rearmament, Acheson(pictured here with Truman) stalled, and presented the South Korean regime as too beligerent to be trusted with greater defensive capabilities, a claim which has mostly stuck to this day.In the height of his desperation, the uninformed American ambassador to South Korea, John J Muccio, would attempt to travel to Washington and make his case. As he planned his trip, it was difficult to believe that the Truman administration could indeed be this grossly incompetant and ignorant of the situation. As we'll see, this conventional explanation for why the US ignored the repeated warnings doesn't hold up particularly well under scrutiny. It's time to challenge what you think you know, and I'm here as always to help you do that!*******Music Used:"Gloomy Sunday", by Paul Whiteman, released in 1936. This iconic tune was made use of during the Hungarian revolts. It is indeed a gloomy tune, but also one of immense quality, so I hope you enjoy it! You can find it free here: https://archive.org/details/PaulWhitemanwithJohnnyHauser1956 - The Eventful Year is now LIVE! Head on over to its new home and check out this new, originally researched series, and listen to over two hours of free content now! If you like what you hear, why not join up on Patreon for $5 a month, and get access to the complete story 1956 provides: a rich and immensely detailed saga spanning 35 episodes!? You'll be investing in WDF's future, feasting on all the best exclusive content to come, AND have access to the XTRA feed's extensive back catalogue! Thanksss!For 1956: https://www.acast.com/1956eventfulyearTo access it all, head over to the XTRA feed: https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails/postsWant to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, website, source materials and Patreon below.Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enSupport us financially on Patreon and access an ad-free episodes ($2 per month) and an hour of extra content ($5 per month): acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 37 Minutes 19 Mar 2018

Episode 14: The Race To Ruin examines the Asian theatre in spring 1950, and the different concerns which the North Koreans, Soviet and Chinese leaders grappled with. At the apex of these concerns was the alternative plan of Mao's, as Mao desperately wanted to invade Taiwan, and end the Chinese Civil War once and for all before either American support or some form of republican resurgence on that island threatened China. This fear of the implications for Chinese security in Taiwan compelled Mao to act entirely as Stalin expected.Mao was eager to invade Taiwan, but required Soviet aid to launch such an invasion since he lacked the necessary landing craft. Thus, Stalin held the cards, and he also held them in the Korean case, as supplies began arriving in Pyongyang at the same time as Stalin met with the North Korean delegation over February to April. Important details, and the blueprint of the war were essentially hammered out, and Stalin presented the conflict going the way which Kim had hoped. It would not be a long war, Stalin claimed, but a short sharp one, whereupon the fall of Seoul would cause a pro-Kim uprising in South Korea, and the country would fall without Kim Il-sung having to lift a finger. This, of course, was what Kim Il-sung wanted to hear.If Kim was being duped by Stalin on this issue, then Mao wasn't doing much better. Gradually, at least, the Chinese leader was beginning to suspect that something was underway in North Korea. Because Stalin kept Mao in the dark on point of principle, Mao couldn't be sure of Soviet moves, but he felt a pressure upon his goals to invade Taiwan, and this was enough to force him to accelerate his plans for an invasion, with or without the necessary craft. This increased preparedness, of course, caused Stalin to increase his own Korean War plans. If Mao managed to seize Taiwan before the Korean War was launched, then Chiang Kai-shek would be absent, and the Sino-American relationship could be potentially healed. To prevent this, Stalin attempted to intercept the Chinese by pushing Kim forward in Korea. It was thus a race, yet on any consideration, it was a race to ruin. Stalin was eager to launch the war, but he was far from eager to actually fight it.*********1956 - The Eventful Year is now LIVE! Head on over to its new home and check out this new, originally researched series, and listen to over two hours of free content now! If you like what you hear, why not join up on Patreon for $5 a month, and get access to the complete story 1956 provides: a rich and immensely detailed saga spanning 35 episodes!? You'll be investing in WDF's future, feasting on all the best exclusive content to come, AND have access to the XTRA feed's extensive back catalogue! Thanksss!For 1956: https://www.acast.com/1956eventfulyearTo access it all, head over to the XTRA feed: https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails/postsWant to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, website, source materials and Patreon below.Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enSupport us financially on Patreon and access an ad-free episodes ($2 per month) and an hour of extra content ($5 per month): acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 42 Minutes 16 Mar 2018

In the final part of our conversation with Tomi, we talk through the process of telling his story. How hard was it, why did he feel compelled to speak after so many years of silence, and how does he feel about the current state of affairs in Europe today? These and so many other questions are lobbed in his direction, and Tomi was gracious and open enough to answer them. I shouldn't have to tell you how thankful I am to Tomi for giving us his very valuable time here, but I do recommend that if you want to know more about him, look him up, and of course, email me wdfpodcast@hotmail.com where I'll be happy to pass a message on.So that's it. After such an exciting last few weeks, it is amazing to bring this to you guys. I hope you have enjoyed absorbing the words and stories of this incredible man, and that you, like myself, are feeling pretty grateful right now to Tomi for his immense service. I think I can speak for all of us when I say that I hope Tomi NEVER stops speaking. Too many of us still need to hear you story!***************Tomi Reichental would love to hear from you, so be sure to send me any messages you may have for him and I will happily pass them on to him! For further information about the award winning documentaries Tomi has helped direct and taken an active part in, see the links below.Till The Tenth Generation intro: https://vimeo.com/101014541Close To Evil intro: http://www.rte.ie/archives/2014/0827/639627-close-to-evil/Condemned To Remember intro: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cCWWVwrK4L0A huge thanksss again must go out to Tomi Reichental himself, who gave up his valuable time and invited me into his lovely home to help this interview take place. It is because of his need to tell his story that we are privileged to host it here. Thank you Tomi, you are a true history friend. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 47 Minutes 14 Mar 2018

Tomi's story continues, as he talks us through his arrival in Belsen, a place his family members knew nothing of, and expected would be their final destination. Tragically, as we'll see, this was to be true for some of them. Tomi brings us through his harrowing experiences of life in a concentration camp, just as the Nazi system was falling apart. It contains detail which some may find upsetting, so I have marked it as explicit for this reason.Tomi's story is one which brings us through some difficult themes and scenes, but it ends on a note of hope, as he learns for the first time, after staying silent for so long, how important speaking out truly is. Please make sure to join us for the final part on Friday, as we bring this incredible saga to its end.*******************Tomi Reichental would love to hear from you, so be sure to send me any messages you may have for him and I will happily pass them on to him! For further information about the award winning documentaries Tomi has helped direct and taken an active part in, see the links below.Till The Tenth Generation intro: https://vimeo.com/101014541Close To Evil intro: http://www.rte.ie/archives/2014/0827/639627-close-to-evil/Condemned To Remember intro: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cCWWVwrK4L0A huge thanksss again must go out to Tomi Reichental himself, who gave up his valuable time and invited me into his lovely home to help this interview take place. It is because of his need to tell his story that we are privileged to host it here. Thank you Tomi, you are a true history friend. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 9 Minutes 13 Mar 2018

Today we will be taking a break from the Korean War to introduce you to a new show from the Wondery Podcast Network called “This Is War”, presenting fascinating, dramatic and intensely human stories from the men and women who serve their country in the United Staes military. These are up close and personal accounts of their experiences in combat. How does the reality of what they faced effect these brave soldiers? How do they overcome the physical and psychological scars suffered on and off the battleground. You will hear first hand accounts from veterans who have experienced the highs and lows of serving their country. Comrades in arms and the emotional road they travel returning to their lives back home. In this episode, we meet Ian Mearns. A month before his senior year in high school when he was just seventeen years old, Ian walked into the recruitment office and signed up on the deferred entry program. That was August of 2001. A year later, the world had completely changed and he was entering the military under very different circumstances than he had anticipated. Here is a short preview.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 53 Minutes 12 Mar 2018

SKIP TO 12:00 TO BEGIN HEARING THE INTERVIEW IF YOU WANT TO SKIP MY INTRO!Today history friends we have something incredibly special lined up for you. All this week, we'll be letting loose three parts of an interview I did with Holocaust survivor Tomi Reichental. Obviously, I am incredibly excited to bring this to you, but I am also deeply indebted to Tomi for coming onto the show and telling his story, a story which most of my Irish listeners, and some others, may already know, but which deserves absolutely to be heard, and then heard again.In this first part, we talk about Tomi's childhood, and how he went from being an innocent boy in a quaint Slovakian village, where everyone knew everyone, to being shipped off in a cattle cart, separated from his family at 9 years of age, destined for somewhere unknown. It is a harrowing story, but it is also a fundamentally important story for us to hear. Tomi Reichental was a boy in Bergen-Belsen, and lived in that hell from November 1944 until liberation in mid-April 1945.Everyone should hear what Tomi has to say, so make sure to spread the word that WDF is playing host to a Holocaust survivor. Like many of you guys said when I asked what I should ask Mr Reichental, I simply ask him here to tell us his story, and what a story it is.***********Tomi Reichental would love to hear from you, so be sure to send me any messages you may have for him and I will happily pass them on to him! For further information about the award winning documentaries Tomi has helped direct and taken an active part in, see the links below.Till The Tenth Generation intro: https://vimeo.com/101014541Close To Evil intro: http://www.rte.ie/archives/2014/0827/639627-close-to-evil/Condemned To Remember intro: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cCWWVwrK4L0A huge thanksss again must go out to Tomi Reichental himself, who gave up his valuable time and invited me into his lovely home to help this interview take place. It is because of his need to tell his story that we are privileged to host it here. Thank you Tomi, you are a true history friend. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 40 Minutes 05 Mar 2018

Episode 13: A Useful Bombshell examines the immediate reactions to the Sino-Soviet Alliance in the US. Now that their wedge strategy had been torpedoed, and the Truman administration had failed to save China again, the question remained as to what Dean Acheson could do next. Under pressure from foreign and domestic critics, it was imperative that something was done to reverse these negative trends, and get some kind of a win for American foreign policy.If you've been paying attention so far, you'll know that THIS is the moment in our story when our coverage really diverges away from the mainstream version of what happened, but bear with me, because we certainly aren't being 'alt' for no reason!The version of the KW which I plan to present in this series is this: far from twiddling its thumbs and living in blissful ignorance of the threat to Korea and Taiwan, Acheson and some newly installed, more hardline colleagues determined that Korea could have some real value as a piece of bait. This bait could draw first the North Koreans and then the Chinese in, while Taiwan would be secured, a new frontline against communism would be drawn in Asia, and, most importantly of all, Washington would wrest approval in these desperate times for a manifold explosion in its defence budget, from $15 billion to $70 billion, as we have seen."No people in history have preserved their freedom who thought that by not being strong enough to protect themselves they might prove inoffensive to their enemies." Such was the opinion of NSC68, our boo for this series, and the key to understanding why the US pursued the foreign policy that it did. Having tried and failed to disarm the Soviet capabilities through diplomacy, plan B looked to contain the Sino-Soviet bloc, although it was tacitly acknowledged that to bluff the Soviets from a position of weakness would be a recipe for disaster.NSC68 did not mean war with the Soviets - it meant the creation of a military industrial complex that would enable Washington to contain communism, and peacefully dictate to Moscow from a position of strength. Episode 13's useful bombshell was thus that Sino-Soviet alliance, because without it, the Truman administration could never have turned American fortunes around as they did, and the US may well never have emerged as the supreme military power in the Cold War. This, and some other musings, are our episode 13, so I hope you enjoy it!***************1956 - The Eventful Year is now LIVE! Head on over to its new home and check out this new, originally researched series, and listen to over two hours of free content now! If you like what you hear, why not join up on Patreon for $5 a month, and get access to the complete story 1956 provides: a rich and immensely detailed saga spanning 35 episodes!? You'll be investing in WDF's future, feasting on all the best exclusive content to come, AND have access to the XTRA feed's extensive back catalogue! Thanksss!For 1956: https://www.acast.com/1956eventfulyearTo access it all, head over to the XTRA feed: https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails/postsWant to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, website, source materials and Patreon below.Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 12 Minutes 28 Feb 2018

1956 - The Eventful Year is a new series which you will absolutely LOVE if you love WDF! But what's going on? Where is 1956? What's it all about? Well these are good questions, and in this little episode, I talk briefly about these issues, but I also give you guys a TEASER from Episode 1.3 of 1956, which is fully accessible if you are a Patron at the $5 level or higher! I have some great things planned for WDF in the future, and 2018 is going to be a huge, and very important year for us, so I hope I'll have you on board. If you want to listen to the first four episodes of 1956 YOU CAN, and absolutely free, just head over to its new home at: https://www.acast.com/1956eventfulyear If you want to access all of the content which the XTRA feed and 1956 - The Eventful Year has to offer, then I would recommend signing up and becoming a Diplomat today, and do your bit in the process to help make history THRIVE: https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails. . .

  Direct Link   Download 35 Minutes 26 Feb 2018

**REMEMBER, 1956 - The Eventful Year is out NOW! 1956 is a brand new original series examining the eventful aftermath of the Korean War. Stalin was dead, the West was facing numerous troubles, and everything seemed in flux. It is an incredible story, and I really enjoyed researching it. It is absolutely free to listen to the first few episodes of 1956, but it is in a brand new podcast feed! 4 episodes in total and more to come are on the way, so please do follow these links so that you can subscribe and enjoy this underrated story.The following episodes are available to all:What is 1956?1956 Part 1 Introduction1956 Episode 1.1: Death of a Comrade1956 Episode 1.2: There Can Be Only One!To find on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/ie/podcast/1956-the-eventful-year/id1351213922To find on Acast: https://www.acast.com/1956eventfulyearPlease do stop by - there's so much to see and hear in this series, and already I have heard great things from several listeners and Patrons alike! Thankssss! :D***************In Episode 12, A Treaty of 'Friendship', we examine Mao Zedong's visit to Moscow reaching its conclusion. The long awaited treaty, so long feared in the US, was concluded on 14th February. Yet, while on the surface, the agreement was steeped in mutual cooperation and Sino-Soviet happiness, the truth was far more complex, and far less warm.Under the surface, Stalin had already set the ball rolling for a war in Korea by providing Kim Il-Sung with thousands of new experienced soldiers, freshly returned from their campaigns in China. This sudden influx of experienced and enthusiastic veterans meant that Kim was in a position to invade the South, at least, so he thought. To Mao Zedong, this meant a whole load of bad things, but above all, it meant complications and security problems for his fledgling People's Republic.Having sown this seed in the background, Stalin was bound to see it bear fruit in the near future, and he found that Mao was a great deal more suspicious of him when they met in late January to conclude their long awaited deal. The rumour and whispers about Stalin's moves and the dangers these posed Mao compelled the Chinese leader to change his stance in many, almost hilarious respects. While Stalin, altered also by the events he was setting in motion, had changed his tune as well. The Treaty of Friendship, while lamented in Washington, was as much a blessing as a curse for Mao - above all, it now meant that the race was on to make war against Taiwan before there was war in Korea. The problem being, Stalin had his hands all over the necessary equipment, and he was in total control*****Want to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, website, source materials and Patreon below.Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enSupport us financially on Patreon and access an ad-free episodes ($2 per month) and an hour of extra content ($5 per month): https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsVisit the website: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/Visit the blog: acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 39 Minutes 19 Feb 2018

This is a VERY detailed episode, and can be best divided into three parts.1) Explaining the different NSC reports and papers, and how they were reconciled as new developments affected a change in US foreign policy.2) Stalin's decision to walk out of the UN Security Council, and why he did it!3) Acheson's speech to the National Press Club on 12th January 1950 - so long lambasted as an example of the Secretary of State's carelessness, but in actual fact representing a veiled attempt to appeal to Mao Zedong.As detailed as it is, it's also chock full of fascinating info, so listen in!Episode 11: Coming Full Circle ties together the last six episodes that examined the Sino-Soviet and Sino-American relations in their different boxes. The countless ways in which American, Soviet and Chinese interests overlapped in the world made hammering out satisfactory deals somewhat difficult, but as 1950 dawned, the Chinese were finally closing in on signing the deal with the Soviets, but not if Dean Acheson had anything to say about it!In the course of his last efforts to drive that wedge between China and Russia, Acheson performed the now infamous speech at the National Press Club on 12th January 1950. Ever since that moment, Acheson came to be regarded as the man who led the world to believe that the US did not care about South Korea, and thus he is sometimes criticised for giving the green light to Kim Il-sung, who interpreted his speech as saying that Washington would leave Seoul to its fate. The reality, as we'll discover, was a bit more complicated, FAR more interesting and had, at its goal, the friendship of China.Acheson was not going down without a fight, but within days, everything he held to be true about American foreign policy would change. See how such an incredible story unfolded, in our latest episode of the Korean War!******Music used:"Smoky Mountain Blues" by Wallace Chains, released in 1939. Available:http://www.museumsyndicate.com/item.php?item=82680Want to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, website, source materials and Patreon below.Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsFacebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enVisit the website: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/Visit the blog: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/thevassalstate/Look at our sources: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/Remember spreading the word by telling a history friend about us is still the most effective way to spread the history love! Thanksss :D For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 37 Minutes 14 Feb 2018

Episode 10: Sino-American Talks Part 2 concludes our take on where the Sino-American diplomacy led as 1949 became 1950. It provides a crucial bit of background to how the US reacted to the actual signing of the Sino-Soviet Treaty, so make sure you have a listen in, and as always, be sure to let me know what you all thought!The increasing supremacy of the communists, as well as the difficulties posed by the British, were among the complications that the Truman administration faced when its face, Dean Acheson, (pictured here at work with NATO) attempted to continue with the wedge approach. As we learned last time, Acheson believed that only by accepting the facts of the day and abandoning the doomed Chiang Kai-shek could US interests in Asia and across the world be upheld. Unless America abandoned Chiang, it could never pose as a friend to Mao, and thus Acheson attempted, in a last ditch effort in autumn 1949, to be that friend.Mao was in indeed looking for a friend, but as we have learned, Acheson's efforts came as too little too late. Worse, the Soviets managed to detonate their own atom bomb in August, reducing the American supremacy in world affairs. Pressure was mounting on Acheson to wrest something from Mao, just as it was mounting on Mao to reach an agreement with Stalin. As we know, only one of these outcomes could come to pass, and Beijing would side with their ideological allies rather than the suspicious Washington.Acheson didn't know it yet, but his failure here would lead him to trumpet an even more radical policy than appeasing the Chinese. If the Soviets and Chinese wanted to be in cahoots, then America would allow it and confront the problem head on, but first she needed to re-arm. The march towards Korea was beginning.*******Music used:"Goodnight Angeline", by the Four Harmony Kings, in 1921. This gem can be found by going to: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/The_Four_Harmony_Kings/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_02032015/Goodnight_Angeline_-_The_Four_Harmony_KingsWant to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, website, source materials and Patreon below.Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enSupport us financially on Patreon and access an ad-free episodes ($2 per month) and an hour of extra content ($5 per month): https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsVisit the website: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/Visit the blog: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/thevassalstate/Look at our sources: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/Remember spreading the word by telling a history friend about us is still the most effective way to spread the history love! Thanksss :D For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 33 Minutes 12 Feb 2018

Episode 9: Sino-American Talks Part 1 introduces us to the OTHER side of Chinese diplomacy between 1949-50; that involving the US, and how Washington attempted to wrest some benefit out of the rapidly changing situation in China, as the Republican/Nationalists led by Chiang Kai-shek suffered successive defeats at Mao's hands.The US would attempt to drive a wedge between the USSR and the PRC during 1949 - a policy which we know, in light of the signing of the Sino-Soviet alliance, eventually failed, but this was not from lack of trying! To set the proper for context for the radical change in American foreign policy which emerged in spring 1950, it is necessary here to detail what came before. I hope you guys enjoy our examination of a period of post-war American diplomacy which is largely skimmed over today.At the head of this wedge strategy was the Secretary of State Dean Acheson (pictured), who rebelled against the policy insisted upon by the right of centre Republicans that wanted the US to fight for Chiang Kai-shek. Acheson was adamant that only through the appeasement of the communist Chinese, through a realistic approach to their civil war, and through an appraisal of the advantages the US had over the Chinese, could the feared Sino-Soviet agreement be prevented. Time would show, as we know, that Acheson, as well as his peers, were wrong on all accounts.This episode, much like the previous take on Sino-Soviet relations, forms a critically important building block, and is a necessary scene setting step towards the REALLY juicy stuff in early 1950, so I hope you enjoy it!******Music used:"Casey Jones", by Mr and Mrs Byron Coffin, released in 1939. Available:http://www.loc.gov/…/pres…/activities/songs/audio/song1a.mp3Want to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, website, source materials and Patreon below.Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enSupport us financially on Patreon and access an ad-free episodes ($2 per month) and an hour of extra content ($5 per month): https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsVisit the website: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/Visit the blog: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/thevassalstate/Look at our sources: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/Remember spreading the word by telling a history friend about us is still the most effective way to spread the history love! Thanksss :D For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 31 Minutes 08 Feb 2018

Yay! We've finally had a Q & A, where you guys sent me a variety of lovely questions and I did my best to answer! Within are such questions as:What part of the KW do you find most fascinating?What have been your top 3 topics you have covered in order from 1-3?How do you decide what to cover? Is there any historical topic you just will not touch, under any circumstances?What would you consider a good day’s work in terms of your production schedule?What got you first interested in history?If you could have a Guinness with any historical figure and ask them any question, who would you choose and what would you ask? Will you ever meet your fans in the US?AND SO MUCH MORE!A huge thanksss to all of you that sent me questions over the last few weeks - and remember that we're reading out our new Patrons at the end, so stick around for your well-deserved fame!************Want to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, website, source materials and Patreon!Patreon: www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsFacebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enVisit the website: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/Visit the blog: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/thevassalstate/Look at our sources: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/Remember spreading the word by telling a history friend about us is still the most effective way to spread the history love! Thanksss :D For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 35 Minutes 07 Feb 2018

Episode 8: Sino-Soviet Talks Part 4 is the final episode examining the scene in Moscow, where the defining alliance between the Chinese Communists and the Soviet Union was signed. It took a great deal of compromise...or wait, no it didn't. It required a lot of trust...no wait, that's not right either. Em, it was mutually beneficial to both sides thanks to a whole load of scheming and power plays? Yes that's a bit more accurate. The Sino-Soviet alliance wasn't your typical alliance - it was forged by two paranoid entities at a time when each party seriously mistrusted the other.Within this episode, we are confronted by Stalin's changing policy towards Korea, as his own policy aims seemed in jeopardy if the Chinese managed to forge a deal with the West. At the core of Stalin's concerns was that his own influence would be diluted even if the Chinese managed to forge an alliance with Moscow, as American aid or agreements could replace those of the Soviet variety. To intercept this challenge to his supremacy, Stalin began to set in motion plans which would lead directly to the outbreak of war on the Korean peninsula six months later. This episode is thus a critically important one if we are to understand Stalin's mindset and his overall policy aims. Here we discover exactly how responsible Stalin was for the conflict that followed, so I hope you enjoy it!******Music used:"Too-Ra-Loo-Ra-Loo-Ral", by Chauncey Olcott, an Irish tune originating in 1913, but popularised by Bing Crosby in the 1940s. You can find it here:http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Chauncey_Olcott/Want to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, website, source materials and Patreon below.Join us on Patreon for $2 a month to access ad-free episodes earlier than normal listeners, or for $5 to access an hour of extra content every month! https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsFacebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enVisit the website: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/Visit the blog: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/thevassalstate/Look at our sources: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/Remember spreading the word by telling a history friend about us is still the most effective way to spread the history love! Thanksss :D For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 36 Minutes 05 Feb 2018

Episode 7: Sino-Soviet Talks Part 3 picks up in this developing story, as the Chinese and Soviets cautiously move ever closer to one another in world affairs. Stalin's mission was clear. He welcomed Mao Zedong to Moscow in December 1949, in the midst of rumours that the Sino-Soviet bloc were keen to furnish some kind of alliance. Stalin, much like Mao, wanted to have his cake and eat it too, and would put up several obstacles to the successful conclusion of an alliance treaty, blaming Yalt, the West, the Americans and bad weather instead of his own personal intransigence.Mao would have to persevere if he wanted the alliance that he had travelled to Moscow to acquire. Much still needed to be done though, and in this penultimate episode analysing these talks, we see the thorny issues like Manchuria, the Soviet occupation of naval bases and the provision of resources to the Chinese in the context of the early Cold War. I hope you'll join me then, as we continue to countdown towards the cementing of one of the most important alliances signed in the 20th century.****Music used:"My Creole Sue", a 1909 track by the Columbia Quartet, available:http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Columbia_Quartette/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_02032015/My_Creole_Sue_-_Columbia_QuartetteWant to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, website, source materials and Patreon below.Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enSupport us financially on Patreon and access an ad-free episodes ($2 per month) and an hour of extra content ($5 per month): https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsVisit the website: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/Visit the blog: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/thevassalstate/Look at our sources: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/Remember spreading the word by telling a history friend about us is still the most effective way to spread the history love! Thanksss :D For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 33 Minutes 31 Jan 2018

IMP: Liu Shaoqi is Liu 'Shao-Chi' - NOT Liu 'Shao-Kwee'. Apologies for the mispronunciation! Love me anyway? Episode 6: Sino-Soviet Talks Part 2, continues the story from where we left off last time. The Chinese communists launch their final great offensive of the civil war against the Nationalists from April 1949, as Stalin watches his old strategy crumble. Faced with the emergence of a dominant Chinese Communist Party, rather than the divided Chinese state that he desired, how would Stalin respond?In the event, he welcomed Mao's ally Liu Shaoqi to Moscow in summer 1949 to talk through some important issues, and pave the way for a deeper friendship between the two communist regimes. Even at this stage, with both parties harbouring great and conflicting ambitions, success or alliance were by no means certain outcomes. Much, it seemed, still needed to be done.*******Music used:'Cotton Eye Joe' by Elmo Newcomer, a 1948 song which can be found here:https://www.loc.gov/item/lomaxbib000040/Want to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, website, source materials and Patreon below.Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enSupport us financially on Patreon and access an ad-free episodes ($2 per month) and an hour of extra content ($5 per month): https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsVisit the website: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/Visit the blog: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/thevassalstate/Look at our sources: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/Remember spreading the word by telling a history friend about us is still the most effective way to spread the history love! Thanksss :D For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 36 Minutes 29 Jan 2018

Episode 5: Sino-Soviet Talks Part 1 examines, as you may have guessed, the detailed and complex Sino-Soviet relationship, as we build towards the signing of the Sino-Soviet alliance in February 1950. Much like Stalin and Mao had much to do before that alliance was signed, so we have much to cover before we can get to that point in our narrative, and this episode here provides a good deal of background to the Sino-Soviet relationship in the late 1940s.*****Music used:I used the song 'Maria' by Clarice Vance, which was released in 1905 originally but which enjoyed a great deal of popularity throughout the 1960s. You can find this gem here: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Clarice_Vance/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_04212015/Maria_-_Clarice_VanceWant to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, website, source materials and Patreon below.Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enSupport us financially on Patreon and access an ad-free episodes ($2 per month) and an hour of extra content ($5 per month): https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsVisit the website: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/Visit the blog: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/thevassalstate/Look at our sources: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/Remember spreading the word by telling a history friend about us is still the most effective way to spread the history love! Thanksss :D For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 30 Minutes 24 Jan 2018

Episode 4: The Cat's Mao looks at Mao Zedong, the man, the myth, the legend, the disgusting, horrible war criminal and mass murderer who...ahem. Sorry about that. Mao Zedong remains a controversial figure to this day. Some believe China would never have recovered in the manner that it did, and that China would never be the power that it is today, without Mao Zedong at the helm. At the same time, while some are content to name fast food restaurants after him, others decry his responsibility, both directly and indirectly, for the loss of millions of lives - figures too difficult to pin down, but certainly high enough to qualify him in the rank of mass murderers alongside Stalin and Hitler.Indeed, controversy followed Mao, but in this episode we do our best to dispense with what Mao would DO, and focus instead on what the leader of the Chinese Communist Party actually DID. To find out, we look at his birth, his growth, his involvement in the civil wars, in the wars against the Japanese and then in the last phase of the civil war in the late 1940s, whereupon he would be pushed into a position of power arguably never attained by a Chinese figure since the all-powerful Emperors of yore. As was customary though, Mao's power disguised the bare facts of his country's vulnerability and devastation, themes which we will grapple with over the coming episodes.*****Music used:Chinese National Anthem: http://www.freeinfosociety.com/media.php?id=4045Want to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, website, source materials and Patreon below.Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enSupport us financially on Patreon and access an ad-free episodes ($2 per month) and an hour of extra content ($5 per month): https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsVisit the website: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/Visit the blog: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/thevassalstate/Look at our sources: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/Remember spreading the word by telling a history friend about us is still the most effective way to spread the history love! Thanksss :D For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 46 Minutes 22 Jan 2018

Episode 3: The Brittle Curtain, examines the actual situation Comrade Stalin faced when he considered his options in the post-war world. Exactly how strong, or powerful, was the Soviet Union, and how stable were its East European satellites? Was the USSR's control based on more than merely the threat of force, or was the power of fear the glue that tied the entire edifice together?All of these are important questions, and it is immensely important that we get to the bottom of exactly what the position and perspectives of Stalin were in the pre-Korean War world, and we do our best to answer them in this critical bit of background, so I hope you enjoy it my lovely history friends!****Music used:What else could be appropriate for such an episode other than utter forced epicness of the Soviet National Anthem? NOTHING! Here's where we got it, and thanks again to the great work done by sites like Archive.org for making this available to humble podders like me. Available: https://archive.org/details/01NationalAnthemOfTheUSSRWant to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, website, source materials and Patreon below.Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enSupport us financially on Patreon and access an ad-free episodes ($2 per month) and an hour of extra content ($5 per month): https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsVisit the website: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/Visit the blog: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/thevassalstate/Look at our sources: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/Remember spreading the word by telling a history friend about us is still the most effective way to spread the history love! Thanksss :D For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 40 Minutes 17 Jan 2018

In Episode 2: The Force of Peace, we examine the founding moments of the United Nations, where the idea for it came from, why it was established and how it developed as an institution in the 1940s to have a leading role in the post-war world. The UN, as we'll see, was quite effective when its aims didn't conflict with the American or Soviet world views. Limited cooperation was, it seemed, a possibility in this shattered, traumatised world. Yet, this cooperation would only go so far.Clouds were looming on the horizon, but these clouds were largely invisible to General Douglas MacArthur (pictured with Hirohito in an immensely controversial photograph for the time) the other interest of this episode. We look at MacArthur's days in post-war Japan, and how he managed to craft for himself an incredible legacy, with not a small amount of Japanese adoration to boot. MacArthur was busy creating not merely a post-war Japanese order, but also his own legend.His success in this measure would lead in time to his appointment as Supreme Allied Commander in the critical early phases of the Korean War, at a time when his hubris could barely fit within the Japanese islands.It was a recipe for disaster, or was it? Let's investigate, in this second episode of the Korean War!Music used:Ada Jones & Billy Watkins, 'By the Beautiful Sea', available at:http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Ada_Jones_and_Billy_Watkins/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_03312015/By_the_Beautiful_Sea_-_Ada_Jones_and_Billy_Watkins************Want to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, website, source materials and Patreon below.Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enSupport us financially on Patreon and access an ad-free episodes ($2 per month) and an hour of extra content ($5 per month): https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsVisit the website: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/Visit the blog: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/thevassalstate/Look at our sources: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/Remember spreading the word by telling a history friend about us is still the most effective way to spread the history love! Thanksss :D For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 39 Minutes 15 Jan 2018

Episode 1: America Dawns, looks at the situation which greeted US policymakers between 1945-50. As an episode it serves as a good roundup of all we've learned in the Cold War Crash Course, but a simple summary episode THIS IS NOT!We delve into the mindset behind the Truman Doctrine, ask what the goals of NATO were and investigate how Washington viewed Soviet moves by examining their additional policies and proclamations.We also look at the problems which faced the US in the late 1940s, including the mindset which insisted that there was no money in the kitty to fight the Soviets, and that Washington would have to cut its cloth to suit its pocket. This attitude towards defence expenditure and confrontation with the forces of communism would change in time, but not yet. The three losses - of China, of its status as the sole nuclear power, and of Mao Zedong himself to the Soviet Union, after the Treaty of Friendship was signed in February 1950 - all influenced American policymakers to consider a radical change in policy, and they settled upon a blandly named report called NSC68.What was meant by Chinese Titoism? And what had American policymakers hoped to achieve by cosying up to the Chinese communists? Could they really expect to change the perspective of the Chinese, when the Soviets loomed so large in Mao's estimation? Make sure you join us to find out the answer to this question as well as a host of others. Our first episode, at long last. I hope you enjoy it.Remember history friends, you too can support the podcast and join our lovely community in the process!Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207/Twitter: https://twitter.com/wdfpodcastPatreon: www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsWebsite: www.wdfpodcast.comBibliography: www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/ For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 35 Minutes 12 Jan 2018

In the final episode of this miniseries, we look at the several crises which accompanied the answering of the German question. The Berlin Blockade, as well as the Prague Coup, provided key pieces of evidence in the Western mind that Stalinism was expanding its reach through the use of intimidation and brute force. Stalin, it was clear, was determined to pose as the champion of his own brand of Soviet, expansionist communism, powered by the Red Army and the threat of force. It was vital in these circumstances that the West provided a foil to such a challenge, but the question remained one of how to do so in a shattered Europe and a de-mobilising American armed force. To the surprise of all, the solution would be provided not in Europe, but thousands of miles away in Korea.Formidable though he seemed, Stalin had his own problems with Yugoslavia. Tito, it emerged, had developed his own cult of personality, and was far less willing to fall in line that his other Eastern neighbours. This, coupled with the creation of NATO in spring 1949, provided Stalin with a great strategic challenge. Europe was evidently not his for the taking, and the soft power of communism was evidently waning with the hardening of the communist party's attitudes towards their peers in the likes of Italy and France. Had Stalin missed the boat, or was he merely scheming to launch an attack somewhere else? Either way, it was clear that Stalin was the face of Soviet power, and that this Georgian native, this paranoid, cunning, ruthless man was the face of all of democracy's problems.Stalin responded to these challenges as only he knew how - with purges, a second reign of terror and show trials on a vast scale, as Eastern Europe's native communist parties were put through the ringer, and Stalin's worst qualities again bubbled to the surface. In our final installment of the Crash Course, these qualities inflict their damage on Stalin's position and reputation, but it was nothing the Kremlin leader could not handle. In the background, Stalin was already turning his attentions further East. He was in regular contact not merely with the Communist leader of China, but also with the most obscure Stalinist vassal in Korea, a man known as Kim Il-sung. Though nobody could know it yet, within the year, it would be Korea, not Europe, that attentions would be focused, with consequences that are felt to this day.***************Remember history friends, you too can support the podcast and join our lovely community in the process!Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207/Twitter: https://twitter.com/wdfpodcastPatreon: www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsWebsite: www.wdfpodcast.comBibliography: www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/ For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 30 Minutes 11 Jan 2018

The question of Germany and how the east-west divide played a role in answering that question forms the basis of the latest episode in the series. The repairing and restructuring of Germany, so that it was strong enough to contribute to Europe's rebuilding, but not so strong that it pulled another war of revenge out of its hat, was a critical balancing act. It profoundly unnerved some people and inspired others. It puzzled some and excited others. Above all though, it was the legacy of Hitler's war, of Nazism, that was struggled witCould Hitler be purged from the consciousness of these Germans, and how many 'Good Germans' were left that could be expected to lead a democratic Germany into the future? Everyone, from the " first-class comrades" to those that had once resisted Nazism, would have roles in this post-war German order. As the clock ticked by, it remained to be seen what form the new Germany would take, and what role if any the Soviets would be able to have. History as we know, would provide the two halves of German life - the Western democratic, and Eastern communist. This episode is about that journey, its arrival and the problems, challenges and victories therein.To the east, opportunities for Soviet expansion in Prague profoundly influenced the way that the Western allies looked at the world and Germany's role in it. More threatening than a resurgent Germany, perhaps, was an all-powerful, expansionist Soviet Union. It proved to be the case, thanks mostly to Stalin's own blundering and strong arm approach, that the lesser of two evils was a Western German state, rather than a co-opted and empowered Soviet Union. Stalin, not Hitler's ghost, was the true enemy.*************Remember history friends, you too can support the podcast and join our lovely community in the process!Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207/Twitter: https://twitter.com/wdfpodcastPatreon: www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsWebsite: www.wdfpodcast.comBibliography: www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/ For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 31 Minutes 10 Jan 2018

In our latest installment of the series, we look at the person of Josef Stalin, a dominant figure for our wider Korean War series, and his security blanket he was in the process of creating in Eastern Europe. The spread of communism in Europe's shattered cities, combined with the looming threat of the Red Army and the sweeping impact of its soldiers into the East, created a new dynamic in Europe. At the head of this new dynamic was the will and ambition of Stalin, who had a direct hand in everything that occurred.Stalin was critical in his creation of the Soviet Union bloc, but he was also critically important to any arrangement which would be reached on the future of Germany. Exactly what form Germany would take, whether it was feasible or sustainable to preserve Germany in its divided state - these were questions that the post-war governments in Britain, the US and France all grappled with. Without Stalin, they initially believed, any progress on this question would be impossible.With Churchill's Iron Curtain speech, and Stalin's pronouncement of the West's hostility to the needs of Eastern Europe's citizens, the Cold War lines were clearly being drawn. Several conflicts lay ahead, but the more immediate questions, such as how to rebuild the continent and what to do about the continent's integral centrepiece - the Germans - remained a sore point for some and pressingly urgent for others. Here we find out how the post-war allies of east and west attempted to cooperate in spite of the looming divisions into the different ideological camps.The German question, as we'll see, could not be answered in a year, (or one episode!) it was instead a question based fundamentally on Berlin's past behaviour, where German revanchism and a repeat of the post-WW1 experience remained at the forefront of many minds.***************Remember history friends, you too can support the podcast and join our lovely community in the process!Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207/Twitter: https://twitter.com/wdfpodcastPatreon: www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsWebsite: www.wdfpodcast.comBibliography: www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/ For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 34 Minutes 09 Jan 2018

In the second episode of the CWCC, we look at how the US managed to tie Western Europe closer to its orbit through political strategy, closer cooperation and sheer economic investment. The Truman Doctrine, Marshall Plan and NATO were critical building blocks in the Euro-American relationship in the late 1940s, and we get to grips with them here.As the US worked with its beleaguered allies, the chronic lack of food as much as coal threatened disaster. With the dollar above all being the top currency of the shattered continent, a shortage of these same dollars represented disaster to many European states. The initial solution, so it seemed, was favourable loans. Eventually, the solution, stark as it was, was the provision of American sponsored grants. The provision of billions of dollars of aid to get the West back on track, so that it could stand up to communism and hold its own.All the while, Moscow schemed, and the critical question of what to do with Germany loomed large. Neither question would be answered quickly, or without the expenditure of a great deal of effort, money and other resources. Although they were on the right track, there was much to be concerned about in this post-war world, and several challenges still lay on the horizon. The dangers of a communist takeover, or of the big freeze that the winter of 1947-48 presented, threatened ruin for Western civilisation, and one man in particular George C Marshall (pictured), believed that strategic charity, not a tough business sense, should take centre stage. Marshall Aid was en route, but would it get there in time?Remember history friends, you too can support the podcast and join our lovely community in the process!Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207/Twitter: https://twitter.com/wdfpodcastPatreon: www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsWebsite: www.wdfpodcast.comBibliography: www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/ For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 27 Minutes 08 Jan 2018

"I thought you’d be there waiting for me…what greeted me instead was the lingering stench of ashes and the empty sockets of our ruined home."Polish citizen Samuel Puterman returns to Warsaw in late 1945.We begin our examination of the post-WW2 world by looking at the sheer impact the conflict had on the peoples, infrastructure and industry of Europe. Once considered the centre of the world, now Europe was its shattered, gloomy shell. It would take an immense amount of rebuilding, of money and of effort to bring Europe back to the level even approaching the pre-war state of affairs.Yet in the background, a sinister presence loomed. While the war against Fascism had been won, a new ideological world view - communism - had rooted itself in every broken dream and lost cause that remained left over from the war. Time would tell how this world view would represent itself, but already in the East, signs were emerging that the triumphant Soviet Union planned to create its own system at the expense of those in its path.History friends! The Cold War Crash Course is our prequel to the Korean War, so make sure you check in with us here if you want to be up to speed with what happened before.Remember history friends, you too can support the podcast and join our lovely community in the process!Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207/Twitter: https://twitter.com/wdfpodcastPatreon: www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsWebsite: www.wdfpodcast.comBibliography: www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/ For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 33 Minutes 07 Jan 2018

Is it the forgotten war, or simply a war we need to look at differently? Let's investigate.We need to make some things clear. We have to set out the structure and scope of this project, outline what sources we used and of course, talk a bit about how each one of the episodes will be structured. What music will we used? What will Patrons get? What will the series actually look like? This is the place to find out - the Sources and Structure of the series will be learned of here.You don't NEED to check this episode out, but if you like to be filled in on a variety of details, do check this episode out. Remember of course that I am excited to hear what you think about this - I am super excited to talk and nerd out with you about this conflict. As ever you can find history nerds and some other normal people in the Facebook group linked below. A huge thankssss to all of you that have supported us thus far, and after such a long time, I can't wait to finally unleash this massive series on you guys!Remember history friends, you too can support the podcast and join our lovely community in the process!Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207/Twitter: https://twitter.com/wdfpodcastPatreon: www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsWebsite: www.wdfpodcast.comBibliography: www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/ For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 43 Minutes 07 Jan 2018

The Korean War is a project which I have been preparing for for several months. It is in this episode that I drop some knowledge on you guys, such as, above all, what my take on the Korean War will look like, and what exactly I have here that is so potentially controversial. My revisionist take on the conflict is a brave approach considering the conventional views, but I do hope you'll give it a chance. Either way there are some fascinating stories to get through, and we have so much to get through in terms of introducing this series, that we need TWO Introduction episodes to get us all up to speed!This is diplomatic history at its most juicy, and at its most underrated and glossed over. I hope to change all that, by bringing you all the most detailed account of the diplomatic origins of the war, in a 48 episode epic unparalleled in history podcast land. Why in the 21st century does a regime like Kim Jong-un's exist? All of it can be traced back to the events of the Korean War, and thanks to the legacy of the war, it has never been so relevant. We need to be able to properly understand and appreciate it if we are to then understand why North Korea does what it does today. Here we unwrap my plans, but be sure to check out the second introduction episode if you'd like more information on the sources and structure used for this series.Other than that history friends, I'm so excited to finally bring this to you, so I have to say thanksss and I hope to see you all there!Remember history friends, you too can support the podcast and join our lovely community in the process!Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207/Twitter: https://twitter.com/wdfpodcastPatreon: www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsWebsite: www.wdfpodcast.comBibliography: www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/ For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 14 Minutes 05 Jan 2018

The Korean War was fought from 1950-1953, and while many of us today have a rough idea of how it went, to most it is those two lines in a textbook, an irrelevant blip on the Cold War radar. An unimportant, unappreciated event in the crowded literature of the 20th century. To me, the Korean War is many things, and over the last few months I have been working tirelessly to create the most comprehensive, authentic and accurate account of the diplomatic and political origins of this conflict. Not only that, but I will also be dropping some controversial conclusions and hypothoses on you guys, as we follow the trend of projects like the July Crisis and 1916 by giving you a fresh, revisionist take. Not merely for the sake of it, of course, but because I have come to be persuaded to see this war in a certain light, and I have come to understand its cause and effect formula in a different way to most conventional narratives. If you will let me then, I hope you take you on something of a journey. Make sure to look out for the other two introduction episodes, yes TWO, but for now, try to place yourself in the era of the post-war world, as we go somewhere WDF has never gone before. I hope you enjoy it, and that you are excited to finally explore the Korean War. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 20 Minutes 03 Jan 2018

What is American History Tellers? Well it's an exciting new show from Wondery that dives deep into American history covering events, news, headlines, and yes - sometimes presidents. America is a nation steeped in tradition, and the words we speak, ideas we share, values we admire and the freedoms we defend can all be traced to our shared history.The podcast will take you to the events, times, and people that shaped America and the Americans, through a sound design and scripts written by PhD historians. They’ll put you in the shoes of everyday citizens living through the Cold War, for example, or the Revolution, Prohibition, the Space Race, or the Gold Rush. And they show you how our history affected them, their families… and affects you.If you enjoyed this clip here, remember to subscribe and search for the show through the usual channels, and of course by checking out the show's website here: https://wondery.com/wondery/shows/americanhistorytellers/ and here! https://art19.com/shows/american-history-tellers. . .

  Direct Link   Download 34 Minutes 01 Jan 2018

Here we are as promised, opening up the new year with a detailed look at where WDF is going next, why it's going there and why you should care! We address the following issues within:- massive thanksss given all round for a fantastic year.- we read out the Patrons at the end- we talk about having to launch an archive feed!- we talk about whether or not we should launch a Facebook group- we unwrap the upcoming series; the Korean War, the Patrons' exclusive 1956, the Versailles Anniversary Project, Poland Is Not Yet Lost and much more!A huge thanksss to everyone who made WDF's year so special! I can't tell you how much I appreciate you all!Support us on Patreon: patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsFollow on Twitter: @wdfpodcastLike on Facebook under the same name, and find our website wdfpodcast.com where you can visit the blog - the Vassal State!Be sure to check out this podcast by our Patron Shawn Warwick - the American History Podcast! http://theamericanhistorypodcast.com/ For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 28 Minutes 22 Dec 2017

Dear and valued listeners, we return instantly with the second part of my Christmas present to you! Was Louis' fp a success or not, let's find out!Here we examine Louis' reign from the early 1680s, and consider the damage he inflicted on European public opinion, juxtaposed with the material and military gains accrued to France because of Louis' largely victorious wars. I hope you enjoy this concluding episode of our two-parter history friends and patrons.Thanksss for listening, happy Christmas and make sure YOU join WDF in the new year for some incredible new stories and approaches to history. If you want to throw some monies our way AND help make history thrive then you can! Simply visit www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails and receive some :D For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 25 Minutes 22 Dec 2017

As a special Christmas present to all my lovely listeners, after you have given me such a fantastic year, here is the first of a two parter which I released to Patrons at the $5 level earlier this year, now freeto listen for YOU! Make sure you let me know if you enjoyed this episode, as we close out the eventful year of 2017 with a BANG! Thankssss!Herein we ask the question - was Louis XIV's foreign policy a success? We know he experienced military success and tore Europe asunder; we know he was a formidable character and an implacable ruler, but do his successes and strengths outweigh the damage and cost which was wrought on France? Here we take this question up to the point of the early 1680s, while the next episode will conclude the question and answer it, hopefully to your conclusion. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 36 Minutes 22 Dec 2017

It's here! The conclusion to our 16 part story which we've been building towards for several weeks, months and years. Since we began the tale of the Thirty Years War, our narrative has, in several ways, been moving towards this incredible culmination of east meeting west. On 12th September 1683, the forces of the Ottoman Empire under Kara Mustafa met and did battle with the relief army comprised of several troops from countries as diverse as Poland, Saxony, Austria, France, Bavaria, Spain and more! The pressing question wasn't just 'Would we make it in time?'To the relief army, led by Charles of Lorraine, King Jan Sobieski of Poland and General Waldeck, the question remained as to whether they could in fact defeat the most formidable force ever mobilised by the Turks, or would they succumb, just like so many others, to the Grand Vizier's might. It was a tale of revenge, of heroism, of resistance and defiance - a battle of epic proportions, and a conclusion which, while likely to be of no surprise to you guys, sets us up well for our coverage to come.Of course, you may also know, we're taking a break from this era for a while, as we delve into pastures new for the next year or so. Our next spotlight will fall on the Korean War from January, but for now, it suffices to leave our epic narrative outside the walls of Vienna, where the forces of history met together on one incredible day in 1683. A huge thanksss to all of you guys for your interest and feedback in making this all possible, and make sure YOU don't forget to check out the simultaneous story of Jan Sobieski's life and times. What brought the King of the Poles to the field on that day, and what stories did he have under his belt by the time he arrived to support the allied charge? Make sure you don't miss out!Other than that, a huge thanksss, and make sure you tune in for our State of the Podcast Address on 1st January 2018, so that you know what's next for WDF!Remember also history friends, that YOU can support us on Patreon and help make history thrive as you do so! Want to start your new year off with a bang? From as little as $2 a month YOU can access additional content and get the good stuff FIRST! See www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails today and see if we can help you help us! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 49 Minutes 18 Dec 2017

They're Here!After several months of waiting and buildup, we finally reach that incredible tale - when for two grisly months, the defenders of Vienna worked miracles to protect their city from the relentless Turk, and when Count Stahremberg used every fibre of his being to keep his men in high enough spirits to continue onwards in their bloody business. Incredible tension, great drama and a story almost too fantastic to be true are contained in this episode, so I hope you enjoy it! Even though it's a long one, it's packed full of juiciness, and I feel gives us a fitting conclusion as our penultimate episode.Finally, they're here.Remember history friends, YOU can help make WDF and history thrive! Head on over to www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails now and for those of us following BEFIT to the letter, be sure to find us on Facebook and follow on Twitter @wdfpodcast THANKSSSS! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 32 Minutes 11 Dec 2017

They're here! After so many weeks of marching, Kara Mustafa's terrifying host reaches the walls of Vienna, but after a few critical days' worth of preparations, Vienna's remaining populace were as prepared as they would ever be for what was to come. Grimly reconciled to the arrival of their greatest foe, only great acts of bravery, tenacity and ingenuity would hold back the Grand Vizier's determined assault. As we can see in this handy homemade diagram of the Vienna defences, such defences were as rudimentary as they were to be effective. Mercifully though, Vienna was not alone.Several hundreds of miles away, the allies of the Holy Roman Emperor marched in the name of rescuing Vienna from this grave threat. From Bavaria, Saxony, Poland, Lithuania and elsewhere they marched, but the real question still lingered in the air - would they get there on time? This episode is episode 14 out of 16 my lovely patrons, so we are in fact nearly at the end of this incredible story, but under no circumstances should you expect it to go out with anything other than a bang!Remember history friends, YOU can help make history THRIVE by heading over to www.patreon.com/WhenDIplomacyFails and by engaging in some healthy dosages of BEFIT today! Thanksss :D For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 41 Minutes 06 Dec 2017

Something special for all lovely fans of WDF for the month of December, it's...something completely unrelated to Christmas!In this episode of WDF THINKS we ask the very relevant question - was Queen Elizabeth I of England all that great at diplomacy? Sure there was that whole Armada thing, but what about her actual talents and abilities as a diplomatist, particularly a female diplomatist in a world where few such things existed? Well, WDF is proud to take up the challenge by examining a lesser known event from Elizabeth's history - the curious issue of the Portuguese Pretender, a certain Don Antonio, the illegitimate son of the extinct Portuguese House, where King Philip II of Spain now claimed overlordship.Liz's mission was to make use of Don Antonio throughout the frightful events of the 1580s, and to somehow help him without offending the Spanish, only to greatly offend and threaten the Spanish when it suited her. Much depended on whether or not Elizabeth needed a Portuguese bargaining chip, or a stick, with which it could beat up the Spanish King. Her record in balancing the right policy was impressive, but was it good enough to justify her place as a named Patreon tier, where only the greatest diplomatists in history reside in that pantheon of thankssss? You simply must find out, and you also must let me know what you thought!Also, make sure that you check the blog post on this very episode - why not put some faces to the names?www.wdfpodcast.com/thevassalstate/wdfthinkslizThis episode was launched to assess the career of Queen Liz, but we also have another reason for doing it. Queen Elizabeth I of England has her own named Patreon tier, and for a certain amount every month, you can select her or her similarly named peers by heading over to www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails If WDF THINKS is something you enjoyed, why not share the love and making me even more excited to pod well into the future. Thanksss to the support I've received from history friends JUST LIKE YOU, I've been able to make this into a part time job, but we can always go further! Let's bring history podcasting to new heights - let's make WDF and history thrive! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 32 Minutes 04 Dec 2017

First things first - DON'T MIND ME! Whatever I call it, it's the River Raab not the River 'Raba'. I think the phlegm has moved into my brain!In our latest episode examines the moment when Kara Mustafa finally did it. Overcoming the expectations and assumptions of the high command of the Habsburgs in their Vienna seclusion, the Ottomans outmanoeuvred Charles of Lorraine completely, heading due north-west, crossing the River Raab, bypassing Gyor and utterly flummoxing the Habsburg family. As Leopold and his entourage fled the city on 7th July 1683, a Turkish storm was coming.Thanks to procrastination, misinformation, internal division, arrogance and ignorance, the greatest threat to the Holy Roman Empire was marching virtually unopposed towards the Golden Apple. Only time would tell if Kara Mustafa’s attempt to take the city would be as terrifyingly unstoppable as his march across the Hungarian plains had been, but the odds certainly did not look to be in the favour of Vienna’s residents, who now took up shovels for the long, arduous test ahead. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 35 Minutes 27 Nov 2017

Our story continues, as in episode 12 of the Long War, the Habsburgs scramble their forces together in the midst of increasingly worrying news across all fronts. Ernst Stahremberg (pictured) makes an appearance, and sets to work building up the defences of Vienna for whatever may transpire. Meanwhile, Charles of Lorraine is celebrated as the man in charge of Habsburg forces, but this ragtag bunch of Europeans will have to shape up before they face up to the terrible might of the Turks.All the while, Kara Mustafa seems to move faster than anyone ever expected, his focus set on...where? Only ever so gradually would the Habsburgs in their Hofburg palace find out.(Above) Layered defences outside of Vienna. (Below) the mind map of square marshy plains which makes up the land to the east of Vienna.************************The story is heating up, and remember where to go if you want EVEN MORE stuff relating to the Last Siege of Vienna - PATREON of course! Jan Sobieski Biography will take you there in a different vehicle, and I've been hearing great things about it, so why not check it out for yourself? Thankssss!www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails Facebook Twitter For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 34 Minutes 20 Nov 2017

We're not QUITE ready to watch the Turk batter down the walls of Vienna - instead, we're spending a few more minutes examining the motives of the Ottoman's two leading men. Is it really possible to properly grasp what led these two figures, Kara Mustafa and Sultan Mehmed IV, in their charge for the Golden Apple?Furthermore, is it possible to gauge a point when peace ended and war began, or are things far less straightforward than that? Indeed history friends, sometimes simple formulas do not quite work, and the rules of diplomatic history do not apply, but either way, a storm was coming which the Habsburgs, if only they would actually wake up and smell the approaching doom!Remember history friends, YOU are the glue that holds WDF together! Without you, there's no tales about Louis XIV, none about Kara Mustafa, and no WDF in general! What a terrible thought, but if you want to make this history nerd world of ours a better place, why not head on over to Patreon and see what we can do for you? I have so much great plans for WDF into the future, and all patrons will get to feast upon a range of wonderful goods. Whether its $2, $5 or $25, your support is what enabled me to work on this joy of mine, so let's keep it going well into the future! www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 36 Minutes 13 Nov 2017

Our coverage of the complex and juicy diplomacy continues! While the main event is the examination at last of the Habsburg-Polish treaty of alliance, the events leading up to such an event are also something to behold. The French threat remained strong and Louis XIV's presence across the Rhine remained a menace to those German potentates who otherwise would have jumped at the chance to crusade against the Turk. This, as we've by now learned, was no accident. By keeping the Habsburgs and their German allies divided, Louis could ensure that he had more security and influence to lord over his weaker German neighbours.As the episode progresses, you'll notice the sense of re-arming that seemed to characterise much of what the Germans in particular were doing. Everyone seemed either to be grouping themselves into an alliance bloc or preparing for some kind of conflict. At the top of this alliance building we find the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, led of course by King Jan Sobieski, and the subject of our very special biography if you weren't aware!It would prove a battle in itself not merely negotiating, but also ratifying this treaty in the Polish Sejm, as the vested interests of the foreign powers culminated, not for the last time, in heated scenes at such a weighted time in Polish history. In the event, Sobieski would agree to march, but the campaign would be nothing like what he expected...Remember history friends, you can help make WDF thrive! Head on over to www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails now and support us to bring history podcasting to new heights and receive some awesome audio goodies in return! For everything else, make sure to head to www.wdfpodcast.com and as always, For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 34 Minutes 06 Nov 2017

Albert Caprara has a really bad time in this episode, as he is plucked from his far more enjoyable job in the University of Bologna and selected by Leopold to negotiate with the Turks. These same Turks who had been preparing themselves for war for the last few months, were found by Caprara to have been - surprise surprise - preparing themselves for war, rather than preparing themselves to sign a new peace treaty with the Habsburgs.News of this development comes slowly to Vienna though, and in the meantime there is plenty to distract Leopold's court over the course of 1682. A number of initiatives directed towards the French spring up in Germany, as William III attempts to arrange something of use with the Swedes, as the Emperor looks on, only ever so gradually and reluctantly turning his attentions to the east, beyond the Hungarian wasteland, and towards a threat which was preparing to achieve its crowning glory at his expense.Remember history friends, YOU can help make history thrive! Check out our website www.wdfpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter @wdfpodcast and visit the blog www.wdfpodcast.com/thevassalstateFor those that want to take history and this lovely pod even further, remember that there's some wonderful extras and rewards to be had on our Patreon www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails check us out now at the $5 level to feast upon our Jan Sobieski biography! Thanksssss :D For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 47 Minutes 01 Nov 2017

What an incredible treat we have for you today! Norman Ohler, internationally bestselling author responsible for one of the most significant new perspectives on the Third Reich and Adolf Hitler joins us on the podcast for a very special collaboration. Ohler's ideas have been plucked straight from the previously underrated notes of Dr Theodor Morell, Hitler's personal physician, so you know they hold water, as Morell saw Hitler more than anyone else in the last portion of his life. A window into the insane world of Nazi Germany is what Ohler's book provides, as the use and abuse of a whole range of drugs sheds stunning new light on what we think we know about Hitler, the Nazis and their greatest military triumphs. We talk about: the state of drug use in both the Weimar Republic and the Third Reich before the outbreak of WW2, where the happy pill Pervitin came into all this, how careful Ohler had to be in expressing his views, the controversies and critics, the much-appreciated praise, the research process, incredible facts about the archives and how untouched they remain to this day, the hypocrisy and myths surrounding the Nazis and their willing abuse of drugs, the way in which Hitler came to depend upon the cocktail of drugs which Morell fed to him and what we can take from such incredible revelations. Norman Ohler took time out of his very busy schedule to talk to little old me about his book and I really appreciate it. You can show some love to Ohler and his efforts by visiting his site, and of course buying his book - I can tell you now you won't regret it! https://www.amazon.co.uk/Blitzed-Drugs-Germany-Norman-Ohler/dp/0141983167/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1509123010&sr=8-1&keywords=norman+ohler+blitzed Remember that we wrote a blog post for this episode, so if you want some further analysis or to put faces to some of the names mentioned here, be sure to visit that post in our Vassal State blog, head to www.wdfpodcast.com/thevassalstate As always, remember that WDF is supported by history friends just like YOU! So make sure you tell those that may be interested about this interesting conversation, remember to visit the website www.wdfpodcast.com and consider becoming a patron if you want EVEN MORE from your WDF experience! www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails Thanksssssssss! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 34 Minutes 22 Oct 2017

You have all been very patient, so I am so excited to finally begin unpacking the incredibly fascinating and interconnected era of the 1680s. This episode here should tie us back to the first three episodes we did on Louis XIV, because it relates Leopold’s concerns to the military and diplomatic situation in the west, and explains why exactly Leopold believed until it was almost too late that France, rather than the Ottomans, posed the gravest threat to the Habsburgs in Europe.While the Habsburg alliance with Jan Sobieski and the PLC is probably the most famous outcome of this diplomatic wrangling, before that destination was arrived at, the Habsburgs had to traverse some pretty difficult issues and their agents had to overcome the pre-existing agendas of the other powers, especially when those powers preferred to pursue their own relationships with Louis XIV independent of the Habsburgs.The Electors of Saxony (pictured), Bavaria, Brandenburg, Hanover and so many other minor powers make an appearance, as re-arming becomes the norm, and everyone begins to see the importance in picking a side. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 38 Minutes 15 Oct 2017

Episode 7 of the Long War hits us like a Hungarian-shaped bang, as we are introduced first to the Sultan's method of war making as the resources, men and monies were gathered together by spring 1683, but also to the major incentive which moved the Ottomans to make war. In this episode I explain why I believe the Ottomans chose to attack the Habsburgs after 20 years of peace. The Hungarian situation was simply too ideal to let go, as the nemesis of the Habsburg rule in Hungary, a noble by the name of Imre Thokoly, began his rebellion against Vienna. Calling upon the Turk for support, Thokoly's actions and rebellions seriously contradicted the idea that the Habsburg-Ottoman clash was one of Christian vs Muslim, but that's not all we have to startle you with! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 38 Minutes 10 Oct 2017

In the second part, Sebastian talks to us about all things to do with the Last Siege of Vienna, an event which has really captured our narrative and which will hold our attention for the next few months, so it should come as no surprise that Mr Major was enthralled by it too! What does he like about the event, what myths really struck him about it, and what are some of the dangers about the myths which can be commonly perpetuated? Find out here, in our final part of a lovely collab. A huge thankssss again to Mr Major, and if you want to check out his wonderful pod be sure to head on over to www.ourfakehistory.com For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 34 Minutes 08 Oct 2017

In this episode we examine the relationship between the Ottoman Empire and its most important vassal, the Crimean Tartars. How this relationship was formed, the extent to which the Ottomans relied upon this steppe people and the utter devastation which said people could inflict - all of these are critically important topics to wrap our heads around if we're to grasp what was to come for Europe was a particular vengeance in summer 1683... Remember history friends, I rely on your support both moral and monetary and I appreciate it all so much - we are bring history and WDF to more people than ever before, and if you want to be a part of this journey then make sure you check us out on Patreon: www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails Our website: www.wdfpodcast.com Our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/ Our Twitter: https://twitter.com/wdfpodcast Yaaay let's make history thrive :D Zack For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 25 Minutes 05 Oct 2017

Hello there! It's a good day to be a listener of WDF, because I've managed to convince myself to share the first episode of the EXCLUSIVE biography on Jan Sobieski, a 12 part series which will keep us fed and watered in the Xtra feed for the remainder of this year, and which will be releasing every single week until the final week of 2017! YOWZA! What can you expect from this series, and what exactly did Sobieski do when he wasn't charging to the rescue of his peers outside Vienna in 1683? Well, as you'll soon discover, there's so much more to Sobieski than merely Vienna and its siege. He is our window into the era of the turbulent 17th century. He is our weather gauge as we measure the turmoil which afflicted the portion of Europe around the Polish-Russian-Ukrainian border. As a story it sets us up well for our new Podcast on Poland in the 18th century, which is due out on in April, 2018. I hope you'll give it a listen, and remember if you want the full story, this whopper and wonderful series, as well as so many others, are only a few clicks away! Thankssss history friends, and I hope to welcome you soon to the best band of history fans this side of audio! :D Go to www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails today to begin your Xtra feed membership! For only $5 a month you could be accessing incredible content just like this, as well as so much other quality stuff! For the price of a really overpriced coffee that you didn't even enjoy the other day, you could also be helping to make history THRIVE! Thankssss guys, you're all awesome :D For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 62 Minutes 03 Oct 2017

Sebastian Major, otherwise known as the man, the myth, the legend behind Our Fake History, joins us for the first of two parts in this very special collab. In this first part, we talk to Sebby on a personal level, history podcaster to history podcaster, and find out what makes him tick, why he decided to begin history podcasting, what his day job is and why exactly the concept of Our Fake History so appealed to him in the first place. So much more goes on in here that I can't even recount it all, but join us here if you like your conversations fun and the atmosphere warm. You can find Mr Major on his podcast's website http://ourfakehistory.com/ Remember history friends, if you want BOTH parts right away, you can join us on Patreon, and be a part of the best group of history friends this side of audio! Head on over to www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails and from as little as $2 a month, YOU can avail of some audio goodies! Thanksssss! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 31 Minutes 01 Oct 2017

Check the screen and a map of the Hungarian plain should be there - if not do let me know! In this episode we continue our narrative of the period immediately following the fall of Hungary and the escalation of the Ottoman-Habsburg rivalry. We investigate why that rivalry was so potent and how effected the relationships and development of the two states. The 17th century had taught the Habsburgs much, but the Ottomans seemed surprisingly content to rest on their laurels, even while they confronted an allied army at the Battle of St Gotthard. At first, all seemed well, but this victory would in time solidify the hostility between both camps, and lead us handily to the situation we find ourselves in by 1683, so make sure you listen in! Thankssss! Remember history friends, I rely on your support both moral and monetary and I appreciate it all so much - we are bring history and WDF to more people than ever before, and if you want to be a part of this journey then make sure you check us out on Patreon: www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails Our website: www.wdfpodcast.com Our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/ Our Twitter: https://twitter.com/wdfpodcast Yaaay let's make history thrive :D Zack For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 31 Minutes 24 Sep 2017

Louis II, King of Hungary and many other places, ruled over a kingdom that hid a terrible secret. Not only had his nobility eroded the central power of the Crown, but on his doorstep was a great and terrifying enemy which he was terminally unable to halt. As unbalanced as the power match was, neither he nor his neighbours could imagine what would befall the spectators of Europe following the 1526 Battle of Mohacs. Stop by here history friends and patrons, as we begin our climb towards the peak of this tale, outside the walls of Vienna! Thankssss! Remember history friends, I rely on your support both moral and monetary and I appreciate it all so much - we are bring history and WDF to more people than ever before, and if you want to be a part of this journey then make sure you check us out on Patreon: www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails Our website: www.wdfpodcast.com Our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/ Our Twitter: https://twitter.com/wdfpodcast Yaaay let's make history thrive :D Zack For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 35 Minutes 17 Sep 2017

In this episode we examine the War of the Reunions, as Spain finally gets sick of Louis' penchant for milking treaties and history. What follows is a bit of a smacking about of Spain, since everyone else is either busy or doesn't care. By the time of its conclusion, Louis will have grabbed what he wanted, but at what cost? Let's find out, in our last episode in the West before we turn our attention to the goings on in Vienna! Remember history friends, I rely on your support both moral and monetary and I appreciate it all so much - we are bring history and WDF to more people than ever before, and if you want to be a part of this journey then make sure you check us out on Patreon: www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails Our website: www.wdfpodcast.com Our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/ Our Twitter: https://twitter.com/wdfpodcast Yaaay let's make history thrive :D Zack For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 36 Minutes 10 Sep 2017

Welcome back to the post-Nijmegen age of the early 1680s - you haven't been gone long! Herein we detail how Louis XIV planned to get what he wanted and turn the situation around in Europe. The war with the Dutch hadn't been universally satisfying, and to compensate, Louis sought to bring the peace to its logical conclusion. Before war would be arrived at, it remained to push the envelope as far as possible, and no better example of this exists than what Louis XIV did in Lorraine, a duchy on the eastern border of France which had more than its fair share of French schemes over the last few years. Louis was looking to take this to next level, and it is through the lens of what Louis tried to do in Lorraine that we explain what we trying to do on a wider scale with the so-called Reunions. Sound boring? IT'S NOT! Give it a listen, and make sure to let me know what you think! Remember history friends, I rely on your support both moral and monetary and I appreciate it all so much - we are bring history and WDF to more people than ever before, and if you want to be a part of this journey then make sure you check us out on Patreon: www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails Our website: www.wdfpodcast.com Our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/ Our Twitter: https://twitter.com/wdfpodcast Yaaay let's make history thrive :D Zack For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 57 Minutes 05 Sep 2017

[PATRONS] Welcome to our first collab after Five Weeks To Run Wild! Joining us today is the one and only, Daniele Bolelli, and he and I have a great conversation about all sorts of goings on in the world of history podcasting. How did Daniele get into academia? What's his thought process when designing a new episode? Which medium does he truly prefer? All of these are questions asked and answered here, so I hope you enjoy this brilliant talk between two history podcasters. A huge thanksss again to Daniele for making this happen, and be sure to check him out at his website http://www.danielebolelli.com/ as well as http://historyonfirepodcast.com/episodes/ and finally http://thedrunkentaoist.com/ For those of you that are just joining us for the first time, you can find more When Diplomacy Fails in the following places: our website www.wdfpodcast.com on Twitter @wdfpodast on Facebook as FB Page "When Diplomacy Fails Podcast" and through emailing me directly if you have a question or comment to add wdfpodcast@hotmail.com For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 44 Minutes 03 Sep 2017

At long last, we're back! In our special series covering the Long War, we bring you the series of interconnected conflicts which waged across Europe between 1679-1699, and included everything from Reunions, to the last siege of Vienna, to the Glorious Revolution, to the War of the League of Augsburg...PHEW! We're in for the long haul with this LONG war, so I hope to have you with me for the very entertaining ride. Since WDF is now officially my job - partly at least - we are here to bring you the best and worst of the era, starting, appropriately enough, with Louis XIV in a France barely removed from the Franco-Dutch War. The dust had settled, but it was clear that nothing would ever be the same and, more importantly, that Louis XIV was not finished yet. Remember history friends, I rely on your support both moral and monetary and I appreciate it all so much - we are bring history and WDF to more people than ever before, and if you want to be a part of this journey then make sure you check us out on Patreon: www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails Our website: www.wdfpodcast.com Our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/ Our Twitter: https://twitter.com/wdfpodcast Yaaay let's make history thrive :D Zack For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 13 Minutes 02 Sep 2017

Amazing! That is the best word to describe our situation now. Thanks to your guys' support with Patreon, When Diplomacy Fails Podcast is now officially MY JOB! It's finally happened and I couldn't be more excited to let you guys in on this brilliant news, as well some other great updates, so have a listen in here if you guys are interested! Thankssss to my lovely patrons for making this transition in my life possible. Thanks to all of you, I now get to do what I LOVE for a living, and I can't tell you how much I appreciate it. If you want to sign up and contribute to what is now my LIVING (I know right!) then follow this linky pie here www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails Remember our website too www.wdfpodcast.com Thanksssss! :D For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 41 Minutes 29 Aug 2017

Hey guys, welcome to the first proper feature episode of WDF THINKS! Here we begin what will hopefully be a common trend, of releasing an episode in line with an accompanying blog post, so follow this link here if you're interested in checking the episode out. http://www.wdfpodcast.com/thevassalstate/thetragicheir In this episode we examine the tragic but fascinating case of Alexis, son and heir to the greatest ruler Russia had ever known, Peter the Great. Peter did great things for Russia, and is rightly viewed today as a great reformer and thinker. Yet, as we discover here, Peter appreciated that such great gains came with a cost. His regime was vulnerable to inner revolt, and Peter was willing to do anything to find such revolts and squash them before they turned into an open rebellion. Just how willing was he? The title says it all, but let's just say that when it came to fatherhood, Tsar Peter was anything but Great. ********** History friends! If you enjoyed this episode be sure to let me know through the usual channels! Find everything you need on our site www.wdfpodcast.com Support us on Patreon for great goodies and rewards www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails Remember find us on Facebook and Twitter too! Thanksssssssss For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 19 Minutes 20 Aug 2017

Continuing our analysis of Louis XIV's Arms & Armies in the month of August, we've got some absolutely brilliant content on the way for all $5 patrons of this podcast! Remember to check us out at www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails if you want to join the party, but what's in the box here? Well in our four episodes for August we have the following tasters: Episode 6: the importance of quartering is further examined, as is the massive emphasis in the French command on siege warfare, as Vauban developed new ways to make the French attack unbeatable to the defender. Episode 7: we begin an enlightening look at the French navy with some incredible facts and figures - yes, the French navy really was the largest in Western Europe - the problem was, it was split between two seas. Episode 8: our coverage of the French naval arm continues, as we examine how naval officers, rare as they were during the period, honed their craft and sought advancement in a state still very dominated by the idea of military service on land. Episode 9: we conclude our analysis of the navy by examining how things became more familiar to those that know their history. The French decline in naval power came in the 1690s, when they began to spend more on the land armies and less on seapower, with the result that the French state navy resorted to some very effective and lucrative piratical policies. It wasn't what Colbert would have wanted, but it still stands out as an incredible period of history, when Louis XIV was able to hold his enemies at bay on sea and on land simultaneously. If any of these episodes sound interesting to you, my dear history friends, then be sure to have a look at the patreon page www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails once there you'll find a whole load of additional Xtra content, not to mention that there's a whole load of content to come, with a Jan Sobieski biography and of course a Bismarck biography exclusively for Patrons at the $5 level still to come. It's all very exciting indeed, so I hope you'll take a look! I hope also that you're looking forward to our normal episodic coverage resuming from Monday 4th September 2017 when we begin our examination of the Long War - this is going to be epic, and I'm so excited to begin! Remember you can follow us on Twitter @wdfpodcast and find us on Facebook to keep up to date with the latest in our schedule and news. You should also visit the website www.wdfpodcast.com Other than that, thanksssss for listening history friends, you're the best! :D For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 41 Minutes 05 Aug 2017

Welcome to the WDF newsroom! Here we have a very informative episode which aims to bring you guys up to speed on some very exciting news. We are making better use of the Facebook page, and plan to build up a regular schedule of posts over the week to keep our FB followers entertained, so don't miss out! Also make sure you check out the Twitter @wdfpodcast where we'll be making polls and reaching out to all interested history friends. WDF THINKS is incoming, and gives you guys the chance to have a say in what we'll cover in WDF. Stay tuned for more information, but it promises to be a great opportunity to break off from our usual programming to explore some new topics. Keep an eye on the blog as well, go to www.wdfpodcast.com/thevassalstate to read our weekly articles, released every Wednesday for your reading pleasure! Of course we must also talk about how changes are coming to the Patrons of this podcast. From 4th September 2017, $2 Patrons will be able to access the AXESS feed, which will give you early listening privileges, ad and BEFIT free episodes and the chance to binge on groups of episodes as they're released in a block. We're giving all history friends a choice - if you wanted to support but didn't think you'd have time to justify the XTRA feed's content, now there's a great alternative for you guys to enjoy. Finally, the other purpose of this episode was to explain what's to come in WDF's schedule. If you're interested, and not afraid of spoilers, make sure you stick around for the last third or so of the episode, where from 27:00 we'll be enlightening you guys on what's to come in WDF, effectively for the next two+ years. Any comments, questions or queries etc., you all know where to find me! A small reminder to check out the Patreon page of course - www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails Thanksssssss! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 22 Minutes 23 Jul 2017

For the month of July the Xtra feed is lit up with five installments of Louis XIV's Arms & Armies, a very exciting and fascinating 10 part series (with the tenth part released in September) looking at how Louis managed to wage war with his troops, what he changed in the French state to make it happen and what the legacy of such changes was. It makes for some very interesting listening, and herein we give you a sample of each of the five episodes releasing in the Xtra feed in July, so I hope you'll check them out! For the record, here's a brief rundown of each ep. Episode 1: setting the scene of 17th century warfare and the French experience, how France had been threatened and how Louis planned to react. Episode 2: how Louis furthered the changes advanced by his predecessors in the constitution of French armies; how the armies wielded by the state went from mostly mercenaries to state funded and organised institutions in their own right, and how Louis XIV organised the monies around to pay for them. Episode 3: technology of infantry, above all the musket, and how it was gradually upgraded and adapted to make the most efficient use of its strengths, while making allowances for its limitations on the field. Episode 4: how the terrible impact of warfare in the 17th century forced Louis' armies to adapt and develop their own military drill, which came in time to represent a set of hard and fast rules religiously adhered to by each rank and file soldier. The aim was to produce an unthinking and unfearing killing machine, answerable only to his officers and immune to the concerns posed by the warfare waging around him. Episode 5: How the obsession for security in Louis' mind prompted Vauban to advocate the siege above all, and how the siege came to represent the fundamental backbone of all military procedures going forward, rather than the less conclusive and more costly pitched battle. I hope you enjoy these teasers history friends, and if you do, I hope again that you'll consider joining up to the greatest history club in podcasting, if I do say so myself! Check out www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails and sign up at the $5 level now to access all of this great content and so much more besides! Remember also to follow us on Twitter @wdfpodcast Visit the website: www.wdfpodcast.com Follow the journey on Facebook too! Thanksssssss! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 25 Minutes 21 Jul 2017

"History does not repeat itself, but it does rhyme, said Mark Twain. From the fall of the Roman Empire to the rise of the modern world: history ebbs and flows over the centuries, driven by great tides of economic, social, political, religious, and cultural change that shape the world and everyone who lives on it. In this new series from Wondery, PhD historian Patrick Wyman (Fall of Rome) brings the cutting edge of that history to listeners in plain, relatable English. Premieres July 20th." Subscribe by clicking here! https://smarturl.it/TOH Hello history friends! This is the latest podcast project from Pat Wyman, and here at WDF we are very excited to point you guys towards his new show! It promises to be as engaging and well-produced as any historical film, so make sure and check it out by going to https://smarturl.it/TOH In addition, if you lovely listeners could please check out this very short survey it'd really help us folks at the Agora Podcast Network out, and we'd all really appreciate it! Thanksss! https://podcastsurvey.typeform.com/to/OX7nLd. . .

  Direct Link   Download 38 Minutes 25 Jun 2017

Sick of me yet? Honestly history friends, I wouldn't blame you by this stage! Listen in here for my rundown on how I feel this whole crazy project went. Five Weeks To Run Wild - was it all worth it, what would I do differently, how was the feedback and what should you expect from WDF in the future. Whether you're a patron or just a regular listener, we've got lots planned, and there's a whole load to be excited about ahead. For the sake of closure, for the sake of ending this whole mad project in a satisfying way, I though it'd be best to wrap my thoughts and plans up all in one somewhat tidy episode, so I hope you'll give it a listen if you want my take on things. Thanksssss to everyone who has supported and joined us on this incredible journey, and to the new Patrons listening on their Xtra feed now - you are all so very welcome! It has been a pleasure, and I can't wait to unleash everything WDF has to offer. Until then though my name is Zack, and I'll be seeing you all soon! Remember that you can join... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 59 Minutes 24 Jun 2017

To wrap up our coverage of the First Italo Ethiopian War and to serve as our final word on the Remastered project (sniff sniff) we have none other than Mr Italy himself, Benjamin Ashwell. Benjamin's a great guy who's been on WDF's radar since the beginning, so it was only right we got him on for a conversation that sheds true light on the plight of Italy, and delves into issues and questions which my analysis could not. Make sure to check Mr Ashwell out by going to http://www.talkinghistorypodcast.com/ and you can also tweet at him and let him know how much you care @TalkHistoryPod Remember also history friends, to make sure that you BEFIT! Visit our website www.wdfpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter @wdfpodcast Find us on Patreon by going to www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 27 Minutes 24 Jun 2017

As the war is provoked between Italy and Ethiopia, Francesco Crispi attempts to bring about a victory overseas which would bolster Italian unity at home and Italian prestige in the world concert of powers, but all of these ambitions would be foiled by a tenacious defender far from Italian sensibilities, who, would you believe it, was in fact a lost white man! I hope you enjoyed this, the last uniform remastered episode in this project. Please do get in touch and let me know what you thought of it overall, and make sure you stay tuned for one more collaboration episode. Remember also history friends, to make sure that you BEFIT! Visit our website www.wdfpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter @wdfpodcast Find us on Patreon by going to www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 31 Minutes 24 Jun 2017

The cursed episode returns, as we do our best to improve upon the howlers we made first time around. A revamped episode is your reward, and here we examine the complexities of Italian unification, and how the strength Rome tried to project was mostly paper thin. How this would lead to outbursts in Africa, is another story. Remember also history friends, to make sure that you BEFIT! Visit our website www.wdfpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter @wdfpodcast Find us on Patreon by going to www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 31 Minutes 23 Jun 2017

By bringing the war to an end, much of what Bismarck had striven to achieve in Europe fell to pieces. Yet, Bismarck's careful alliance system was far from the only casualty of the peace - the Ottoman Empire, it seemed, was on its last legs. Britain's task of protecting Constantinople from Russia had come close to another war, but it was evidently a task that was far from finished. Remember also history friends, to make sure that you BEFIT! Visit our website www.wdfpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter @wdfpodcast Find us on Patreon by going to www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 31 Minutes 23 Jun 2017

As the revolts in their Balkan territories casts a shadow over the Ottoman Empire's ability to conduct itself on the world stage, the other powers weigh in on the debate. Disraeli attempted to ignore the problem, as did Bismarck, while the Vienna watched Bosnia with a barely veiled hunger. Let's see what went down! Remember also history friends, to make sure that you BEFIT! Visit our website www.wdfpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter @wdfpodcast Find us on Patreon by going to www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .

  Direct Link   Download 31 Minutes 22 Jun 2017

A conflict which should be eerily familiar to you guys, as we've sallied forth into its events and impact on Britain for our Britain Goes To War series. Why should you listen in here? Mainly because this time our focus will not be on Britain alone, and we'll have the opportunity to place all of the continent under the microscope, so come and join us for this important scene setting experience. Thanksss! Remember also history friends, to make sure that you BEFIT! Visit our website www.wdfpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter @wdfpodcast Find us on Patreon by going to www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy. . .