Ottoman History Podcast

Podcast by Ottoman History Podcast. Ottoman History Podcast began in March of 2011 as an experiment aimed at finding an alternative form of academic production that explores new and more accessible media and allows for a collaborative approach. Our recorded interviews and lectures, while still largely academic in tone, provide serious and constructive academic discussion in an accessible and almost human format that is easy on the brain and eyes.

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  Direct Link   Download 40 Minutes 29 Feb 2016

E227 | During the late eighteenth century, a series of volcanic eruptions at a site called Laki in Iceland created climatic effects that spanned the entire globe. In this episode, Alan Mikhail shares his research on the impacts of these eruptions on the agrarian economy of Ottoman Egypt through an explanation of the localized climatic and environmental effects of Laki on the Nile River. We discuss how climatic events shape or accelerate historical processes and explore how climate history can serve as a means of thinking about unseen connections between different world regions. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/02/ottoman-iceland.html Alan Mikhail is Professor of History at Yale University. He is the author of The Animal in Ottoman Egypt (New York: Oxford University Press, 2014) and Nature and Empire in Ottoman Egypt (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011) and editor of Water on Sand: Environmental Histories of the Middle East and North Africa (New York: Oxford University Press, 2013). Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. CREDITS Episode No. 227 Release Date: 29 February 2016 Recording Location: Yale University Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Kara Güneş - Istanbul; Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Turnalar Turnalar - Darulelhan Heyeti Image "Lava fjelds in Iceland" via Library of Congress Map courtesy of Alan Mikhail and Stacey Maples Bibliography courtesy of Alan Mikhail See Alan Mikhail. "Ottoman Iceland: A Climate History". Environmental History. 20, no. 2 (2015): 262-284.. . .