Ottoman History Podcast

Podcast by Ottoman History Podcast. Ottoman History Podcast began in March of 2011 as an experiment aimed at finding an alternative form of academic production that explores new and more accessible media and allows for a collaborative approach. Our recorded interviews and lectures, while still largely academic in tone, provide serious and constructive academic discussion in an accessible and almost human format that is easy on the brain and eyes.

All Episodes

  Direct Link   Download 37 Minutes 25 Jul 2017

E327 | Visual sources such as photographs, maps, and miniatures often serve as accompaniment or adornment within works of Ottoman history. In this episode, we feature new work that interrogates methods of analyzing and employing visual sources for Ottoman history that go beyond the practice of "image as decoration." Following a conversation with the organizers of the "Visual Sources in Late Ottoman History" conference held at Columbia University in April 2017, we speak to conference participants about the visual sources they employ in their work and how these visual sources allow us to understand the history of the Ottoman Empire and post-Ottoman world in a new light. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/07/columbia-visual.html CREDITS Episode No. 327 Release Date: 25 July 2017 Recording Location: Columbia University Audio editing by Chris Gratien Music: from Excavated Shellac - Lili Labassi - Mazal Haye Mazal; from archive.org - Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla; Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Murat Kenarinda - Agyazar Efendi Egil Daglar Ustunden Asam - Viktoriya Hanim; Nazmiye - Rizeli Sadik; Muzaffer Akgun - Ha Bu Diyar Special thanks to Kara Günes for permission to use the composition "Istanbul" and Sato Moughalian for "Miayn Kez" Recordings by Michael Ferguson, Michael Talbot, Seçil Yılmaz, and Sam Dolbee. . .

  Direct Link   Download 82 Minutes 20 Jul 2017

E326 | Commodities, their circulation, and their consumption have long been favorite topics of cultural and economic historians alike. In this episode, we build on the historiography of commodities by studying further the social and political context of two particular commodities: coffee and marijuana. Our guests, Casey Lurtz and Lina Britto, have each studied these commodities in their Latin American contexts, and following a global discussion of coffee and marijuana with some focus on the Middle East, we talk to each of these scholars about their respective research projects. We examine how the arrival of coffee impacted local political economies in Mexico, and we explore how the history of marijuana as a "drug" has had political consequences for modern Latin American countries. We conclude with a roundtable discussion on the history of commodities like coffee and marijuana and what they tell us about the changing cultural context surrounding both these items today. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/07/coffee-marijuana.html Lina Britto is assistant professor of History at Northwestern University. Her research explores the origins of the U.S.-Colombia drug connection, while her teaching focuses on modern Latin America, and processes of nation-state formation, popular culture, and violence. Casey Lurtz is an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies, was previously the Newcomen Fellow at the Harvard Business School, and will be joining the history department at Johns Hopkins University in the fall as an assistant professor. Her research examines globalization from the perspective of rural Latin America. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History and is currently an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. CREDITS Episode No. 326 Release Date: 20 July 2017 Recording Location: Harvard University Audio editing by Chris Gratien Music: from Excavated Shellac- Hermanos Hernández – Eugenia; Luna y Delgado – Sal A Tus Puertas; Nicandro Castillo con sus Huastecos – El Llorar; from archive.org - Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla Special thanks to Kara Günes for permission to use the composition "Istanbul" Images and bibliography courtesy of Casey Lurtz and Lina Britto available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/07/coffee-marijuana.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 42 Minutes 18 Jul 2017

E325 | A perennial question in Ottoman history is why printing was not fully adopted in the Middle East for the production of books until the late nineteenth century. Armenians, however, did start to print their books as early as the sixteenth century. In this episode, Sebouh Aslanian explains this rather sudden shift by telling the story of how the twin traumas of the Celali Rebellions and Shah Abbas’s scorched-earth campaigns against the Ottoman Empire spurred the mass migration of Armenians away from their traditional centers in the Eastern fringes of Anatolia, the Armenian Plateau and the Caucasus and toward major cities of Western Anatolia and Iran. As the traditional centers of Armenian manuscript production were disrupted by war and banditry, Armenians turned to printing presses in the European diaspora to satisfy their needs for books. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/07/julfans.html Sebouh Aslanian is Associate professor of history and Richard Hovannisian Endowed Chair of Modern Armenian History at UCLA. He is he author of From the Indian Ocean to the Mediterranean: The Global Trade Networks of Armenian Merchants from New Julfa (Berkley: University of California Press, 2011) and Dispersion History and the Polycentric Nation: The Role of Simeon Yerevants‘i's Girk‘ or Kochi Partavchar in the Armenian National Revival (Venice: 2004) and is currently completing a book manuscript titled Early Modernity and Mobility: Port Cities and Printers Across the Armenian Diaspora, 1512-1800. Nir Shafir is a historian of the Middle East whose research examines the intersections of knowledge production, religious practice, and material culture in the early modern world. He curates Ottoman History Podcast’s series on history of science in addition to being one of the co-founders of hazine.info, a website that explores the archives and libraries of the Islamic world. He is an assistant professor of history at UCSD. CREDITS Episode No. 325 Release Date: 18 July 2017 Recording Location: Long Beach, CA Audio editing by Chris Gratien Music: Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla Special thanks to Kara Günes for permission to use the composition "Istanbul" and to Sato Moughalian for "Tamzara" Images and bibliography courtesy of Sebouh Aslanian available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/07/julfans.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 50 Minutes 15 Jul 2017

E324 | Genetics have emerged as a new scientific tool for studying human ancestry and historical migration. And as research into the history of genetics demonstrates, genetics and other bioscientific approaches to studying ancestry were also integral to the transformation of the very national and racial categories through which ancestry has come to be described over the course of the 19th and 20th centuries. In this podcast, we speak to Elise Burton about her research on the development of human genetics in the Middle East. Burton has studied the history of genetics within a comparative framework, examining the interrelated cases of human genetics research in Turkey, Israel, Iran, and elsewhere. In this episode, we focus in particular on the history of genetics in Turkey and its relationship to changing understandings of nation and race within the early Republic. In a bonus segment (see below), we also look under the hood of commercial genetic ancestry tests to understand present-day science within the context of these historical developments. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/07/genetics.html Elise Burton just earned her PhD in History and Middle Eastern Studies from Harvard in May 2017 and her BA in Middle Eastern Studies and Integrative Biology from UC Berkeley in May 2010. Come October, she will begin a Junior Research Fellowship at Newnham College, University of Cambridge. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History and is currently an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. Shireen Hamza is a doctoral student in the History of Science department at Harvard University. Her research focuses broadly on the history of science and medicine in the Islamicate Middle Ages, and more specifically on the history of women's health. Maryam Patton is a PhD student at Harvard University in the History and Middle Eastern Studies program. She studies the history of ideas and books in the Early Modern Mediterranean. CREDITS Episode No. 324 Release Date: 16 July 2017 Recording Location: Cambridge, MA Audio editing by Chris Gratien Music: from Excavated Shellac - Lili Labassi - Mazal Haye Mazal; from archive.org - Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla Special thanks to Kara Günes for permission to use the composition "Istanbul" Images and bibliography courtesy of Elise Burton available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/07/genetics.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 48 Minutes 15 Jul 2017

In this bonus conversation, Chris Gratien and Elise Burton reflect on the science behind commercial genetic ancestry tests and the National Geographic Genographic Project within their historical context. For the main episode and much more, visit http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/07/genetics.html.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 44 Minutes 06 Jul 2017

E323 | In this collaboration with The Southeast Passage, we discuss the emergence of the Turkish nationalist movement under the leadership of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk and the establishment of a sovereign Republic of Turkey in 1923. As our guest Prof. Erik-Jan Zürcher notes, Kemalism can be studied both as a political transformation from armed struggle to a one-party state administration system and as a repertoire of discursive symbols based on the imaginary of nation, civilization, and modernity. This installment is structured along a series of lectures that Prof. Zürcher has given at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris, in which he has framed Kemalism’s activism and worldview within its contemporary international context as well as along a broader chronological axis continuing into the 1950s. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/07/zurcher.html Erik-Jan Zürcher is Professor of Turkish Studies at the University of Leiden (The Netherlands). He has published widely on the period of transition from the Ottoman Empire to the Republic of Turkey from the point of view of social, economic, and political history. Professor Zürcher is also a member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. Andreas Guidi is a Ph.D. candidate at the Humboldt University in Berlin and at the EHESS in Paris researching on networks, generations, and capital transmission in late and post-Ottoman Rhodes. He is also the creator of the Southeast Passage podcast. Elif Becan is a Ph.D. Candidate at the CETOBaC/EHESS in Paris. Her doctoral research focuses on the categorization of outsiders through the case of populations of Albanian origin in Turkey in the first half of the 20th century. CREDITS Episode No. 323 Release Date: 6 July 2017 Recording Location: EHESS, Paris Audio editing by Andreas Guidi Music: Giulio Stermieri – “The Southeast Passage Theme” (intro and outro); Turku, Nomads of the Silk Road – “Ah bir ataş ver” (Creative Commons) Images and bibliography courtesy of Erik-Jan Zürcher available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/07/zurcher.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 33 Minutes 01 Jul 2017

E322 | This episode examines historical approaches to Armenians, Kurds, and Turks in the eastern provinces of Ottoman Anatolia. "Shared history" has been offered up as a corrective to the existing historiography's nationalist and often exclusionary approaches, but what does writing a "shared history" actually look like? Yaşar Tolga Cora and Dzovinar Derderian talk about their approaches in their recent 2016 edited volume, The Ottoman East in the Nineteenth Century: Societies, Identities and Politics. The volume discusses Trans-regional Connectivity; the fluidity of identities and loyalties, state and local politics; and the social history of space. They draw on the work to unpack the political and scholarly challenges of writing a "shared history" for an area that has been and still is marked by deep conflicts. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/07/ottoman-east.html Yaşar Tolga Cora received his Ph.D. in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations from the University of Chicago in 2016 and is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the Armenian Studies Program and History Department at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He focuses on the social history of Armenian communities in the Eastern provinces of the Ottoman Empire before the Genocide. Dzovinar Derderian is a Ph. D. Candidate in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at the University of Michigan. Her dissertation explores iterations of belonging to nation and empire through love, law and knowledge among Ottoman Armenians of Van in the mid-nineteenth century. Matthew Ghazarian is a Ph.D. Candidate in Columbia University's Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, African Studies. His research focuses on the intersections of sectarianism, humanitarianism, and political economy in central and eastern Anatolia between 1856 and 1893. CREDITS Episode No. 322 Release Date: 1 July 2017 Recording Location: Boston, MA Audio editing by Matthew Ghazarian Music: Katibim (Üsküdar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla and Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer Images and bibliography courtesy of Yaşar Tolga Cora, Dzovinar Derderian, and Ohannes Kılıçdağı available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/07/ottoman-east.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 73 Minutes 26 Jun 2017

E321 | What is the aural possibility of Islamic life in the European cities today? This special episode begins with a ten-minute segment from an audio composition crafted by our guest, musicologist Peter McMurray, from recent field recordings and ethnographies he conducted among various Turkish communities in Berlin. As the discussion progresses we weave in and out of two discussions. First, we look at the means by which Turkish migrants from the Alevi, Shi’i, and Sufi communities use the different private and public spaces of the city as a stage for their religiosity. We add to this a second discussion of how ethnography, aesthetics, and the aural intersect in scholarship today. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/06/islamicberlin.html Peter McMurray is an ethnomusicologist and media artist. He is currently a Junior Fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows, where he is completing a book and film project, Pathways to God: The Islamic Acoustics of Turkish Berlin. He holds a PhD from Harvard in Ethnomusicology and an MFA from Brandeis in Music Composition. Other research interests include South Slavic oral poetry and music/sound among Syrian refugees. Nir Shafir is a historian of the Middle East whose research examines the intersections of knowledge production, religious practice, and material culture in the early modern world (1400-1800). He curates Ottoman History Podcast’s series on history of science in addition to being one of the co-founders of hazine.info, a website that explores the archives and libraries of the Islamic world. He is currently assistant professor of history at UCSD. Huma Gupta is a Ph.D. student at the Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture (AKPIA) at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her dissertation research focuses on the structural relationships between urban planning, architecture, state formation and migration in modern Iraq. She is also interested in the sonic and visual past and continues to think of ways to integrate sensory histories into her research. CREDITS Episode No. 321 Release Date: 26 June 2017 Recording Location: Cambridge, MA Audio editing by Chris Gratien Audio segments: "God Listens To Those Who Praise Him (introduction/excerpt from 48', 16-channel audio piece)" by Peter McMurray Untitled video, Commemoration of 1993 Sivas Massacre by the Berlin Alevi Association (July 2015) recorded by Peter McMurray Holy Weeping (Amplified) (excerpts from 30', 4-channel audio piece) by Peter McMurray Images and bibliography courtesy of Peter McMurray. . .

  Direct Link   Download 65 Minutes 24 Jun 2017

E320 | The distance between the shores of the Ottoman Empire and New York City may be great, but, as this episode suggests, a great many connections exist between these places, too. This episode explores both the everyday lives of those hailing from the Ottoman domains over several centuries in the Big Apple, as well as the perceptions New Yorkers and Americans more generally had of the Ottoman Empire. Through visits to sites across the island of Manhattan, we shed light on the long and largely forgotten shared history of the Ottoman Empire and New York City, and we find it in unlikely places – such as a modest walk-up apartment on the Upper East Side – as well as in the shadow of New York landmarks like 1 World Trade Center and the Stonewall Inn. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/06/ottoman-new-york.html Bruce Burnside is a Ph.D. candidate in Anthropology and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. His own podcast City Between can be found at https://citybetween.com/ Sam Dolbee completed his Ph.D. in 2017 at New York University. His book project is an environmental history of the Jazira region in the late Ottoman period and its aftermath. Episode No. 320 Release Date: 24 June 2017 Recording Location: New York City Audio editing by Chris Gratien and Seçil Yılmaz Music: from archive.org - Tetos Demetriades - Aman Elenio; Katibim (Üsküdar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla; Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer from cdbpdx - Tanious Hamlewe - Taboule; Kahraman - Mankoushi Biziet Images and bibliography courtesy of Bruce Burnside and Sam Dolbee available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/06/ottoman-new-york.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 32 Minutes 22 Jun 2017

E319 | The rise of Islamic modernist movements from the 19th century onward brought two potentially contradictory processes. On the one hand, Muslim thinkers began to imagine an increasingly global Muslim community unified by identity that might transcend many of the communal and political divisions of the day. On the other hand, in seeking to delineate the parameters of modern Islam, such thinkers were impelled to account for the great diversity and heterogeneity within Islamic beliefs and practices. In this episode, we speak to Teena Purohit about her ongoing research on this very subject. Specifically, we discuss the case of Muhammad Iqbal, one of most important Muslim scholars in British South Asia, and his treatment of Mirza Ghulam Ahmad and the Ahmadiyya movement. Through Iqbal's writing on the Ahmadis and other movements of the period, we examine both the religious and political implications of modernist debates about inclusion and orthodoxy in Islam. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/06/ahmadi.html Teena Purohit is Associate Professor of Religion at Boston University. She is the author of The Aga Khan Case: Religion and Identity in Colonial India (HUP, 2012). Shireen Hamza is a doctoral student in the History of Science department at Harvard University. Her research focuses broadly on the history of science and medicine in the Islamicate Middle Ages, and more specifically on the history of women's health. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History and is currently an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. CREDITS Episode No. 319 Release Date: 22 June 2017 Recording Location: Harvard University Audio editing by Chris Gratien Music: from Excavated Shellac - Veena Dhanammal – Javali (Kamas) Special thanks to Kara Günes for permission to use the composition "Istanbul" and Rajna Swaminathan for "Entangled Hierarchy" Bibliography courtesy of Teena Purhoit available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/06/ahmadi.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 48 Minutes 21 Jun 2017

E318 | Long before European contact with the Americas forged transoceanic networks and connections in the Atlantic and Pacific, the Indian Ocean served as a maritime space that connected the many states, economies, and communities of its vast basin stretching from East Africa to Southeast Asia. In this multi-part episode, we follow this maritime space into the modern period, exploring the endurance of Indian Ocean connections. We discuss how commerce and politics fueled the expansion of the Ottoman diplomatic presence in South Asia, and we consider how lingering connections between East Africa and the Indian Ocean world forged by dhow traffic reveal both continuities and transformations in the history of economy, mobility, and empire along the coasts today. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/06/indian-ocean.html Nidhi Mahajan is a Mellon Sawyer Seminar Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Humanities at Tufts University. Her book project titled "Moorings: The Dhow Trade and the State in East Africa" is a historical ethnography of the dhow trade and multiple regulatory regimes in the Western Indian Ocean. Jeffery Dyer is a Ph.D. student in the Department of History at Boston College. He is completing a dissertation on Ottoman engagement with the Arabian Peninsula and the Indian Ocean in the last decades of the empire entitled “Ottomans in the Age of Empire: Ottoman Consular Diplomacy and the Indian Ocean Frontiers of the Arabian Peninsula, 1870-1914.” Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History and is currently an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. Shireen Hamza is a doctoral student in the History of Science department at Harvard University. Her research focuses broadly on the history of science and medicine in the Islamicate Middle Ages, and more specifically on the history of women's health. CREDITS Episode No. 318 Release Date: 21 June 2017 Recording Locations: Boston College / Harvard University Audio editing by Chris Gratien Music: from archive.org - Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla Special thanks to Kara Günes for permission to use the composition "Istanbul", Rajna Swaminathan for "Entangled Hierarchy", and Muhtelif for "Bint El Shalabiya". . .

  Direct Link   Download 48 Minutes 19 Jun 2017

E317 | The history of late Ottoman Palestine and the changes in settlement, agriculture, economy and politics that occurred there remain a subject of great interest for historians of the Middle East. In this episode, our guest Tamar Novick introduces a new approach to that history using the lens of ecology. We explore changes in late Ottoman Palestine through environment and human-animal relations and in particular, the transformation of beekeeping practices that arrived with Europeans during the late 19th century. We learn about how the introduction of movable hives transformed the relationship between beekeepers, bees, and the landscape, and we consider how European settlers saw in the bees of the Holy Land a unique animal stock that could be developed and possibly exported elsewhere while simultaneously casting the bee and apiculture in Ottoman Palestine as a site of technological intervention. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/06/bees.html Tamar Novick is a research scholar at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin, and the co-leader of "The Body of Animals" working group there. Her book manuscript, entitled Milk & Honey: Technologies of Plenty in the Making of a Holy Land, examines how settlers in Palestine in the long 20th century attributed special qualities to their land, and used science and technology to reconstruct a plentiful mystical past – literally, "a land flowing with milk and honey." Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History and is currently an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. CREDITS Episode No. 317 Release Date: 19 June 2017 Recording Location: Harvard University Audio editing by Chris Gratien Music: Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla Special thanks to Kara Günes for permission to use the composition "Istanbul" Images and bibliography courtesy of Tamar Novick available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/06/bees.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 53 Minutes 15 Jun 2017

E316 | Among the many important medieval texts written in Arabic, few have received more attention from scholars in Europe than The Muqaddimah, an introduction to history by the 14th-century North African writer Ibn Khaldun. In this episode, we explore another of arena for reception of Ibn Khaldun, the Ottoman Empire, with our guest Kenan Tekin. In particular, we examine Ottoman translations of Ibn Khaldun's Muqaddimah, especially that of the 19th-century statesman and scholar Ahmet Cevdet. In our discussion of Cevdet's translation of and commentary on Ibn Khaldun's work, we explore the intellectual engagement of Ottoman Tanzimat-era thinkers with ideas from the past centuries of Islamicate scholarship and consider Cevdet's late Ottoman work as an early example of writing about the history of science. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/06/khaldun.html Kenan Tekin is a research assistant at Yalova University. He earned his Ph.D. degree from Columbia University in 2016. His research interests include history and philosophy of science and religion, Ottoman and Islamic intellectual history, and transformations from manuscript to print culture. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History and is currently an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. CREDITS Episode No. 316 Release Date: 15 June 2017 Recording Location: Harvard University Audio editing by Chris Gratien Music: Lili Labassi - Mazal Haye Mazal; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla Special thanks to Kara Günes for permission to use the composition "Istanbul" Images and bibliography courtesy of Kenan Tekin available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/06/khaldun.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 44 Minutes 22 May 2017

E315 | Orientalist representations loom large in the history of 19th-century colonialism and European engagement with the late Ottoman Empire. But how did the orientalist discourses of the late Ottoman period compare with European representations of the Ottoman Empire during its early rise? In this episode, Pascale Barthe revisits this question through the lens of 16th century French encounters with the Ottoman Empire. Through Renaissance period French accounts of travel in and political engagement with the Ottoman Empire, we discuss early Franco-Ottoman rapprochement and cross-cultural exchange pursued by French monarchs and subjects with the would-be eastern other of the "Turk." More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/05/france-ottomans.html Pascale Barthe is Associate Professor of French at the University of North Carolina Wilmington where she teaches a variety of courses on language, literature, and culture, including an undergraduate seminar titled “La France-Méditerranée.” She specializes in early modern France and has focused on cross-cultural relations between Renaissance France and the Ottoman Empire. Her new research project examines political, religious, and literary intersections between the kingdom of Louis XIV and the Safavid and Mughal Empires. She is particularly interested in studying the global experiences of Frenchmen in the middle of the seventeenth century when the Compagnie des Indes Orientales was founded. Nir Shafir is a historian of the Middle East whose research examines the intersections of knowledge production, religious practice, and material culture in the early modern world. He curates Ottoman History Podcast’s series on history of science in addition to being one of the co-founders of hazine.info, a website that explores the archives and libraries of the Islamic world. He is an assistant professor of history at UCSD. Michael Talbot received his PhD from SOAS in 2013 for a thesis on Ottoman-British relations in the eighteenth century, and now lectures and researches on a range of topics in Ottoman history at the University of Greenwich in London. CREDITS Episode No. 315 Release Date: 23 May 2017 Recording Location: MESA Conference, Boston Audio editing by Onur Engin Music: from archive.org - Nusret Yılmaz - Severim Her Güzeli Senden Eserdir Diyerek https://archive.org/details/hicaz_201403, Aziz Türk Sanat Müziği Grubu - Ud Taksimi https://archive.org/details/FaslUdTaksimi Images and bibliography courtesy of Pascale Barthe available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/05/france-ottomans.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 48 Minutes 19 May 2017

E314 | Salonica was home to one of the largest Jewish communities in the Ottoman and post-Ottoman world until its liquidation by the Nazis in 1943. Historians often mark the beginning of the end of the Jewish community in 1913 when the city was annexed by Greece. Devin Naar challenges this presumption in this podcast by looking at how the Jewish community continued to flourish and adapt as part of the new Greek nation-state. Ultimately, the community was both sustained and limited by its continued use of the millet structure from the late nineteenth-century Ottoman Empire and its strong attachment to the city as a political space. As such, the interwar history of the Salonican Jews becomes an important study of the legacies of the Ottoman Empire and the types of politics it continued to create well into the twentieth century. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/05/jewish-salonica.html Devin E. Naar is the Isaac Alhadeff Professor in Sephardic Studies and Associate Professor of Jewish Studies and History at the University of Washington in Seattle, where he directs the Sephardic Studies Program. Naar received his PhD in History from Stanford University, served as a Fulbright Scholar in Greece, and sits on the Academic Advisory Council of Center for Jewish History in New York. Nir Shafir is a historian of the Middle East whose research examines the intersections of knowledge production, religious practice, and material culture in the early modern world. He curates Ottoman History Podcast’s series on history of science in addition to being one of the co-founders of hazine.info, a website that explores the archives and libraries of the Islamic world. He is an assistant professor of history at UCSD. Oscar Aguirre-Mandujano is a PhD candidate in Near and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Washington. His dissertation explores how Ottoman intellectuals and bureaucrats in the 14th and 15th centuries provided models for social and political behavior through the creation of a new literary and poetic language. CREDITS Episode No. 314 Release Date: 19 May 2017 Recording Location: University of Washington Audio editing by Chris Gratien Music: Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla Special thanks to Kara Güneş for permission to use the composition "Istanbul" Images and bibliography courtesy of Devin Naar at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/05/jewish-salonica.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 54 Minutes 16 May 2017

E313 | In political discourses today, the “Muslim world” is evoked in a variety of contexts, ranging from pan-Islamic visions of political unity to a set of racist generalizations that present roughly a fifth of the world’s population as a monolithic whole. But as our guest in this episode, Cemil Aydın explains in his new book The Idea of the Muslim World, the very notion of a Muslim world is recent and requires historicization. In this episode, we explore the imagining of the Muslim World as a concept, tracing its early origins in the history of colonialism and the late Ottoman Empire and considering its transformation over the past century. We also discuss alternate geopolitical imaginaries and reflect on the implications of the racialization of Muslims. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/05/muslim-world.html Cemil Aydın is teaching Ottoman history and global history at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Cemil Aydin’s recent publications include his book on the Politics of Anti-Westernism in Asia (Columbia University Press, 2007) and “Regionen und Reiche in der Politischen Geschichte des Langen 19 Jahrhunderts, 1750-1924 (Region and Empire in the Political History of the Long 19th Century” in Geschichte Der Welt, 1750-1870: Wege Zur Modernen Welt (A History of the World, 1750-1870)“ (Beck Publishers, July 2016) pp: 35-253. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History and is currently an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. Abdul Latif is an MTS student at Harvard Divinity School focusing on Islamic Studies. CREDITS Episode No. 313 Release Date: 16 May 2017 Recording Location: Harvard University Audio editing by Chris Gratien Music: Muzaffer Akgun - Ha Bu Diyar; Lili Labassi - Mazal Haye Mazal; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla Additional segments: "A Short History of the Ertuğrul" by Michael Talbot Images and bibliography courtesy of Cemil Aydın available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/05/muslim-world.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 45 Minutes 25 Apr 2017

E312 | More and more, podcasts are appearing on university syllabi. But is it possible to conduct an entire university course that revolves entirely around the podcast medium? In this special episode, we sit down with Dana Sajdi and a class of over 20 students at Boston College who are enrolled in an experimental course entitled "Podcasting the Ottomans." In our conversation, we take a look inside the syllabus of a course in Ottoman history that relies primarily on episodes of Ottoman History Podcast and we get feedback from students about their daily engagement with the podcast medium and some of the most popular episodes of our program. Our student guests also discuss their short-form podcast final projects and reflect on the joys of learning through podcasts. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/04/podcasting-the-ottomans.html Dana Sajdi is Associate Professor of Middle Eastern History at Boston College. In addition to authoring The Barber of Damascus: Nouveau Literacy in the 18th Century Levant, she is editor of Ottoman Tulips, Ottoman Coffee: Leisure and Lifestyle in the Eighteenth Century (I.B. Tauris, 2008; in Turkish, Koc University Press, 2014). Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History and is currently an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. CREDITS Episode No. 312 Release Date: 26 April 2017 Recording Location: Boston College Audio editing by Chris Gratien Music: Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla; Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep Special thanks to Kara Güneş for permission to use the composition "Istanbul" Syllabus courtesy of Dana Sajdi available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/04/podcasting-the-ottomans.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 53 Minutes 07 Apr 2017

E311 | For much of the twentieth century, military officers have been the most successful political operatives in Middle East politics. In this episode we explore the conditions that gave rise to these figures from their schooling to the disingenuous colonial politics of the interwar mandates. Our guest, Michael Provence, speaks to us about the overlooked the military schools in the late Ottoman Empire that drew in an aspiring middling class of rural Muslims, quite different from the urban and urbane classes that attended the civil schools, and molded them into loyal imperial subjects. We then explore how these men navigated the complex politics of the post-war Middle East as the world that the empire they had championed for so long fell apart around them. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/04/ottoman-military-education.html Michael Provence is Associate Professor of modern Middle Eastern history at UCSD. He is the author of The Great Syrian Revolt (2005), and The Last Ottoman Generation and the Making of the Modern Middle East (May 2017). Nir Shafir is a historian of the Middle East whose research examines the intersections of knowledge production, religious practice, and material culture in the early modern world. He curates Ottoman History Podcast’s series on history of science in addition to being one of the co-founders of hazine.info, a website that explores the archives and libraries of the Islamic world. He is an assistant professor of history at UCSD. Reem Bailony is currently the American Druze Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow at Georgetown University. Her book manuscript tentatively titled, Transnational Rebellion: The Syrian Revolt of 1925-1927, uncovers the critical role Syrian-Lebanese migrants played in defining and shaping the anti-colonial rebellion. CREDITS Episode No. 311 Release Date: 7 April 2017 Recording Location: UC-San Diego Audio editing by Chris Gratien Music: Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Egil Daglar Ustunden Asam - Viktoriya Hanim; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep Special thanks to Kara Güneş for permission to use the composition "Istanbul" Images and bibliography courtesy of Michael Provence available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/04/ottoman-military-education.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 49 Minutes 31 Mar 2017

E310 | The “nahda” is often seen as the beginning of the modern intellectual revival of the Arabs, when European Enlightenment ideas were adopted by Middle Eastern thinkers from the mid-nineteenth century onwards. In this podcast with Peter Hill, we discuss a circle of Syrian Christians in Damietta, Egypt who were actively translating Greek, Italian and French Enlightenment texts into Arabic in the first two decades of the nineteenth century, well before the start of the so-called nahda. Hill describes not only who these translators and patrons were, but also how this challenges diffusionist and connective conceptions of the intellectual history of the Middle East. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/03/DamiettaNahda.html Peter Hill is a Junior Research Fellow at Christ Church, University of Oxford, working on the intellectual history of the Arab world in the nineteenth century. He recently completed a D.Phil. thesis on utopian aspects of the cultural production of the Arab ‘Awakening’ (nahda), and their grounding in the social history of the Arab lands and Ottoman Empire in the long nineteenth century. Nir Shafir is a historian of the Middle East whose research examines the intersections of knowledge production, religious practice, and material culture in the early modern world. He curates Ottoman History Podcast’s series on history of science in addition to being one of the co-founders of hazine.info, a website that explores the archives and libraries of the Islamic world. He is an assistant professor of history at UCSD. Shireen Hamza is a doctoral student in the History of Science department at Harvard University. Her research focuses broadly on the history of science and medicine in the Islamicate Middle Ages, and more specifically on the history of women's health. CREDITS Episode No. 310 Release Date: 1 April 2017 Recording Location: Cambridge, MA Audio editing by Shireen Hamza Music: from Excavated Shellac - Munira al-Mahdiyya – Aldahre Kataâ Awsali; Hocine Slaoui – Yal Cahla Special thanks to Kara Güneş for permission to use the composition "Istanbul" Images and bibliography courtesy of Peter Hill available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/03/DamiettaNahda.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 27 Minutes 30 Mar 2017

E309 | Photography came to the Ottoman empire almost as soon as it was invented in Europe. Over subsequent decades, however, techniques improved, cameras got cheaper and more portable, and photographic production, circulation, and collection in Ottoman lands moved outside of the rarefied circles of the elite studios and the state. In this episode, Ahmet Ersoy discusses one of the main media for this kind of vernacular photography--the illustrated journals of the late Ottoman empire. What can understanding the circulation of images in this form help us to understand about history, identity, and print culture in the late Ottoman Empire, as well as about how to study photography itself? More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/03/illustratedjournals.html Ahmet Ersoy is Associate Professor at the History Department at Boğaziçi University, Istanbul. His work deals with the history of the Late Ottoman Empire with a special focus on the changing role and status of visual culture during a period of westernizing change. He is the author of the book, Architecture and the Late Ottoman Historical Imaginary: Reconfiguring the Architectural Past in a Modernizing Empire, and he is currently pursuing research on the confluence of photography, new media technologies and print culture in the late Ottoman world Susanna Ferguson is a Ph.D. Candidate in Middle Eastern History at Columbia University. She is currently working on a dissertation entitled "Tracing Tarbiya: Women, Gender and Childrearing in Egypt and Lebanon, 1865-1939. CREDITS Episode No. 309 Release Date: 30 March 2017 Recording Location: ANAMED, Istanbul Audio editing by Onur Engin Music: Müzeyyen Senar - Ayrılık Yaman Kelime Images and bibliography courtesy of Ahmet Ersoy available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/03/illustratedjournals.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 35 Minutes 27 Mar 2017

E308 | In 1665, an Izmir-born Rabbi named Sabbatai Sevi (1626-76) was proclaimed to be the Jewish Messiah. His messianic movement attracted tens of thousands of followers and become known throughout the early modern world. Ottoman authorities, however, arrested Sevi in 1666, and, under duress, the charismatic leader converted to Islam. Many members of his movement followed suit and became the communities who today are called dönme (which literally means "convert"). After Sevi's death, dönme communities continued to outwardly practice Islam but inwardly retain practices of Judaism. In this episode, Cengiz Şişman talks about his research on the development of Sevi’s movement, the trajectories of dönme communities, and questions of conversion and communal boundaries, which became more pressing in the late nineteenth- and twentieth-centuries. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/03/donme.html Cengiz Şişman is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Houtson, Clear Lake, where he works on the history of religions, conversion, irreligion, messianism, mysticism, crypto-double identities, missionaries, and religion and modernity. He also teaches courses on world history, Islamic empires, and the modern Middle East. Matthew Ghazarian is a Ph.D. Candidate in Columbia University's Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, African Studies. His research focuses on the intersections of sectarianism, humanitarianism, and political economy in central and eastern Anatolia between 1856 and 1893. CREDITS Episode No. 308 Release Date: 26 March 2017 Recording Location: Koç University Research Center for Anatolian Civizations, Istanbul, Turkey Audio editing by Matthew Ghazarian Music: Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep Images and bibliography courtesy of Cengiz Şişman available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/03/donme.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 53 Minutes 22 Mar 2017

E307 | Le mouvement des Jeunes Turcs et la Révolution de 1908 bouleversent profondément le système multiethnique et multiconfessionnel de l’empire ottoman en établissant un nouveau cadre politique pour les identifications concernant l’ État et la Nation. Dans cet épisode, François Georgeon explore avec nous les origines et les principales transformations du mouvement Jeune Turc: qui sont ces révolutionnaires ? Sont-ils des libéraux ou des réactionnaires, et comment caractériser leur rapport au passé ottoman, aux institutions ottomanes et à la modernité ? Enfin, comment s’articulent les identités nationalistes et impérialistes qu’ils invoquent et quelles conséquences pour la notion du vivre ensemble au sein de l’empire Ottoman et dont la République Turque hérite ? http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/03/Les-Jeunes-Turcs.html François GEORGEON est directeur de recherche émérite au CNRS et membre titulaire du Centre d’Études Turques, Ottomanes, Balkaniques et Centrasiatiques (CETOBaC) de l'EHESS à Paris. Spécialiste de l'Empire Ottoman au XIXe et XXe siècles, il est l’auteur d’une biographie d’Abdülhamid II et de nombreux ouvrages sur les nationalismes ottomans et turcs. Aurélie PERRIER est docteur en histoire contemporaine du Moyen-Orient et de l'Afrique du Nord et membre du centre de Recherches Historiques à Paris. Ses centres d'intérêts principaux sont l'histoire sociale du Moyen-Orient, le Maghreb colonial, et le genre et la masculinité dans la Méditerranée du XIXe siècle. Andreas GUIDI est doctorant au CETOBaC/EHESS à Paris et à la Université Humboldt à Berlin. Son projet de thèse porte sur l'histoire social du passage de l'Empire Ottoman à l'occupation italienne à Rhodes au prisme des rapports entre générations au début du XXe siècle. Andreas est aussi l'éditeur du Podcast The Southeast Passage sur l'histoire de l'Europe du Sud-Est. CRÉDITS Episode N. 307 (Tout/MO N. 3) Date de rela: 23 Mars 2017 Lieu de l’enregistrement: Paris, France Montage et production par Chris Gratien Extraits sonores: Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/03/Les-Jeunes-Turcs.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 72 Minutes 13 Mar 2017

E306 | This episode examines new perspectives on the study of nationalism through a discussion of emerging themes in the history of Eastern Europe. We talk to two researchers about their ongoing projects concerning the history of nationalism in place that did not necessary fit the mold. Cristian Florea discusses the history of Bukovina, a borderland region that often found itself divided between multi-ethnic empires and during the 20th century, between emergent nation states. Malgorzata Kurjanska offers an introduction to her work on the historical sociology of Eastern Europe and her comparative study of civil society and elite competition multiple regions of former Congress Poland. In addition, we reflect on the value of studying the phenomenon of nationalism in "non-national" geographies and at the would-be margins of Europe. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/03/bukovina-poland.html Cristina Florea is a historian of East-Central Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries, currently working on a book on the contested province of Bukovina, entitled Land of Longing: Bukovina at the Crossroads of Empire. Cristina obtained her PhD in History from Princeton University and is currently a member of the Harvard Academy of Scholars. Malgorzata Kurjanska is a sociologist who studies how elites and their conflicts shape the representation of social alliances and cleavages within civil society. She received her PhD in Sociology from UC Berkeley and is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History and is currently an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. Maria Blackwood is a doctoral candidate at Harvard University working on the history of Central Asia.Her dissertation examines the establishment of Soviet power in Kazakhstan, looking in particular at the first generation of Kazakhs who joined the Communist Party. Bibliography available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/03/bukovina-poland.html Music: From Excavated Shellac - Franciszek Dukla Wiejska Banda – Nikto to nam; Maria Mordazova and M. Zelenova – Da zadumal malchik zhenitsya; Samuel Pilip, John Karliak, i ich Lemkiwska Orchestra – Lemkiwsky Sztayer, Taneć; Kolomyjka Buczaćka by Ukrainska Orchestra Michala Thomasa; Kozak-Trepak by Ukrainska Orchestra Pawla Humeniuka. . .

  Direct Link   Download 40 Minutes 10 Mar 2017

E305 | The destruction of Ottoman-era waqf institutions in the Balkans during the wars of the 1990s was extensive, from masjids and tekkes to bridges and libraries. A bibliographer at Harvard's Fine Arts Library, András Riedlmayer, traveled throughout the region to document this destruction during and after the wars. In this podcast, Riedlmayer describes his work on waqf institutions in the Balkans and his testimonies about the destruction of culture for international war tribunals over the last two decades. We discuss the fate of antiquities during wars and the ethical implications for historians, collectors and museums. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/03/balkan-waqf.html András Riedlmayer is the bibliographer in Islamic Arts and Architecture for the Agha Khan Program for Islamic Architecture at Harvard’s Fine Arts Library. He specializes in the history and culture of the Balkans, and documented the destruction of cultural heritage in Bosnia and Kosovo during the wars of the 1990s. Shireen Hamza is a doctoral student in the History of Science department at Harvard University. Her research focuses broadly on the history of science and medicine in the Islamicate Middle Ages, and more specifically on the history of medicine and sexuality. Gwendolyn Collaço is a Ph.D. candidate at Harvard University's joint program for History of Art and Architecture and Middle Eastern Studies. She specializes in Ottoman painting and social history. Her dissertation analyzes costume albums produced by bazaar artists and their translations into European turquerie across media. CREDITS Episode No. 305 Release Date: 10 March 2017 Recording Location: Harvard University Audio editing by Shireen Hamza Music: Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Ben Yemenimi Al Isterim - Hafiz Burhan; Nazmiye - Rizeli Sadik Special thanks to Kara Güneş for permission to use the composition "Istanbul" Images and bibliography courtesy of with András Riedlmayer available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/03/balkan-waqf.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 50 Minutes 09 Mar 2017

E304 | For much of the early modern period, the Crimean Khanate was the staunch ally of the Ottoman state in its rivalry with the growing Russian Empire. In this regard, Crimea's annexation by Russia in 1783 represented an major historical departure. But as our guest in this episode, Kelly O'Neill, explains, the early period of Crimea's incorporation into the Russian Empire was characterized by continuities as well as ruptures. In this conversation, we explore the subjects of Islamic law and endowments in Crimea under Russian rule and issues of political identity, as well as the history of the Black Sea slave trade and O'Neill's historical GIS project about the Russian Empire called "Imperiia: Mapping the Russian Empire." More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/03/russian-crimea.html Kelly O'Neill is Associate Professor of History at Harvard University. Her forthcoming monograph entitled “Southern Empire: the Logic and Limits of Russian Rule in Crimea” explores the history of Russian rule in Crimea during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History and is currently an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. Erin Hutchinson is a PhD candidate in History at Harvard University focusing on the social and cultural history of the Soviet Union after the death of Stalin. Her dissertation project explores how intellectuals of rural origins, especially those from Moldova, Russia, Ukraine, and Armenia, sought to transform cultural understandings of the nation in the second half of the twentieth century. CREDITS Episode No. 304 Release Date: 9 March 2017 Recording Location: Harvard University Audio editing by Chris Gratien Music: Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Special thanks to Kara Güneş for permission to use the composition "Istanbul". . .

  Direct Link   Download 52 Minutes 04 Mar 2017

E303 | Although the Alawi communities of Syria have played an important role in the politics of the 20th century, the longer history of these communities has often been obscured by generalizations and discourses of mystification. In this episode, we talk to Stefan Winter about the history of the Alawis over the centuries, which is the subject of his new book A History of the ‘Alawis: From Medieval Aleppo to the Turkish Republic. In particular, we focus on the ways in which Syrian Alawis were incorporated into the Ottoman Empire and experienced changes in Ottoman politics and governance. We also examine the social and economic history of the Alawis during the early modern period and the encounter with modernity. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/03/alawis.html Stefan Winter (PhD, University of Chicago, 2002) is associate professor of history at the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQÀM). His work focuses mainly on Ottoman government and tribal society in the provinces of Tripoli, Aleppo and Raqqa in the early modern period. He has been invited professor at the EPHE and the EHESS in Paris, and was associate researcher at Bilkent University in 2014-2015. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History and is currently an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. CREDITS Episode No. 303 Release Date: 4 March 2017 Recording Location: Boston, MA Audio editing by Chris Gratien Music: from archive.org - Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla Special thanks to Kara Güneş for permission to use the composition "Istanbul" in the outro Images and bibliography courtesy of Stefan Winter available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/03/alawis.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 36 Minutes 02 Mar 2017

E302 | Depuis la fin de la guerre d’indépendance, la question des harkis agite les consciences en France comme en Algérie. Pierre Daum, journaliste au Monde Diplomatique et auteur du livre Le dernier tabou : les « harkis » restés en Algérie après l’indépendance, est parti à la rencontre de ces supplétifs de l’armée française et de leurs descendants. Dans cet épisode, il explore avec nous les non-dits et tabous qui entourent cette question : qui sont ces plus de 400,000 Algériens, qui à un moment ou un autre entre 1954 et 1962, se sont engagés aux côtés de la France? Quelles étaient leurs motivations, et quel fut leur sort suite à l’indépendance de 1962? Au fil de la discussion, Pierre Daum bat en brèche un certain nombre d’idées reçues sur les harkis et explore leur signification dans l’imaginaire français et algérien. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/03/harkis.html Pierre DAUM est un journaliste et écrivain français, auteur d’enquêtes sur le passé colonial de la France. Il collabore régulièrement pour le Monde Diplomatique. Dorothée Myriam KELLOU est une journaliste et réalisatrice basée à Paris. Elle est diplômée du master d'études arabes de l'Université de Georgetown à Washington D.C. et développe actuellement un projet de film sur les regroupements de populations pendant la guerre d'Algérie, prenant pour point de départ la mémoire/l'oubli de son père. Aurélie PERRIER est docteur en histoire contemporaine du Moyen-Orient et de l'Afrique du Nord et membre du centre de Recherches Historiques à Paris. Ses centres d'intérêts principaux sont l'histoire sociale du Moyen-Orient, le Maghreb colonial, et le genre et la masculinité dans la Méditerranée du XIXe siècle. Crédits Episode N. 302 (Tout/MO N. 2) Date de rela: 2 Mars 2017 Lieu de l’enregistrement: Paris, France Montage et production par Chris Gratien Extraits sonores: en Excavated Shellac - Lili Labassi - Mazal Haye Mazal; en archive.org - Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Monsieur Doumani - "The System/Το σύστημαν"; Kara Güneş -nbsp;"Istanbul" Bibliographie fournies par Pierre Daum http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/03/harkis.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 35 Minutes 21 Feb 2017

E301 | In the mid-nineteenth century Ottoman/Qajar borderlands (today’s Turco-Iranian border), East Syrian Christians had their first encounters with American Protestant missionaries. These encounters brought to the region new institutions like printing presses and American-style schools. They also helped remap Neo-Aramaic concepts for communal belonging like melat and tayepa – which loosely correspond with the Ottoman and Arabic terms millet and taife, what today we might translate as “nation” and “sect.” An older generation of scholars characterizes the missionary project as one of enlightenment or modernity, while others describe it as a form of colonialism. In this interview with Professor Adam Becker, we discuss approaches to studying changing notions of piety as well as different ways of thinking about the missionary encounter. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/01/becker.html Adam H. Becker (Princeton Ph. D. 2004) is Professor of Classics and Religious Studies at New York University. His research interests include Christian martyrdom in the Sasanian Empire, Jewish-Christian relations in Late Antiquity, the social and intellectual history of the Syriac (Christian Aramaic) tradition, and the missionary encounter in the nineteenth century. Matthew Ghazarian is a Ph.D. Candidate in Columbia University's Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, African Studies. His research focuses on the intersections of sectarianism, humanitarianism, and political economy in central and eastern Anatolia between 1856 and 1893. CREDITS Episode No. 301 Release Date: 21 February 2017 Recording Location: New York University Audio editing by Matthew Ghazarian and Chris Gratien Music: Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep Images and bibliography courtesy of Adam Becker available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/02/becker.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 48 Minutes 17 Feb 2017

E300 | Did the Ottoman Empire "decline" after an initial golden age of rapid expansion and military conquest? This question has long haunted the telling of Ottoman history. Critics note that describing centuries of Ottoman history simply as "decline" makes it seem inevitable that the Empire would be defeated in World War I, emptying the story of the contingency and nuance it deserves. How else might we describe the nature of political, economic, and cultural change in the later centuries of the Ottoman Empire? What other questions could we ask? In this episode, Baki Tezcan describes the period he calls the "Second Ottoman Empire," between roughly 1580 and 1826, not as a period of decline but as one of political transformation. His story radically remakes existing narratives about the nature and history of Ottoman political authority and governance and offers an important alternative to the "decline thesis" that has haunted Ottoman history for so long. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/02/rethinking-decline.html Baki Tezcan is Associate Professor of History at the University of California, Davis. He is the author of The Second Ottoman Empire: Political and Social Transformation in the Early Modern World (Cambridge University Press, 2010) and tens of articles and books chapters, and the co-editor of four festschrift collections. His next book is tentatively titled A Populist Reformation: Islam in the Second Ottoman Empire. Susanna Ferguson is a Ph.D. Candidate in Middle Eastern History at Columbia University. She is currently working on a dissertation entitled "Tracing Tarbiya: Women, Gender and Childrearing in Egypt and Lebanon, 1865-1939." CREDITS Episode No. 300 Release Date: 17 February 2017 Recording Location: University of California, Davis Audio editing by Chris Gratien Music: Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Special thanks to Kara Güneş for permission to use the composition "Istanbul" Bibliography courtesy of Baki Tezcan available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/02/rethinking-decline.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 51 Minutes 14 Feb 2017

E299 | In this episode, we approach the religious architecture of the Alevis, to examine how practice shapes architectural space and how socioeconomic change transforms such spaces. Many of our episodes on Ottoman History Podcast have focused on how monumental architecture, such as mosques and other buildings of religious significance, are tied to political transformation and expressions of political power and ideology. Taking a different perspective, our guest, Angela Andersen, researches the history and development of Alevi architectural forms in Turkey and abroad. Historically, Alevi religious practice and cem ceremonies took place in homes and other multi-purpose buildings, which could be configured as ad hoc meeting places for local communities during the communal cem ceremony. But with Alevi urban migration to cities in Turkey, Germany, and elsewhere, the creation of a "permanent address" for Alevis has emerged in the form of community centers providing a number of services, including designated rooms or halls for the cem. In this episode, we trace the genealogy of the modern cemevi to older contexts of Alevi religious practice and consider the role played by the cemevi in Turkey's new political landscape. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/02/alevi-architecture.html Angela Andersen focuses on the inter- and intra-religious interactions that take place via architecture in the Islamic world, in both the historical and contemporary contexts. Her current research engages the role and meaning of architecture for the Alevi minority, and the diversity of Islamic spaces for worship and practice. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History and is currently an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. Shireen Hamza is a doctoral student in the History of Science department at Harvard University. Her research focuses broadly on the history of science and medicine in the Islamicate Middle Ages, and more specifically on the history of women's health. CREDITS Episode No. 299 Release Date: 14 February 2017 Recording Location: Harvard University Audio editing by Chris Gratien Music: from archive.org - Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla; Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep Vinyl recording of "Hazin Hazin Ağlar Gönül" by Ali Ekber Çiçek digitized by Chris Gratien Special thanks to Kara Güneş for permission to use the composition "Istanbul" Images and bibliography courtesy of Angela Andersen available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/02/alevi-architecture.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 33 Minutes 12 Feb 2017

E298 | A handful of obscure archival fragments from Sultan Abdülhamid II’s imperial library in Yıldız have revealed a curious architectural practice that took place in the urban gardens of members and officials of the Ottoman court: they had a penchant for imported chalets. In this episode, Deniz Türker discusses her research on how this relatively niche fad for importation quickly shifted to widespread local prefabrication in the last decades of the nineteenth century. With the entrepreneurial oversight of production facilities in Istanbul, a larger swath of the capital’s population began to find ways to express their domestic tastes in an extremely competitive spirit on Istanbul’s expanding suburbs. In tracing these practices through state archives, newspapers, novel, and photographs, Türker also proposes some preliminary answers to the scarcity of original architectural drawings in the Ottoman archives. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/02/turker.html Deniz Türker is the Fari Sayeed Fellow in Islamic Art at Pembroke College, University of Cambridge. She has received her PhD in History of Art and Middle Eastern Studies from Harvard University, where she completed a dissertation on Yıldız, the Ottoman Empire’s last palace. Her current research follows two separate threads, one is to understand the patronage and public role of the Queen Mothers of the Tanzimat, and the other is to trace the life and work of two prolific imperial photographers, Kevork Abdullah, and Bahaeddin Bediz. Taylan Güngör is a doctoral candidate at SOAS in London. His interests are in Medieval and Pre-Modern Eastern Mediterranean trading circles and his research is on trade in Istanbul after 1453. CREDITS Episode No. 298 Release Date: 12 February 2017 Recording Location: SOAS, London Recorded at SOAS Radio studios. SOAS Radio is an outlet for creative media and talent housed by the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. Run by alumni, current students and staff at the School, including volunteers from like-minded communities, SOAS Radio is dedicated to varied and original programming on world music, culture and current affairs. Audio editing by Taylan Güngör Music: Muzaffer Akgun - Ha Bu Diyar Images and bibliography courtesy of Deniz Türker. . .

  Direct Link   Download 48 Minutes 10 Feb 2017

E297 | The preeminent position of manuscript painting and poetry at the Ottoman court has been well established by historians, yet the equally important practice of commissioning and collecting sumptuously decorated copies of the Qur’an--the sacred text of Islam--has been less explored. The role of the Qur’an in the artistic culture of the Ottoman world is just one facet of the landmark exhibition The Art of the Qur’an: Treasures from the Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts, on display at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC. The show traces the formal evolution of the Qur’an, especially in terms of calligraphy and manuscript illumination, with over 60 manuscripts and folios spanning a thousand years and created in an area stretching from Egypt to Afghanistan. Besides having an opportunity to appreciate the level of labor and skill invested in producing such high-quality manuscripts, visitors will also be surprised to learn about the mobility of these books, as they were avidly collected, repaired, and donated by members of the Ottoman court to various religious institutions around the empire. In this episode, curators Massumeh Farhad and Simon Rettig sit down with us to reflect both on the reception of the exhibition in the United States, as well as the process of organizing this collaborative venture between the Smithsonian and the Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts in Istanbul. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/02/quran-art-history.html Massumeh Farhad is Chief Curator and Curator of Islamic Art at the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery. She is a specialist in the arts of the book from sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Iran, and has curated numerous exhibitions on the arts of the Islamic world at the Freer and Sackler, including Falnama: The Book of Omens (2009-10), and Roads of Arabia: History and Archaeology of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (2012). Simon Rettig is Assistant Curator of Islamic art at the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery. He previously worked at the French Institute of Anatolian Studies in Istanbul and the Freie Üniversität in Berlin. Rettig curated the 2014 exhibition Nasta‘liq: The Genius of Persian Calligraphy at the Freer and Sackler. Emily Neumeier is ACLS Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities at The Ohio State University and recently earned her Ph.D. from University of Pennsylvania. Her research concerns the art and architecture of the Ottoman Empire and Turkish Republic. She is co-curator of our series on The Visual Past and editor of the blog stambouline, a site where travel and the Ottoman world meet. CREDITS Episode No. 297 Release Date: 10 February 2017 Recording Location: Freer & Sackler Galleries, DC Audio editing by Chris Gratien Music: Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla Special thanks to Kara Güneş for permission to use the composition "Istanbul" Images and bibliography courtesy of Massumeh Farhad and Simon Rettig available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/02/quran-art-history.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 40 Minutes 08 Feb 2017

E296 | In French Algeria, the colonial imperatives of assimilation and difference gave birth to legal pluralism. In this episode, Dr. Sarah Ghabrial explains what it meant for Algerian women to have different legal structures operating at the same time. The ability to argue one's case in an Islamic court and also appeal it in French common law provided openings for women in matters of personal status. But it also had limits. They may have ultimately been able to divorce their husbands, but divorcing themselves from patriarchal structures of power proved more difficult, if not impossible. At the same time as legal codes changed, so, too, did medicine. As in much of the world, a state-sponsored scientific medicine, mostly practiced by men, began to crowd out local healing practices and knowledge of bodies, in many cases performed and possessed by women such as midwives. But it would have a particularly racialized impact in French Algeria. We also examine the impact of this change in court, where the latter form of medicine came to be an arbiter of truth, particularly in divorce cases. We close by shifting from matters of impotence to questions of agency, and how useful of a concept it is for this history. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/02/ghabrial.html Sarah Ghabrial is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Department of History at Columbia University. Her current book project, Colonial Law and the Muslim Family in Algeria (1870-1930), uses social and gender history approaches and untapped judicial archives to examine the French governance of Islamic law in colonial Algeria. Her article, "The Traumas and Truths of the Body: Medical Evidence and Divorce in Colonial Algerian Courts” Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies (November 2015) won the 2014 JMEWS Graduate Student Paper Prize. Edna Bonhomme is a doctoral candidate in History of Science at Princeton University. Her dissertation focuses on the history of the bubonic plague in Cairo and Tunis during the outbreaks in the 1780s and 1790s. She graduated from Reed College in 2006 with a degree in Biology and from Columbia University with a master's in public health. Prior to pursuing history, she was a research assistant at the Oregon Health and Sciences University. In addition to academic work, she occasionally writes for Socialist Worker and Red Wedge Magazine. Sam Dolbee is a PhD student completing his dissertation on the environmental history of the late-Ottoman and mandate-era Jazira region at New York University in the joint program in history and Middle Eastern and Islamic studies. CREDITS Episode No. 296 Release Date: 7 February 2017 Recording Location: New York, NY Audio editing by Chris Gratien Music: from Excavated Shellac - Lili Labassi - Mazal Haye Mazal; Hocine Slaoui – Yal Cahlafrom archive.org - Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer Special thanks to Kara Güneş for permission to use the composition "Istanbul" Images and bibliography courtesy of Sarah Ghabrial available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/02/ghabrial.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 40 Minutes 23 Jan 2017

E295 | We often assume that as we become increasingly connected to ever larger networks of information and news we become part of larger and more cohesive polities. In this episode, Arthur Asseraf discusses how the introduction of new networks of communication in colonial Algeria generated friction and unevenness instead of expansive flows. Looking at telegraphs, newspapers, cinemas and more we discuss not only the types of intermediaries that flourished in this new environment, but also how news led to new and imagined forms of Muslim belonging in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. From a discussion of telegrams and coffee shops we jump into discussions of pan-Islamism, colonial conspiracy theories, and the nature of polities. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/01/ColonialNews.html Arthur Asseraf is currently Examination Fellow in History at All Souls College, Oxford and from 2017 will be University Lecturer in the History of France and the Francophone World since c.1800 at the University of Cambridge. His research focuses on the history of information in the modern Mediterranean and on the colonial and post-colonial history of France and North Africa. Nir Shafir is a historian of the Middle East whose research examines the intersections of knowledge production, religious practice, and material culture in the early modern world (1400-1800). He curates Ottoman History Podcast’s series on history of science in addition to being one of the co-founders of hazine.info, a website that explores the archives and libraries of the Islamic world. He is currently assistant professor of history at UCSD. CREDITS Episode No. 295 Release Date: 23 January 2017 Recording Location: Rethymno, Greece Audio editing by Shireen Hamza Music: from Excavated Shellac - Lili Labassi - Mazal Haye Mazal; from archive.org - Egil Daglar Ustunden Asam - Viktoriya Hanim Special thanks to Kara Güneş for permission to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro and to Monsieur Doumani for allowing us to use "The System/Το σύστημαν" in the outro Images and bibliography courtesy of Arthur Asseraf available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/01/ColonialNews.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 47 Minutes 19 Jan 2017

E294 | In this episode, Christine Philliou traces the story of Istanbul's Phanariots, a group of wealthy, "Greek-identified" families who rose to play a central role in Ottoman foreign policy and diplomacy in the 17th and 18th centuries. What happened to these families in the tumultuous years preceding and following Greek independence from the Ottoman Empire in 1832? In this episode, we explore the biography of Phanariot Stephanos Vogorides and ask what his story has to offer Ottoman history. His story and that of the Phanariots shed light on Ottoman governance and diplomacy, as well as relations between Muslims, Christians, Ottomans, and Greeks in the important but often-overlooked moment just prior to the 19th century reforms known as the Tanzimat. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/01/ottoman-and-greek.html Christine Philliou is Associate Professor of History at the University of California, Berkeley. She specializes in the political and social history of the Ottoman Empire and modern Turkey and Greece, and is the author of Biography of an Empire : Governing Ottomans in an Age of Revolution (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2011). Susanna Ferguson is a Ph.D. Candidate in Middle Eastern History at Columbia University. She is currently working on a dissertation entitled "Tracing Tarbiya: Women, Gender and Childrearing in Egypt and Lebanon, 1865-1939." Zoe Griffith is a doctoral candidate in History at Brown University working on political economy and governance in Egypt and the Ottoman Mediterranean. Zoe is a co-curator of the OHP series on legal history in the Ottoman Empire and Islamic world. Credits Episode No. 294 Release Date: 18 January 2017 Recording Location: University of California, Davis Audio editing by Chris Gratien Music: archive.org - Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Special thanks to Muhtelif for the use of "Ta Paidia & Lamma Bada" Bibliography courtesy of Christine Philliou available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/01/ottoman-and-greek.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 41 Minutes 15 Jan 2017

E293 | The Opium Wars and the massive trade in opium between South Asia and China over the nineteenth century made famous the role of opium within the history of colonialism and globalization. But it is less well known that in the early twentieth century, the Republic of Turkey became the largest exporter of opium in the world. In this episode we speak with Daniel-Joseph Macarthur-Seal about how and why opium became an export commodity in Turkey and how Turkish citizens smuggled the substance out once it became formally illegal. Along the way we gain a glimpse into the economic history of the young republic, the legal life of its citizens abroad, and how these smuggling operations built new forms of cosmopolitanism from the ground up as the Turkish republic became less and less accommodating for non-Muslims. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/01/opium.html Daniel-Joseph Macarthur-Seal is a research fellow at the British Institute At Ankara and an affiliated post-doc at Middle East Technical University working on smuggling in the inter-war eastern Mediterranean. He was awarded his PhD at Cambridge University in 2014 for his thesis on the British/Allied occupations of Thessaloniki, Alexandria, and Istanbul during and immediately after the First World War, which he is now revising for publication. Nir Shafir is a historian of the Middle East whose research examines the intersections of knowledge production, religious practice, and material culture in the early modern world (1400-1800). He curates Ottoman History Podcast’s series on history of science in addition to being one of the co-founders of hazine.info, a website that explores the archives and libraries of the Islamic world. He is currently an assistant professor of history at UCSD. Credits Episode No. 293 Release Date: 14 January 2017 Recording Location: Rethymno, Greece Audio editing by Chris Gratien Music: from archive.org - Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla Special thanks to Kara Güneş for permission to use the composition "Istanbul" Additional segments: "Smoking Shoes" by Sam Dolbee Images and bibliography courtesy of Daniel-Joseph Macarthur-Seal available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/01/opium.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 16 Minutes 13 Jan 2017

Michael Talbot offers a short history of a late Ottoman goodwill mission to Japan followed by commentary by Cemil Aydin Recorded by Michael Talbot in Yokohama, Japan. . .

  Direct Link   Download 41 Minutes 11 Jan 2017

E292 | Ottoman History Podcast'in bu bölümünde, Özge Samancı ile Osmanlı’da saray, elit mutfağı ve sokak yemek kültürü üzerine bir sohbet gerçekleştirdik. Osmanlı saray mutfaklarında çalışanlar arasında nasıl bir işbölümü olduğuna ve mutfağın mekansal düzenine değindik. Alaturka ve alafranga mutfak kültüründe, yemek ve içecek olarak tüketilen ürünleri ve nasıl tüketildiklerinin yanı sıra tüketim alışkanlıklarının kültürel ve toplumsal boyutunu da ele almaya çalıştık. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/01/osmanli-yemek.html Araştırma alanları Osmanlı ve Türk mutfak kültür ve tarihi olan Doç. Dr. Özge Samancı 1995 yılında Boğaziçi Üniversitesi Tarih Bölümü lisans programından, 1998 yılında aynı üniversitesinin Tarih Yüksek lisans programından mezun olmuştur. 2009’da yılında Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS-Paris)’te tarih ve medeniyetler alanında doktora derecesini alan Samancı Yeditepe Üniversitesi Gastronomi ve Mutfak Sanatları Bölümü öğretim üyesidir. Food & History ve Yemek ve Kültür dergilerinin yayın kurulu üyesidir. Ufuk Adak, İstanbul Kemerburgaz Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Bölümü öğretim üyesidir. Adak, University of Cincinnati'den Tarih doktorası aldı. Doktora tezi, son dönem Osmanlı İmparatorluğu'nda doğu Akdeniz liman kentlerindeki sosyal ve politik dönüşümü, suç, ceza, sosyal kontrol ve hapishaneler üzerinden ele almaktadır. Adak, Berlin'de Zentrum Moderner Orient'te (ZMO) doktora sonrası araştırmalarda bulunmuştur. Doktorasını 2015 yılında Binghamton Üniversitesi, Tarih Bölümü'nde tamamlayan Nurçin İleri, Boğaziçi Arşiv ve Dokümantasyon Merkezi’nde koordinatör yardımcısı. Çalışmalarında, XIX. Yüzyıl Osmanlı ve Erken Cumhuriyet dönemi liman kentlerinde yaşanan toplumsal ve kültürel dönüşümleri, sosyal tarih, teknoloji tarihi, duyuların tarihi ve toplumsal cinsiyet tartışmaları ekseninde ele almaktadır. Yapım ve Yayın 292. Bölüm Yayın Tarihi: 11 Ocak 2017 Kayıt Yeri: ANAMED, İstanbul Ses editörü: Onur Engin Müzik: archive.org - Müzeyyen Senar - Ölürsem Yazıktır Sana Kanmadan Görseller ve kaynakça Özge Samancı müsaadesiyle http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/01/osmanli-yemek.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 46 Minutes 08 Jan 2017

E291 | A tale of mutual ignorance between psychoanalysis and Islam has obscured the many creative and co-constitutive encounters between these two traditions of thought, both so prominent in the 20th century. This presumed incommensurability has hardened the lines between the "modern subject," assumed to be secular and Western, and its Others, often associated with Islam or with the East. In this episode on her forthcoming book, The Arabic Freud, Dr. Omnia El Shakry asks what it might mean to think psychoanalysis and Islam together as a "creative encounter of ethical engagement." She shows how psychoanalysts and thinkers in Egypt after World War II drew on Freud and Horney alongside Ibn 'Arabi and Abu Bakr al-Razi to explore the nature of the modern subject, the role of the unconscious, and the gendered process of ethical attunement. In so doing, she suggests that Arabic psychoanalytic texts were neither epiphenomenal to politics nor simply political allegory for nationalism or decolonization; rather, we have ethical and historiographical responsibilities to read these texts and others like them as something more than a product of their time. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/01/arabic-freud.html Omnia El Shakry is Associate Professor of History at the University of California, Davis. She is the author of The Great Social Laboratory: Subjects of Knowledge in Colonial and Postcolonial Egypt (Stanford UP, 2007) and The Arabic Freud: Psychoanalysis and Islam in Modern Egypt (Princeton UP, 2017, forthcoming), as well as editor of the multi-volume Gender and Sexuality in Islam (Routledge, 2016). Susanna Ferguson is a Ph.D. Candidate in Middle Eastern History at Columbia University. She is currently working on a dissertation entitled "Tracing Tarbiya: Women, Gender and Childrearing in Egypt and Lebanon, 1865-1939." Credits Episode No. 291 Release Date: 8 January 2017 Recording Location: University of California, Davis Audio editing by Chris Gratien Music: from archive.org - Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; from Excavated Shellac - Munira al-Mahdiyya – Aldahre Kataâ Awsali Special thanks to Kara Güneş for permission to use the composition "Istanbul" in the outro. Bibliography available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/01/arabic-freud.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 71 Minutes 05 Jan 2017

E290 | National language politics and the transformation of literacy have effected major changes in both spoken and written language over the course of the last century, but few languages have changed as dramatically as modern Turkish. The reform of the language from the 1920s onward, which not only replaced the Ottoman alphabet with a new Latin-based alphabet but also led to a radical transformation of the lexicon and grammar, has been described by Geoffrey Lewis as "catastrophic success" due to the extreme but unquestionably successful nature of this attempt to revolutionize language in Turkey. In this episode, we talk to Emmanuel Szurek about his research on the politics of the alphabet change, the language reforms, and the surname laws of the early Republican period. Our extended interview is followed by a brief conversation in French about the history of French Turcology. CREDITS Episode No. 290 Release Date: 4 January 2017 Recording Location: Paris, France Audio editing by Chris Gratien Music: from archive.org - Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla; Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Special thanks to Erik Bullot for the "Alphabet March." This march was composed by Osman Zeki (Üngör) in Fall 1928 as a homage and incitement for the Romanization campaign. The partition was found by the cinematographer Erik Bullot and his team while preparing his film 'La révolution de l'alphabet' (Capricci 2014). For this recording (Ankara, September 2013), the conductor was Tuncay Doğu, while Kaan Yüksel was at the piano and the choir was composed of students from the Music Department of ODTÜ Üniversitesi. The sound recording was made by Jean-François Priester. Additional segments: "Talvasa" read by Seçil Yılmaz; "" with Aurelie Perrier and Emmanuel Szurek Images and bibliography courtesy of Emmanuel Szurek available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2017/01/turkish-language-reform.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 43 Minutes 18 Dec 2016

E289 | What terms and ideas were considered erotic in early modern Ottoman literature, and what can studying them tell us about later historical periods and our own conceptions of the beauty, love, and desire? In this episode, we welcome İrvin Cemil Schick back to the podcast to discuss a project he is compiling with İpek Hüner-Cora and Helga Anetshofer: a dictionary called the "Erotic Vocabulary of Ottoman Literature." More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/12/irvin-cemil-schick.html İrvin Cemil Schick holds a PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and has taught inter alia at Harvard University, MIT, and İstanbul Şehir University. He is the author of The Erotic Margin: Sexuality and Spatiality in Alteritist Discourse (1999), The Fair Circassian: Adventures of an Orientalist Motif (in Turkish, 2004), and Writing the Body, Society, and the Universe: On Islam, Gender, and Culture (in Turkish, 2011). His current research interests include the Islamic arts of the book; gender, sexuality, and the body in Islam; and animals and the environment in Islam. Susanna Ferguson is a Ph.D. Candidate in Middle Eastern History at Columbia University. She is currently working on a dissertation entitled "Tracing Tarbiya: Women, Gender and Childrearing in Egypt and Lebanon, 1865-1939." Matthew Ghazarian is a Ph.D. student in Columbia University's Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, African Studies. His research focuses on the intersections of sectarianism, humanitarianism, and political economy in central and eastern Anatolia between 1856 and 1893. CREDITS Episode No. 289 Release Date: 18 December 2016 Recording Location: Istanbul Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: from archive.org - Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Images and bibliography courtesy of İrvin Cemil Schick available athttp://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/12/irvin-cemil-schick.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 39 Minutes 11 Dec 2016

E288 | The political, social, and cultural roots of the modern Middle East stretch into the early modern period of Ottoman and Safavid rule and even beyond. So how should we narrate the long making of the Middle East within the context of an ever-changing present? In this episode, we talk to Betty Anderson about the perspectives and practices that inform her new textbook A History of the Modern Middle East: Rulers, Rebels, and Rogues. We consider ways of organizing and thematically arranging the history of a diverse region over hundreds of years, we discuss the importance of bringing previously silenced actors and groups into the historiography, and we reflect on how the past decades of historiography as well as recent events have changed how we conceptualize prevailing narrative of Middle East history. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/12/modern-middle-east.html Betty Anderson is author of Nationalist Voices in Jordan: The Street and the State, The American University of Beirut: Arab Nationalism and Liberal Education, and A History of the Modern Middle East: Rulers, Rebels, and Rogues. Her current project examines the economic, educational, political and social changes that have come to Beirut, Amman, and Ramallah over the last 25 years. At Boston University, she is director of the Institute for the Study of Muslim Societies and Civilizations. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History and is currently an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. CREDITS Episode No. 288 Release Date: 11 December 2016 Recording Location: Belmont, MA Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: from archive.org - Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; from Excavated Shellac - Munira al-Mahdiyya – Aldahre Kataâ Awsali Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro and outro music Bibliography courtesy of Betty Anderson available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/12/modern-middle-east.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 50 Minutes 07 Dec 2016

E287 | Pre-Saharan Morocco is a transitional space between the Atlas Mountains in the north and the Sahara in the south, and the oases of pre-Saharan Morocco have long been marked by local autonomy, diversity, and particularities of agriculture, property ownership, class, and race. In this episode, we talk to Karen Rignall about her research on land, labor, and social life in a Moroccan oasis and discuss socioeconomic change in rural morocco through the lens of agricultural production in the transitional environments and political economies of the pre-Sahara. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/12/rignall.html Karen Rignall is assistant professor in the Community and Leadership Development Department of the University of Kentucky’s College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. A cultural anthropologist by training, her work addresses land rights, the practice of farming, and the governance of social life. She is currently completing a book manuscript provisionally entitled “An Elusive Common: Land, Labor and Belonging in a Moroccan Oasis.” Graham H. Cornwell is a Ph.D. Candidate in History at Georgetown University. His work examines the history of tea and sugar consumption in Northwest Africa in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. He is also the editor of tajine, a podcast and blog about North African Studies. CREDITS Episode No. 287 Release Date: 7 December 2016 Recording Location: University of Kentucky Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: from archive.org Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; from Excavated Shellac - Hocine Slaoui – Yal Cahla; Lili Labassi - Mazal Haye Mazal Images and bibliography courtesy of Karen Rignall available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/12/rignall.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 58 Minutes 04 Dec 2016

E286 | During the late 19th century, Louis Pasteur and his disciples promoted a laboratory-based study of disease and contagion that led to what many call "the bacteriological turn" and reshaped public health in France and beyond. In this episode, we sit down with doctor, philosopher, and historian Anne-Marie Moulin to talk about the history of the Pastorians and the early establishment of Pasteur Institutes in the Ottoman Empire and North Africa. We explore the role of the Ottoman Empire in the creation of the Pasteur Institutes and their global network, and we consider the relationship between medicine and religion, politics, and colonialism in North Africa and the Middle East. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/12/pasteur.html Anne-Marie Moulin is a doctor with decades of experience in the fields of medicine and public health and emeritus director of research at CNRS in Paris. In addition to her research in the fields of immunology and tropical medicine, she has published widely on the history of science and medicine in France, the Middle East, and North Africa. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History and is currently an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. CREDITS Episode No. 286 Release Date: 5 December 2016 Recording Location: Paris, France Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: from archive.org - Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; from Excavated Shellac - Lili Labassi - Mazal Haye Mazal Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro music Additional thanks to Seçil Yılmaz. . .

  Direct Link   Download 61 Minutes 03 Dec 2016

E285 | Famous images such as Amin al-Husayni's meeting with Hitler have come to dominate the public imagination of Arab-Nazi relations in Western societies. But to what extent does this imagery reflect actual trajectories of reception and reflection of fascist ideology in the Middle East or the experience that Arabs and Muslims of other origins had under Nazi rule? In this episode, we discuss the ideological options of interwar nationalists from the Arab world with Peter Wien, author of Iraqi Arab Nationalism: Authoritarian, Totalitarian, and Pro-Fascist Inclinations, 1932-1941 and Arab Nationalism: The Politics of History and Culture in the Modern Middle East (forthcoming). We examine the possible models adopted by political movements of the Arab world in their nation-state projects and struggles with British and French colonialism, and we explore the fates and resonance of ideologies such as fascism and communism in the Arab world. In doing so, we unearth the experiences of Arab nationalists in Nazi Germany, and we consider the relationship between European anti-Semitism and anti-Semitism in the modern Middle East. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/12/peter-wien.html Peter Wien is Associate Professor for Modern Middle Eastern History at the University of Maryland in College Park. He is the author of Iraqi Arab Nationalism: Authoritarian, Totalitarian and Pro-Fascist Inclinations, 1932-1941 (2006) and Arab Nationalism: The Politics of History and Culture in the Modern Middle East (2017). Graham H. Cornwell is a Ph.D. Candidate in History at Georgetown University. His work examines the history of tea and sugar consumption in Northwest Africa in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. He is also the editor of tajine, a podcast and blog about North African Studies. Alissa Walter is a Ph.D. candidate in Georgetown University's History Department. The title of her dissertation is "The Ba‘th Party in Baghdad: State-Society Relations through Wars, Sanctions, and Authoritarianism." CREDITS Episode No. 285 Release Date: 2 December 2016 Recording Location: Washington, DC Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: from archive.org - Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla; Turnalar Turnalar - Darulelhan Heyeti Special thanks to Monsieur Doumani for allowing us to use "The System/Το σύστημαν" Images and bibliography courtesy of Peter Wien available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/12/peter-wien.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 47 Minutes 29 Nov 2016

E284 | The history of Mediterranean islands offers a dynamic paradox of insularity engendered by geographical isolation and connectivity fostered by access to ports and maritime networks. In this podcast, we discuss those themes through a conversation about the transformation of Cyprus over the centuries of Ottoman imperial rule. Our guest Antonis Hadjicyriakou has studied the history of Cyprus from the earliest years of Ottoman rule during the late 16th century into the 19th century. In the interview, we explore agricultural production and political economy in Cyprus through geo-spatial analysis of early Ottoman documentation and consider how the local politics and economy of Cyprus were situated in a changing Mediterranean. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/11/ottoman-empire-cyprus.html Antonis Hadjikyriacou is Marie Curie Intra-European fellow at the Institute for Mediterranean Studies, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas. He earned his Ph.D. in History from SOAS, University of London, and he has previously worked and taught at Princeton University, SOAS, the University of Crete, and the University of Cyprus. Ηe is currently completing his monograph entitled "Insularity and Empire: Ottoman Cyprus in the Early Modern Mediterranean." Michael Talbot received his PhD from SOAS in 2013 for a thesis on Ottoman-British relations in the eighteenth century, and now lectures and researches on a range of topics in Ottoman history at the University of Greenwich in London. CREDITS Episode No. 284 Release Date: 29 November 2016 Recording Location: Rethymno, Greece Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: from archive.org - Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Special thanks to Monsieur Doumani for allowing us to use "The System/Το σύστημαν" Images and bibliography courtesy of Antonis Hadjikyriacou To learn more about the Mediterranean Insularities project, visit http://medins.ims.forth.gr/. . .

  Direct Link   Download 49 Minutes 25 Nov 2016

E283 | The epithet "abid," Arabic for "slave," still follows those with dark skin as they move around today's Cairo. The word and its negative connotations, however, have a long history. In this episode, Professor Eve Troutt Powell explores this history by tracing the many lives of slaves and slavery in late Ottoman Egypt. She draws on the narratives of Ottoman Egyptian elites, Sudanese slave traders, and slaves themselves to show how the practice of owning people with dark skin shaped a regional Ottoman-Egyptian-Sudanese economy, gendered patterns of elite household life, and prominent forms of textual and visual culture. She reads representations of slavery and slaves' lives in the late nineteenth century to show how practices of Egyptian and Sudanese slave trading and owning, developed far from the decks of Atlantic slavers, nevertheless produced their own forms of racist thinking that have persisted into the present in Egypt as elsewhere. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/11/eve-troutt-powell.html Eve M. Troutt Powell is the Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of History and Africana Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of A Different Shade of Colonialism: Egypt, Great Britain and the Mastery of the Sudan (University of California, 2003) and Tell This in My Memory: Stories of Enslavement in Egypt, Sudan and the Late Ottoman Empire (Stanford University Press, 2012). She was named a MacArthur Foundation Fellow in 2003. Susanna Ferguson is a Ph.D. Candidate in Middle Eastern History at Columbia University. She is currently working on a dissertation entitled "Tracing Tarbiya: Women, Gender and Childrearing in Egypt and Lebanon, 1865-1939." CREDITS Episode No. 283 Release Date: 25 November 2016 Recording Location: University of Pennsylvania Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: from archive.org - Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla; from freemusicarchive.org - Bumble Bee Bossa by Podington Bear Special thanks to Muhtelif for allowing us to use "Bint El Shalabiya" and to Kara Güneş for the composition "Istanbul" Bibliography available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/11/eve-troutt-powell.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 41 Minutes 16 Nov 2016

E282 | Classical encyclopedias and compendia such as Pliny’s Natural History have long been known to Western audiences, but the considerably more recent works of medieval Islamic scholars have been comparatively ignored. In this episode, we talk to Elias Muhanna about his new translation of a fourteenth-century Arabic compendium by Egyptian scholar Shihab al-Din al-Nuwayri, which covers everything from astrological and natural phenomena to religion, politics, food, animals, sex, and of course history. Al-Nuwayri’s compendium, entitled The Ultimate Ambition in the Arts of Erudition (Nihayat al-arab fi funun al-adab), is rare glimpse into not only the worldview of a 14th century scholar but also the centuries of texts and learning available to the literati of the Mamluk Empire and the medieval Islamicate world. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/11/medieval-islamic-encyclopedia.html Elias Muhanna is the Manning Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature at Brown University. He is a scholar of classical Arabic literature and Islamic intellectual history. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History and is currently an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. Zoe Griffith is a doctoral candidate in History at Brown University working on political economy and governance in Egypt and the Ottoman Mediterranean. Zoe is a co-curator of the OHP series on legal history in the Ottoman Empire and Islamic world. Nora Lessersohn is a Ph.D. student in History and Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard University. Her work focuses on Ottoman Armenians in Anatolia, Istanbul, and the United States during the 19th and 20th centuries. CREDITS Episode No. 282 Release Date: 16 November 2016 Recording Location: Brown University Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: from archive.org - Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro music Additional music recordings of Charbel Rouhana (oud) and Samir Siblini (nay), July 2003, courtesy of Elias Muhanna Bibliography courtesy of Elias Muhanna available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/11/medieval-islamic-encyclopedia.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 45 Minutes 11 Nov 2016

E281 | In the conventional telling of the intellectual history of the Ottoman Empire and the Islamicate world, there has been very little room for people outside the ranks of the learned scholars or ulema associated with the religious, intellectual, and political elite of Muslim communities. But in this episode, we explore the writings of Shihab al-Din Ahmad Ibn Budayr, an 18th-century Damascene barber, as well as a host of writers that our guest Dana Sajdi has described as representatives of "nouveau literacy" in the Ottoman Levant. We discuss how non-elite writers left records of the people and events they encountered during a period of socioeconomic transformation in Greater Syria, and we listen to readings from the text of Ibn Budayr--the barber of Damascus--that bring to life the literary style of the unusual and extraordinary authors who wrote from the margins of the learned establishment in early modern Ottoman society. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/11/barber-of-damascus.html Dana Sajdi is Associate Professor of Middle Eastern History at Boston College. In addition to authoring The Barber of Damascus: Nouveau Literacy in the 18th Century Levant, she is editor of Ottoman Tulips, Ottoman Coffee: Leisure and Lifestyle in the Eighteenth Century (I.B. Tauris, 2008; in Turkish, Koc University Press, 2014). Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History and is currently an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. Shireen Hamza is a doctoral student in the History of Science department at Harvard University. Her research focuses broadly on the history of science and medicine in the Islamicate Middle Ages, and more specifically on the history of women's health. CREDITS Episode No. 281 Release Date: 11 November 2016 Recording Location: Cambridge, MA Editing and production by Chris Gratien and Shireen Hamza Sound excerpts: from archive.org - Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla; from Excavated Shellac- Lili Labassi - Mazal Haye Mazal Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro and outro music and to Muhtelif for the use of "Ta Paidia & Lamma Bada" Image courtesy of Camille Alexandre Otrakji Bibliography courtesy of Dana Sajdi available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/11/barber-of-damascus.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 43 Minutes 08 Nov 2016

E280 | What happens when we encounter "Orientalist" aesthetics outside the West? In the late nineteenth century, a cosmopolitan group of Ottoman architects turned to modern forms of art history writing to argue that synthesis and change stood at the heart of a particularly "Ottoman" architectural aesthetic. Working together, these writers produced the first text of modern art history writing in the Ottoman empire, the Usul-ı Mi’marî-yi Osmanî or The Fundamentals of Ottoman Architecture. This volume was published simultaneously in Ottoman Turkish, French and German for the Universal Exposition or World's Fair in Vienna in 1873. In this episode, Ahmet Ersoy explores the making of this text, its arguments, and its implications for understanding the relationship of the late-Tanzimat Ottoman Empire with Europe, its own cosmopolitan "hyphenated-Ottoman" intellectuals, and historical imagination. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/11/architecture-historical-imagination.html Ahmet Ersoy is Associate Professor at the History Department at Boğaziçi University, Istanbul. His work deals with the history of the Late Ottoman Empire with a special focus on the changing role and status of visual culture during a period of westernizing change. He is the author of the book, Architecture and the Late Ottoman Historical Imaginary: Reconfiguring the Architectural Past in a Modernizing Empire, and he is currently pursuing research on the confluence of photography, new media technologies and print culture in the late Ottoman world. Susanna Ferguson is a Ph.D. Candidate in Middle Eastern History at Columbia University. She is currently working on a dissertation entitled "Tracing Tarbiya: Women, Gender and Childrearing in Egypt and Lebanon, 1865-1939." CREDITS Episode No. 280 Release Date: 8 November 2016 Recording Location: ANAMED, Istanbul Audio editing by Onur Engin Sound excerpts: from archive.org - Müzeyyen Senar - Gözlerin Bir İçim Su Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro music Images and bibliography courtesy of Ahmet Ersoy available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/11/architecture-historical-imagination.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 45 Minutes 05 Nov 2016

E279 | Between December 1991 and February 2002, Algeria experienced a protracted civil war, which earned the period the designation of the "dark decade." In this episode, we explore how Algerians experienced and coped with the violence and trepidation of the civil war through the lens of humor. Our guest Elizabeth Perego has studied to role of humor, jokes, and caricatures in the politics of Algeria since the struggle against French colonialism in the 1950s. In our conversation, we focus on the dark humor of the dark decade, retelling some of the most widespread jokes of the period in a discussion of how humor provided a source of relief and platform for commentary on the unsettling realities of the war. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/11/humor-war-algeria.html Elizabeth Perego is a Ph.D. candidate in History at the Ohio State University. She is completing a dissertation entitled "Laughing in the Face of Death" which analyzes the evolution of political humor in post-independence Algeria. Her broader research focuses on the intersection of culture, media, and conflict in the modern Maghrib. She has previously published scholarship in the Journal of North African Studies and Hawwa: Journal of Women of the Middle East and the Islamic World. Graham H. Cornwell is a Ph.D. Candidate in History at Georgetown University. His work examines the history of tea and sugar consumption in Northwest Africa in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. He is also the editor of tajine, a podcast and blog about North African Studies. Soha El Achi is completing a Ph.D. in the Department of History at Georgetown University. Her dissertation examines the history of French colonialism, slavery, and abolition in North Africa. CREDITS Episode No. 279 Release Date: 5 November 2016 Recording Location: Georgetown University Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: from archive.org - Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Egil Daglar Ustunden Asam - Viktoriya Hanim; from Excavated Shellac - Hocine Slaoui – Yal Cahla Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the outro music Image courtesy of Sofiane Zouggar Images and bibliography available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/11/humor-war-algeria.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 31 Minutes 03 Nov 2016

E278 | The French military struggle to maintain control over Algeria throughout the war period (1954-1962) is remembered for its violent and destructive impacts. But during the war, the French administration also sought to maintain control over Algeria by attempting to build the rural economy and deepening the structures of colonial rule in the countryside. In this episode, we talk to Muriam Haleh Davis about the Constantine Plan, a project of social and economic development carried out within the context of the Algerian War and the rise of Cold War developmentalism. In our conversion, we explore the understandings of race embedded in French development in Algeria and situate the context of the Algerian War within the broader history of decolonization, the rise of the social sciences, and the making of the European Community. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/11/development-race-algeria.html Muriam Haleh Davis is Assistant Professor of History at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is currently working on a manuscript that studies how the postwar reinvention of a market economy influenced prevailing ideas of race and national identity in Algeria. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History and is currently an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. Aurelie Perrier holds a Ph.D. in Middle East and North African history from Georgetown University and is a member of the Centre de Recherches Historiques in Paris. Her research interests include the social history of the Middle East, the colonial Maghreb and gender and masculinity in the 19th-century Mediterranean. CREDITS Episode No. 278 Release Date: 3 November 2016 Recording Location: Paris, France Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: from Excavated Shellac- Lili Labassi - Mazal Haye Mazal; from archive.org - Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; from freemusicarchive.org - Bumble Bee Bossa by Podington Bear Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the outro music Images and bibliography courtesy of Muriam Haleh Davis available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/11/development-race-algeria.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 42 Minutes 31 Oct 2016

E277 | The Algerian War is perhaps the most recognizable national and anti-colonial movement of the 20th century. From the iconic film “The Battle of Algiers” to Frantz Fanon's influential book The Wretched of the Earth, the violence of the Algerian fight for independence and the French reaction has marked depictions of not only the war but representations of Algerian history on the whole. In this podcast, however, we explore another battlefield of contention during the Algerian War: medicine and humanitarian relief. As our guest Jennifer Johnson demonstrates in her new monograph The Battle for Algeria (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015), both the French government and the Algerian National Liberation Front used medicine and public health as a tactic, and the presence of humanitarian organizations in Algeria as well rendered the war not just a national struggle but in fact an international affair. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/10/humanitarianism-algerian-war.html Jennifer Johnson is an Assistant Professor of History at Brown University. She received her PhD from Princeton University. Her main research interests are 20th century Africa, specifically the Maghrib, nationalism, decolonization, and public health. She is the author of The Battle for Algeria: Sovereignty, Health Care, and Humanitarianism (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016). She is currently working on a book project which examines the relationship between public health and state-building in postcolonial North Africa. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History and is currently an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. Zoe Griffith is a doctoral candidate in History at Brown University working on political economy and governance in Egypt and the Ottoman Mediterranean. Zoe is a co-curator of the OHP series on legal history in the Ottoman Empire and Islamic world. Nora Lessersohn is a Ph.D. student in History and Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard University. Her work focuses on Ottoman Armenians in Anatolia, Istanbul, and the United States during the 19th and 20th centuries. CREDITS Episode No. 277 Release Date: 31 October 2016 Recording Location: Brown University Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: from archive.org - Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla; from Excavated Shellac- Lili Labassi - Mazal Haye Mazal Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro and outro music Images and bibliography courtesy of Jennifer Johnson available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/10/humanitarianism-algerian-war.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 44 Minutes 28 Oct 2016

E276 | Whereas military histories once focused narrowly on armies, battles, and technologies, the new approach to military history emphasizes how armies and navies were linked to issues such as political economy, gender, and environment. In this episode, we sit down with Gábor Ágoston to discuss the principal issues concerning the relationship between the Ottoman-Habsburg military frontier in Hungary and the environmental history of the early modern period. From the battle of Mohacs in 1526, through the dramatic battle of Vienna 1683, and until the Treaty of Sistova 1791, the Ottoman-Habsburg frontier was the site of fighting, fortification, and mobilization. In our conversation, we consider the environmental dimensions of these centuries of conflict and contact, focusing on how the military revolution transformed the way in which armies used and managed resources and the role of both anthropogenic and climatic factors in reshaping the Hungarian landscape. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/10/war-environment.html Gábor Ágoston is an Associate Professor of History at Georgetown University. He specializes in the history of the Ottoman Empire and has published widely on the subject of the Ottoman military and arms production, as well as issues of frontiers, borderlands, and environment in the early modern world. In addition to authoring Guns for the sultan: military power and the weapons industry in the Ottoman Empire (Cambridge University Press, 2005), he is co-editor of Encyclopedia of the Ottoman Empire. Graham Auman Pitts holds a doctorate in history from Georgetown University's Department of History. His dissertation, "Fallow Fields: Famine and the Making of Lebanon," probes the intersections of ecology, capital, and colonialism in the modern Middle East. He is currently a postdoctoral scholar at North Carolina State University. Faisal Husain is a doctoral student at Georgetown University researching the environmental history of the Ottoman Tigris and Euphrates rivers. CREDITS Episode No. 276 Release Date: 27 October 2016 Recording Location: Georgetown University Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: from archive.org - Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Special thanks to Monsieur Doumani for allowing us to use "The System/Το σύστημαν" in the intro music, Muhtelif for "Ta Paidia & Lamma Bada" in the interlude, and Kara Güneş for the composition "Istanbul" in the outro music. . .

  Direct Link   Download 48 Minutes 24 Oct 2016

E275 | The turn of the nineteenth century was a period of tumult and transformation in the Ottoman Empire, as in many places around the world from France to Haiti, China, and the United States. With people, ideas, and armies on the move as never before, new geopolitical pressures pushed states around the globe to reinvent their relationships to their subjects and citizens. In this episode, we talk with Ali Yaycioglu about his new book Partners of the Empire: The Crisis of the Ottoman Order in the Age of Revolutions. We explore the Ottoman experience during the Age of Revolutions, which saw the rise of new participatory mechanisms that brought Ottoman subjects from many walks of life into the arena of imperial politics. We discuss the empowerment of local committees and the election of ayans in the countryside, and consider the Janissaries as the voice of the popular will in Ottoman cities. Ultimately, we ask why new forms of participatory politics and limits on central authority failed to take root, even as they laid the foundation for later experiments in constitutional government during the Tanzimat era and beyond. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/10/ottoman-empire-revolutions.html Ali Yaycioglu is Assistant Professor of History at Stanford University. His main focus is on the transformation of the Ottoman Empire in the 18th and 19th centuries, forms of acquiring and losing wealth and power, and spatiality and spatial imaginations in the Ottoman world. Zoe Griffith is a doctoral candidate in History at Brown University working on political economy and governance in Egypt and the Ottoman Mediterranean. Zoe is a co-curator of the OHP series on legal history in the Ottoman Empire and Islamic world. CREDITS Episode No. 275 Release Date: 24 October 2016 Recording Location: ANAMED, Istanbul Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: from archive.org - Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the outro music and to Monsieur Doumani for "The System/Το σύστημαν" Images and bibliography courtesy of Ali Yaycioglu available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/10/ottoman-empire-revolutions.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 45 Minutes 22 Oct 2016

E274 | How does the structure of bureaucracies and state administrations influence the capacity for political and social change, and what are the legacies of empire for contemporary societies? In this episode, we take a comparative look at these questions by focusing on former regions of the British Empire that have been subject to different forms of political partition. Our guest Yael Berda is a sociologist who has examined the histories of British colonialism in Cyprus, Palestine, India, and beyond, and in our conversation, we focus in on the subject of population management and censuses in the Protectorate of Cyprus and Mandate Palestine. We discuss how the British administration inherited, adopted, and modified systems of governance and categorization of people from their Ottoman forebears, and we consider how ethnic, religious, and racial categories employed by the British Empire influenced eventual questions of citizenship and political partition. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/10/population-cyprus-mandate-palestine.html Yael Berda is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology & Anthropology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies (and a recovering constitutional lawyer ) She teaches and writes about bureaucracy, security and emergency practices and what these do to possibilities for democracy. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. Shireen Hamza is a doctoral student in the History of Science department at Harvard University. Her research focuses broadly on the history of science and medicine in the Islamicate Middle Ages, and more specifically on the history of women's health. CREDITS Episode No. 274 Release Date: 22 October 2016 Recording Location: Harvard University Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: from archive.org - Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; from freemusicarchive.com - Bumble Bee Bossa by Podington Bear Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the outro music Images and bibliography courtesy of Yael Berda available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/10/population-cyprus-mandate-palestine.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 60 Minutes 20 Oct 2016

E273 | The Palestinian Arabs who remained within the borders of Israel after the 1948 war became citizens of the new state. But in those early years Arab villages lived under military rule that would last nearly two decades. In this episode, Shira Robinson discusses the research for her book Citizen Strangers: Palestinians and the Birth of Israel's Liberal Settler State, which examines the crucial and neglected experience of Palestinians in the early years after the founding of the state of Israel. In our conversation, we explore how the ideal of liberal democracy and the promise of equal citizenship were at odds with the project of the nation-state. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/10/citizenship-israel.html Shira Robinson is the author of Citizen Strangers: Palestinians and the Birth of Israel’s Liberal Settler State. She teaches History and International Affairs at the George Washington University. Graham Auman Pitts holds a doctorate in history from Georgetown University's Department of History. His dissertation, "Fallow Fields: Famine and the Making of Lebanon," probes the intersections of ecology, capital, and colonialism in the modern Middle East. He is currently a postdoctoral scholar at North Carolina State University. CREDITS Episode No. 273 Release Date: 20 October 2016 Recording Location: Baltimore, MD Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Egil Daglar Ustunden Asam - Viktoriya Hanim; Turnalar Turnalar - Darulelhan Heyeti Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the outro music Images and bibliography courtesy of Shira Robinson available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/10/citizenship-israel.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 65 Minutes 16 Oct 2016

E272 | The 1925 Palestine Citizenship Order-in-Council, passed by the British government and implemented in the Palestine Mandate, was the first piece of mandate legislation to officially recognize Palestine's Arab community as citizens of Palestine rather than 'ex-enemy Ottoman subjects.' This marked a change in the legal position of Palestine's Arab residents, and a confirmation of the de facto status of Palestine's Jewish residents. But as our guest Lauren Banko explains in this episode, the reality on the ground for the Arab inhabitants of Palestine and emigrants settled outside of the former Ottoman realms did not reflect the British mandatory understanding of citizenship. In line with a communitarian understanding of nationality and civic belonging, the Palestinian Arabs reacted to the order-in-council and its subsequent amendments through actions, behaviours, and discourses which emphasized their understanding of Ottoman-era jus sanguinis and jus soli provisions of nationality and citizenship. This contrasted sharply with the order's provisions for Jewish citizenship and immigrant naturalization policy, and its denial of Palestinian citizenship to Arabs who emigrated temporarily or habitually abroad. In the mandate decades, nationality and citizenship became less like abstract or ideological concepts for Palestine's Arab community both inside and outside of Palestine as these legal statuses were integrated into most aspects of social, civic, and political life as markers of a new (and often contested) identity in a changing quasi-colonial, political, national, and social landscape. For Palestine's indigenous population, the Ottoman markers of citizenship and identity remained essential components of the opposition to, and negotiation with, the apolitical status imposed by Great Britain in the territory during the interwar period. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/10/citizenship-in-mandate-palestine.html Lauren Banko is a postdoctoral research fellow in Israel/Palestine Studies in the department of Arabic and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Manchester. She completed her PhD in 2014 in History at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), London. Her research focuses on nationality, citizenship, popular politics, borders, and emigration as related to Ottoman and Mandate Palestine and the Eastern Mediterranean between the late nineteenth to mid-twentieth century. Michael Talbot received his PhD from SOAS in 2013 for a thesis on Ottoman-British relations in the eighteenth century, and now lectures and researches on a range of topics in Ottoman history at the University of Greenwich in London. CREDITS Episode No. 272 Release Date: 16 October 2016 Recording Location: University of Greenwich, London Audio editing by Onur Engin Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro music Bibliography courtesy of Lauren Banko available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/10/citizenship-in-mandate-palestine.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 36 Minutes 12 Oct 2016

E271 | L’histoire de l’Algérie coloniale est souvent abordée du point de vue des bouleversements économiques et politiques engendrés par l’occupation française. Mais cette dernière entraîna un remaniement dans la sphère de l’intime qui fut tout aussi significatif, bien que peu étudié. Dans cet épisode, Aurélie Perrier se penche sur la question de l’évolution des formes de sexualités illicites en Algérie, particulièrement de la prostitution. Organisée et mise en place par les autorités françaises dès l’arrivée des premières troupes en 1830, la régulation de la prostitution apparait rapidement comme un enjeu médical et social majeur pour les français : il s’agit à la fois d’enrayer le péril vénérien qui sévit au XIXe siècle et d’assurer la pureté de la race « blanche » en limitant les contacts sexuels entre les deux communautés (européenne et autochtone) au cadre prostitutionnel. Si les courtisanes existaient bien à l’époque ottomane, leur statut était très différent. Nombre d’entre elles étaient musiciennes ou poètes, ce qui leur permettait de contribuer à la vie sociale et culturelle de leur société. Après 1830, la courtisane devient simple prostituée. Par ailleurs, les autorités françaises mettent en place de nouveaux espaces et modalités de contrôle des « filles soumises ». Le bordel et le quartier réservé, jusque là inconnus en Algérie, apparaissent dans une majorité de villes Algériennes tandis que médecins et police des mœurs élaborent des règles rigoureuses visant à de discipliner ces filles dont la sexualité et le mode de vie sont considérés comme dangereux. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/10/la-prostitution.html Aurelie PERRIER est docteur en histoire contemporaine du Moyen-Orient et de l'Afrique du Nord et membre du centre de Recherches Historiques à Paris. Ses centres d'intérêts principaux sont l'histoire sociale du Moyen-Orient, le Maghreb colonial, et le genre et la masculinité dans la Méditerranée du XIXe siècle. Dorothée Myriam KELLOU est une journaliste et réalisatrice basée à Paris. Elle est diplômée du master d'études arabes de l'Université de Georgetown à Washington D.C. et développe actuellement un projet de film sur les regroupements de populations pendant la guerre d'Algérie, prenant pour point de départ la mémoire/l'oubli de son père. Tout MO (Tout Moyen-Orient) est une série de podcasts en français produite en coopération avec Ottoman History Podcast. L'émission vise à offrir un regard sensible et complexe sur l'histoire et l'actualité du Moyen-Orient, à contre-courant de toutes ces idées reçues qui circulent sur la région. Dans nos différents épisodes, nous irons à la rencontre de chercheurs, universitaires, journalistes, cinéastes ou encore de photographes qui partageront avec nous leur compréhension d’une région qu’ils étudient, vivent et aiment. Pour tous les férus (présents et futurs) du Moyen-Orient ! Crédits Episode N. 271 (Tout MO N. 1) Date de rela: 12 Octobre 2016 Lieu de l’enregistrement: Paris, France Montage et production par Chris Gratien Extraits sonores: en Excavated Shellac - Lili Labassi - Mazal Haye Mazal; Munira al-Mahdiyya – Aldahre Kataâ Awsali; en archive.org Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Images et bibliographie fournies par Aurélie Perrier: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/10/la-prostitution.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 46 Minutes 19 Sep 2016

E270 | Genomic research is resolving old questions about the history of plague, revealing, for example, that the Black Death was caused by the same species of plague that exists today and demonstrating the complex ways in which plague moved throughout the medieval and early modern world. Yet even as scientific methods today shed light on the history of plague, past understandings and depictions of disease remain both highly relevant and ignored. In this episode, we chat with Lori Jones about early modern European views of plague and explore the relationship between disease, landscape, and geography within the European imagination. We talk about the origins of environmental understandings of disease and how plague became increasingly associated with eastern and southern locales such as the Ottoman Empire and Southern Europe. We also have a separate conversation (beginning at 32:30) about the misuse of medieval images concerning disease and medicine in the 21st century as digital media facilitate both the spread and disembodiment of historical images. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/09/disease-landscape-europe.html Lori Jones is a PhD Candidate in the University of Ottawa's Department of History. Her research focuses on how written portrayals of the geographical and historical origins of the plague evolved across the late medieval to early modern periods. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. Nir Shafir is a historian of the Middle East whose research examines the intersections of knowledge production, religious practice, and material culture in the early modern world (1400-1800). He curates Ottoman History Podcast’s series on history of science in addition to being one of the co-founders of hazine.info, a website that explores the archives and libraries of the Islamic world. He is currently an advanced doctoral candidate in the History Department at UCLA. Andreas Guidi is a Ph.D. candidate at the Humboldt University in Berlin and at the EHESS in Paris researching on networks, generations, and capital transmission in late and post-Ottoman Rhodes. He is also the creator of the Southeast Passage podcast. CREDITS Episode No. 270 Release Date: 19 September 2016 Recording Location: Paris, France Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla; Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro and outro music SoundCloud image: The burial of plague victims in Tournai (Detail of a miniature from “The Chronicles of Gilles Li Muisis” (1272-1352), abbot of the monastery of St. Martin of the Righteous. Bibliothèque royale de Belgique, MS 13076-77, f. 24v) Images and bibliography courtesy of Lori Jones available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/09/disease-landscape-europe.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 53 Minutes 14 Sep 2016

E269 | In many countries of the Middle East and North Africa, European colonial rule lasted only for a matter of decades, and yet its influence in the realms of politics and economy have been profound. In this episode, we talk to Jonathan Wyrtzen about the legacy of colonialism in Morocco for the politics of identity, which is the subject of his new book entitled Making Morocco. As Dr. Wyrzten explains, colonial rule shaped understandings of issues such as territoriality, religion, ethnicity, and gender that remain relevant to this day. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/09/morocco.html Jonathan Wyrtzen is an Associate Professor of Sociology, History, and International Affairs at Yale University. His research focuses on empire and colonialism, state formation and non-state forms of political organization, and ethnicity and nationalism in North Africa and the Middle East. His book Making Morocco: Colonial Intervention and the Politics of Identity was published by Cornell University Press in 2015. His current book project comparatively analyzes five sites of conflict from Morocco to Iraq to examine how new political topographies were forged in the Middle East and North Africa during the interwar period. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. CREDITS Episode No. 269 Release Date: 15 September 2016 Recording Location: Yale University Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: From archive.org - Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; From Excavated Shellac - Lili Labassi - Mazal Haye Mazal; Louisa Tounsia – Ya Bent El Nass Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro music Bibliography courtesy of Jonathan Wyrtzen available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/09/morocco.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 51 Minutes 09 Sep 2016

E268 | While the millet system has been used as a means of studying the special case of religious pluralism in the Ottoman Empire, many have pointed to the limitations of this framework in which religious communities appears as segmented units separate by firm boundaries. In this interview with Nathalie Clayer, we discuss new ways of thinking about religious pluralism in the Ottoman Empire through the case of the late Ottoman Balkans by interrogating notions such as conversion, orthodoxy, and ethnic identity. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/09/religion-balkans.html Nathalie Clayer is a professor at the EHESS and a senior research fellow at the CNRS (Paris). Her main research interests are religion, nationalism and state-building process in the Ottoman and post-Ottoman space. Her publications include Aux origines du nationalisme albanais. La naissance d’une nation majoritairement musulmane en Europe (Karthala, 2007), Conflicting Loyalties in the Balkans (Tauris, 2011) co-edited with Hannes Grandits and Robert Pichler, and Penser, agir et vivre dans l’Empire ottoman et en Turquie (Peeters, 2013), co-edited with Erdal Kaynar. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. Nir Shafir is a historian of the Middle East whose research examines the intersections of knowledge production, religious practice, and material culture in the early modern world (1400-1800). He curates Ottoman History Podcast’s series on history of science in addition to being one of the co-founders of hazine.info, a website that explores the archives and libraries of the Islamic world. He is currently an advanced doctoral candidate in the History Department at UCLA. CREDITS Episode No. 268 Release Date: 9 September 2016 Recording Location: EHESS, Paris Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Egil Daglar Ustunden Asam - Viktoriya Hanim; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro music and to Muhtelif for the use of "Ta Paidia & Lamma Bada". . .

  Direct Link   Download 48 Minutes 06 Sep 2016

E267 | During the 1920s, a publisher in Lahore published a satire on the domestic life of the Prophet Muhammad during a period of religious polemics and communal tension between Muslims and Hindus under British rule. The inflammatory text soon became a legal matter, first when the publisher was brought to trial and acquitted for "attempts to promote feelings of enmity or hatred between different classes" and again when he was murdered a few years later in retaliation for the publication. In this episode, Julie Stephens explores how this case highlights debates over the meaning of religious and political liberties, secularism, and legal transformation during British colonial rule in South Asia. In doing so, she challenges the binary juxtaposition between secular reason and religious sentiment, instead pointing to their mutual entanglement in histories of law and empire. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/09/stephens.html Julie Stephens is an assistant professor in the Department of History at Rutgers University. Her research focuses on how law has shaped religion, family, and economy in colonial and post-colonial South Asia and in the wider Indian diaspora. Her new book Governing Islam: Law, Empire, and Secularism in South Asia is forthcoming with Cambridge University Press. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. Tyler Conklin is a Ph.D. student in the Yale University History Department. His dissertation research focuses on identity formation and early modern hajj narratives in the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal Empires. CREDITS Episode No. 267 Release Date: 7 September 2016 Recording Location: Yale University Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Egil Daglar Ustunden Asam - Viktoriya Hanim; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro music Images and bibliography courtesy of Julie Stephens available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/09/stephens.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 28 Minutes 04 Sep 2016

E266 | The changing of one's religion may be viewed today as a matter of personal spirituality or identity, but as the historiography of the Ottoman Empire and elsewhere increasingly shows, conversion was often a public act with political, socioeconomic, and gendered components. In this episode, Elyse Semerdjian returns to the podcast to discuss her research on conversion in early modern Aleppo and how women sometimes utilized the act of conversion (or non-conversion) and the legal structures of the Ottoman Empire to gain the upper hand in familial and economic matters. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/09/conversion-islam-aleppo.html Elyse Semerdjian is the Director of Global Studies and Associate Professor of Middle East/Islamic World History at Whitman College. A specialist in early modern Ottoman history and Syria, she authored “Off the Straight Path”: Illicit Sex, Law, and Community in Ottoman Aleppo (Syracuse University Press, 2008) as well as several articles on gender, non-Muslims, and law in the Ottoman Empire. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. CREDITS Episode No. 266 Release Date: 4 September 2016 Recording Location: Bebek, Istanbul Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Rizeli Sadik - Erkek Kadin Oyun Havasi; Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro music Bibliography courtesy of Elyse Semerdjian available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/09/conversion-islam-aleppo.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 49 Minutes 31 Aug 2016

E265 | The Capitulations are regarded as one of the most obvious and humiliating signs of European dominance over Ottoman markets and diplomatic relations in the 19th century, granting European merchants and their Ottoman protégés extensive extraterritorial privileges within the empire. In this podcast, Professor Omar Cheta probes the limits of the Capitulations in the Ottoman province of Egypt, where the power of the local Khedives intersected and overlapped with the sovereignty of the sultan and the capitulatory authority of the British consulate. Commercial disputes involving European merchants and their protected agents on Ottoman-Egyptian soil reveal the ambiguous and negotiable nature of jurisdiction and legal identities in the mid-19th century. These ambiguous boundaries provided spaces for merchants and officials to contest the terms of extraterritorial privileges. The creation of new legal forums such as the mixed Merchants' Courts gave rise to new norms and procedures, while reliance on Shari'a traditions continued to appear in unexpected places. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/08/capitulations-egypt.html Omar Cheta is Assistant Professor of Middle Eastern and Historical Studies at Bard College. His current book project focuses on the intertwined histories of law and commerce in nineteenth-century Egypt. Zoe Griffith is a doctoral candidate in History at Brown University working on political economy and governance in Egypt and the Ottoman Mediterranean. Zoe is a co-curator of the OHP series on legal history in the Ottoman Empire and Islamic world. CREDITS Episode No. 265 Release Date: 1 September 2016 Recording Location: ANAMED Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the outro music Bibliography courtesy of Omar Cheta available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/08/capitulations-egypt.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 42 Minutes 29 Aug 2016

E264 | The period from the 1870s to 1914 was the peak of the nineteenth-century globalisation characterised by increased movement of capital across the world. In this podcast, Coşkun discusses his recent book on ‘Sovereign Debt and the International Financial Control: the Middle East and the Balkans, 1870-1914’, the role of banks as intermediaries between the Ottoman government and international financial markets, the Ottoman Public Debt Administration and the cases of sovereign debt in Egypt, Serbia and Greece. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/08/debt.html Coşkun Tuncer is Lecturer in Modern Economic History at University College London, Department of History. Previously he taught and worked as a researcher at the London School of Economics and the European University Institute. He received his PhD from the London School of Economics in 2011 after completing his BA, MSc and MPhil degrees in Turkey and Greece. His research focuses on the economic and financial history of the Middle East and Southeast Europe, and long-term history of international financial markets. His recent book is entitled Sovereign Debt and the International Financial Control: the Middle East and the Balkans, 1870-1914 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015). Taylan Güngör is a doctoral candidate at SOAS in London. His interests are in Medieval and Pre-Modern Eastern Mediterranean trading circles and his research is on trade in Istanbul after 1453. Michael Talbot received his PhD from SOAS in 2013 for a thesis on Ottoman-British relations in the eighteenth century, and now lectures and researches on a range of topics in Ottoman history at the University of Greenwich in London. CREDITS Episode No. 264 Release Date: 29 August 2016 Recording Location: School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) Audio Editing by Taylan Güngör Recorded at SOAS Radio studios. SOAS Radio is an outlet for creative media and talent housed by the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. Run by alumni, current students and staff at the School, including volunteers from like-minded communities, SOAS Radio is dedicated to varied and original programming on world music, culture and current affairs. Musical Excerpt: Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer Bibliography courtesy of Coşkun Tuncer available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/08/debt.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 56 Minutes 26 Aug 2016

E263 | Ottoman History Podcast'in bu bölümünde, Nurçin İleri ile geç dönem Osmanlı İstanbul’unda gece, korku ve suç ilişkisi üzerine konuştuk. Farklı toplumsal tabakalardan insanların, demografik ve fiziksel anlamda hızla dönüşen kent mekanınını sokakların aydınlatılması çalışmaları, geceleri mobilite, kamusal eğlence ve aktivitelerin kontrolü ekseninde nasıl deneyimledikleri ve ne hissettiklerini tartıştık. Aynı zamanda geceleri kent mekanlarının iktidar ilişkilerini nasıl yeniden ürettiğini ve bunların temsiliyet biçimlerini ele aldık. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/08/gece.html Doktorasını 2015 yılında Binghamton Üniversitesi, Tarih Bölümü'nde tamamlayan Nurçin İleri, Boğaziçi Arşiv ve Dokümantasyon Merkezi’nde koordinatör yardımcısı. Çalışmalarında, XIX. Yüzyıl Osmanlı ve Erken Cumhuriyet dönemi liman kentlerinde yaşanan toplumsal ve kültürel dönüşümleri, sosyal tarih, teknoloji tarihi, duyuların tarihi ve toplumsal cinsiyet tartışmaları ekseninde ele almaktadır. Ufuk Adak University of Cincinnati'den Tarih doktorası aldı. Doktora tezi, son dönem Osmanlı İmparatorluğu'nda doğu Akdeniz liman kentlerindeki sosyal ve politik dönüşümü suç, ceza, sosyal kontrol ve hapishaneler üzerinden ele almaktadır. Adak, Berlin'de Zentrum Moderner Orient'te (ZMO) doktora sonrası araştırmalarda bulunmuştur. YAPIM VE YAYIN Bölüm No. 263 Yayın Tarihi: 26 Ağustos 2016 Kayit Yeri: ANAMED Ses Editörü: Chris Gratien Müzik: Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Muhtelif - Ta Paidia, Bint El Shalabiya Görseller ve kaynakça: Nurçin İleri'nin müsadesiyle - http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/08/gece.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 40 Minutes 25 Aug 2016

E262 | The illustrated account of the festivals surrounding the circumcision of Sultan Ahmed III's sons in 1720 is one of the most iconic and celebrated depictions of urban life in Ottoman Istanbul. With its detailed text written by Vehbi, accompanied by the vibrant miniature paintings of Levni, this work has been used as a source for understanding the cast of professions and personalities that occupied the public space of the Ottoman capital. In this episode, we focus not on the colorful characters of Levni's paintings but rather the backdrop for the celebrations: the Golden Horn and the waterfront of 18th-century Istanbul. As our guest Gwendolyn Collaço explains, the accounts of festivals in early modern Istanbul reflect the transformation of the city and an orientation towards the waterfront not only in the Ottoman Empire but also neighboring states of the Mediterranean. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/08/levni.html Gwendolyn Collaço is a Ph.D. candidate specializing in Ottoman painting and social history. Her dissertation analyzes costume albums produced by bazaar artists and their translations into European turquerie. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. Nir Shafir is a historian of the Middle East whose research examines the intersections of knowledge production, religious practice, and material culture in the early modern world (1400-1800). He curates Ottoman History Podcast’s series on history of science in addition to being one of the co-founders of hazine.info, a website that explores the archives and libraries of the Islamic world. He is currently Assistant Professor of History at the University of California, San Diego. Huma Gupta is a Ph.D. student at the Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture (AKPIA) at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her dissertation research focuses on the structural relationships between urban planning, architecture, state formation and migration in modern Iraq. She is also interested in the sonic and visual past and continues to think of ways to integrate sensory histories into her research. CREDITS Episode No. 262 Release Date: 24 August 2016 Recording Location: Cambridge, MA Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla; Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Special thanks to Kerimov for allowing us to use Mario "Üsküdar'a Gider İken" https://soundcloud.com/onurkerimov/mario-uskudara-gider-iken in the intro music and to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the outro music Images and bibliography courtesy of Gwendolyn Collaço available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/08/levni.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 51 Minutes 23 Aug 2016

E261 | Emerging as a literary genre towards the end of the nineteenth century, the Ottoman novel has been overshadowed by the transformation of the Turkish language and alphabet after 1928. In this episode, we speak with Melih Levi about his recent English translation with Monica Ringer of one the first examples of the Ottoman novel, Ahmed Midhat Efendi's Felatun Bey and Rakım Efendi (Syracuse University Press, 2016). Far from a derivative imitation of European literary themes and forms, Ahmed Midhat's novel revolves both seriously and playfully around the concepts of ala franga and ala turca, cajoling and instructing its readers on how live as authentically "modern" Ottomans in a rapidly modernizing empire. Published in 1875, the novel opens windows onto the Ottoman family, slavery, masculinity, and social orders, as well as literal and psychological relations with Europe in nineteenth-century Istanbul. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/08/translating-ottoman-novel.html Melih Levi received his BA in English Literature from Amherst College and will be starting his PhD in Comparative Literature at Stanford in the Fall. His work focuses on divergent modernisms, transcultural poetics and prosody. Zoe Griffith is a doctoral candidate in History at Brown University working on political economy and governance in Egypt and the Ottoman Mediterranean. Zoe is a co-curator of the OHP series on legal history in the Ottoman Empire and Islamic world. CREDITS Episode No. 261 Release Date: 23 August 2016 Recording Location: ANAMED, Istanbul Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla; Egil Daglar Ustunden Asam - Viktoriya Hanim; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Bibliography courtesy of Melih Levi available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/08/translating-ottoman-novel.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 39 Minutes 22 Aug 2016

E260 | Ottoman-German relations have usually been studied in the context of great-power politics, imperialism both hard and soft, or the military and economic spheres. In this podcast Philipp Wirtz presents some initial findings of a larger research project focusing on personal networks and experiences of Germans residing in the late Ottoman Empire and early Turkish Republic and two German expatriates in particular: the journalist Friedrich Schrader and the academic Martin Hartmann. As theatre-goers, buyers of books and writers of literary reviews, both took an active part in the cultural life of the Ottoman capital in the years following the Young Turk Revolution. Using their local knowledge and fluency in Ottoman Turkish, both were able to gain unique insights at odds with the popular portrayal of Ottoman affairs in the western media. On the other hand, neither of these authors was immune to the biases of their times, constantly questioning the extent to which Ottoman literary expression, and in particular the emerging “Turkish national literature” were “original” or “civilised. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/08/germans-ottoman-istanbul.html Philipp Wirtz studied the history, languages and cultures of Europe and the Middle East in Frankfurt am Main, Bamberg and London, with research trips taking him to Iran and Turkey in between. He received his PhD from SOAS, University of London, in 2013 for a dissertation that analysed the ways in which the 'lost world' of the Ottoman Empire was presented in Turkish autobiographies of the 20th century. He currently is a Teaching Fellow in Middle East History at the Department of History, University of Warwick, and Senior Teaching Fellow at SOAS Taylan Güngör is a doctoral candidate at SOAS in London. His interests are in Medieval and Pre-Modern Eastern Mediterranean trading circles and his research is on trade in Istanbul after 1453. Michael Talbot received his PhD from SOAS in 2013 for a thesis on Ottoman-British relations in the eighteenth century, and now lectures and researches on a range of topics in Ottoman history at the University of Greenwich in London. CREDITS Episode No. 260 Release Date: 22 August 2016 Recording Location: School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) Audio Editing by Taylan Güngör Recorded at SOAS Radio studios. SOAS Radio is an outlet for creative media and talent housed by the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. Run by alumni, current students and staff at the School, including volunteers from like-minded communities, SOAS Radio is dedicated to varied and original programming on world music, culture and current affairs. Sound excerpt: Ben Yemenimi Al Isterim - Hafiz Burhan Bibliography courtesy of Philipp Wirtz available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/08/germans-ottoman-istanbul.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 47 Minutes 17 Aug 2016

E259 | In this episode, we talk with Marc Aymes about his approach to Ottoman provincial history through the history of 19th century Cyprus. What is the difference between an Ottoman "provincial history" and "a history of the Ottoman provinces?" Can a "provincial" approach to Ottoman history change the way we understand major questions in Ottoman historiography, including the impact of 19th century reforms (Tanzimat), the role of Europe and Europeans in Ottoman society, and the relationship between Istanbul and other parts of the Sultan's well-protected domains? How might research on Ottoman Cyprus enable us to rethink not only established hypotheses about Ottoman governance, social life, and political transformation in the 19th century, but also our very modes of doing and understanding history itself? More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/08/cyprus.html Marc Aymes is a Permanent Research Fellow at CNRS (France) affiliated with the Centre d’Études Turques, Ottomanes, Balkaniques et Centrasiatiques. Over the past few years, he conducted research and teaching in Cyprus, Greece, France, Germany, Turkey and the US, with a focus on Mediterranean provincials and forging Ottomans. Recent publications include A Provincial History of the Ottoman Empire: Cyprus and the Eastern Mediterranean in the Nineteenth Century and Order and Compromise: Government Practices in Turkey from the Late Ottoman Empire to the Early 21st Century (co-edited with Benjamin Gourisse and Élise Massicard). Susanna Ferguson is a Ph.D. Candidate in Middle Eastern History at Columbia University. She is currently working on a dissertation entitled "Tracing Tarbiya: Women, Gender and Childrearing in Egypt and Lebanon, 1865-1939." CREDITS Episode No. 259 Release Date: 18 August 2016 Recording Location: Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the outro music Bibliography courtesy of Marc Aymes available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/08/cyprus.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 46 Minutes 16 Aug 2016

E258 | The body of water now known as the Red Sea lay well within the bounds of the Ottoman Empire's well-protected domains for nearly four centuries. It wasn't until the 19th century, however, that this body of water began to be called or conceived of as "the Red Sea" by either Ottomans or Europeans. In this episode, Professor Alexis Wick argues that we have much to learn about how history (and Ottoman history in particular) "makes its object" by studying not only the emergence of the concept of the Red Sea, Ottoman or otherwise, but also the surprising absence of such a history in previous scholarship. His new book The Red Sea: In Search of Lost Space (University of California Press, 2016) is both a conceptual history of the Red Sea as seen through both Ottoman and European eyes, and a reflection on the methodologies, tropes, and preoccupations of Ottoman history writ large. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/08/red-sea.html Alexis Wick is is Assistant Professor of history at the American University of Beirut. His first book, The Red Sea: In Search of Lost Space (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2016), presents an innovative account of the Ottoman Red Sea world even as it traces the genealogy of the concept of the sea. His current research explores the history of coffee, the poetics and practices of space in the Islamic tradition, and the introduction of a new concept of humanity in 19th century Ottoman and Arabic discourse. He is also writing a collection of essays on the various embodiments of the idea of Palestine in different times and places. Susanna Ferguson is a Ph.D. Candidate in Middle Eastern History at Columbia University. She is currently working on a dissertation entitled "Tracing Tarbiya: Women, Gender and Childrearing in Egypt and Lebanon, 1865-1939." CREDITS Episode No. 258 Release Date: 16 August 2016 Recording Location: American University, Beirut Audio Editing by Onur Engin Sound excerpts: Müzeyyen Senar - Gülsen-i Hüsnüne Kimler Varıyor Images and bibliography courtesy of Alexis Wick available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/08/red-sea.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 58 Minutes 10 Aug 2016

E257 | The Ottoman slave trade, which was part of an increasingly globalized trafficking network of the early modern period, brought millions of people from the surrounding regions of Europe, Asia, and Africa to the Ottoman Empire. While abolition and emancipation movements occurred in various forms throughout the last century of the empire's history, slavery remained in practice until its very end. In recent decades, the ignored history of the Ottoman slave trade has received more attention, but there has been considerably less discussion of how enslaved people brought to the empire contributed to its socioeconomic and cultural transformation and where the descendants of such people can be found today. In this episode, we talk to Michael Ferguson about his research on the African diaspora in modern Turkey, especially around the city of Izmir. We discuss the origins of Izmir's Afro-Turk community, their historical experience during the late Ottoman and early Republican periods, and the ways in which the Afro-Turk identity has been transformed and revived in recent years. We also delve into shared aspects of history and culture between diasporic African communities in other parts of the Middle East. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/08/african-diaspora-izmir.html Michael Ferguson is a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), London, UK. Michael’s research focuses on questions of identity, marginalization, and minorities in the late Ottoman Empire and early republican Turkey. His current book project examines the relatively unknown social and cultural history of enslaved and emancipated Africans and their descendants in Izmir in the late Ottoman Empire. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. Saghar Sadeghian is currently Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Willamette University. She is a former Henry Hart Rice Family Foundation Fellow and Lecturer at Yale University's MacMillan Center. Her research focuses on the ideas of nationality, constitution, and modern institutions in Iran, Iraq, and Afghanistan during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. She is specifically interested in minority groups in the Middle East and the question of gender, race, religion and ethnicity. CREDITS Episode No. 257 Release Date: 10 August 2016 Recording Location: Yale University Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Esmeray - 13.5 (digitized vinyl) Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro music Bibliography courtesy of Michael Ferguson available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/08/african-diaspora-izmir.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 55 Minutes 07 Aug 2016

E256 | After facing the destruction of their community during the First World War, former Ottoman Armenians set about rebuilding in Turkey first during a period of relative optimism under the Allied occupation of Istanbul and later as non-Muslim citizens of new Turkish nation-state. In her new work entitled Recovering Armenia, Lerna Ekmekçioğlu explores the changes and continuities in the identity of Istanbul's Armenian community during this transformative period. In this interview, we explore Armenian collective politics, feminist movements, and expressions of loyalty through the Armenian press and through the writings of women in particular, and we examine the issue of Armenian belonging in Turkey through the lens of "secular dimmitude" among non-Muslim citizens of a predominantly Muslim but secular republic. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/07/armenians-early-republican-turkey.html Lerna Ekmekçioğlu is McMillan-Stewart Associated Professor of History at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She works on Armenian and Ottoman/Turkish history, including women’s history. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. Nir Shafir is a historian of the Middle East whose research examines the intersections of knowledge production, religious practice, and material culture in the early modern world (1400-1800). He curates Ottoman History Podcast’s series on history of science in addition to being one of the co-founders of hazine.info, a website that explores the archives and libraries of the Islamic world. He is currently an advanced doctoral candidate in the History Department at UCLA. Eda Çakmakçı is a PhD student in the Anthropology and Middle Eastern Studies Program at Harvard University. Her research focuses on the politics of nature in Turkey. CREDITS Episode No. 256 Release Date: 6 August 2016 Recording Location: Massachusetts Institute of Technology Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Urakh Ler - Mari Pozapalian; Egil Daglar Ustunden Asam - Viktoriya Hanim; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Murat Kenarinda - Agyazar Efendi Images and bibliography courtesy of Lerna Ekmekçioğlu available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/07/armenians-early-republican-turkey.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 55 Minutes 04 Aug 2016

E255 | Interest in Ottoman photography has tended to focus on the orientalist gaze or the view from the imperial center. In this episode, Armen T. Marsoobian offers us the unique lens of the Dildilian family of Armenian photographers in provincial Anatolia. Around the turn of the twentieth century, the Dildilians worked to memorialize portraits of fragmenting families and to document everyday scenes in provincial cities such as Sivas, Samsun, and Merzifon. Marsoobian, himself a descendant of the Dildilians, has woven together the family's remarkable photographic archive along with their memoirs and oral histories, to describe how through ingenuity and professional connections, the family and with them much of their art survived the genocide in 1915-16. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/08/armenian-photography-anatolia.html Armen T. Marsoobian is Professor and Chair of Philosophy at Southern Connecticut State University and editor of the journal Metaphilosophy. In addition to his numerous publications in American philosophy, aesthetics, and genocide studies, he is the author of Fragments of a Lost Homeland: Remembering Armenia (IB Taurus, 2015), and has organized numerous exhibitions of the Ottoman-era photography of the Dildilian family in Anatolia. Zoe Griffith is a doctoral candidate in the Department of History at Brown University. Her work focuses on political economy and governance in Egypt and the Ottoman Mediterranean. Zoe is a co-curator of the Ottoman History Podcast series entitled "Continuity and Transformation in Islamic Law." CREDITS Episode No. 255 Release Date: 4 August 2016 Recording Location: Koç RCAC, Istanbul Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Special thanks to Sato Moughalian for the use of "Al Ayloughs (Komitas)" and "Keler Tsoler (Komitas)" Images courtesy of Armen Marsoobian available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/08/armenian-photography-anatolia.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 29 Minutes 02 Aug 2016

E254 | Since its foundation in 1928 by Boghos Nubar, son of Egyptian Prime Minister and Ottoman dignitary Nubar Pasha, the Nubarian library in Paris has served as a major resource for Armenian intellectual life and historical research in the diaspora. What is less well-known is how the library's rich holdings in Ottoman Turkish, Armeno-Turkish, French and English as well as in Armenian might be useful for historians of the larger Ottoman world. In this episode, we talk with library director Boris Ajemian about the extensive archival, photographic, and periodical collections available at the Nubarian library, new directions and possibilities for Armenian and Ottoman social and cultural history, and the library's own fascinating past. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/08/nubar.html Dr. Boris Adjemian is the Director of the Nubarian Library and author of La fanfare du Négus: Les Arméniens en Éthiopie. Matthew Ghazarian is a Ph.D. student in Columbia University's Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, African Studies. His research focuses on the intersections of sectarianism, humanitarianism, and political economy in central and eastern Anatolia between 1856 and 1893. Susanna Ferguson is a Ph.D. Candidate in Middle Eastern History at Columbia University. She is currently working on a dissertation entitled "Tracing Tarbiya: Women, Gender and Childrearing in Egypt and Lebanon, 1865-1939." CREDITS Episode No. 254 Release Date: 2 August 2016 Recording Location: Nubarian Library, Paris Editing and production by Chris Gratien Special thanks to Sato Moughalian for use of "Chinar Es" and "Habrban" (Find on CD Baby | iTunes) Images and bibliography courtesy of Boris Adjemian available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/08/nubar.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 72 Minutes 31 Jul 2016

E253 | The styles of Iznik and Kütahya porcelain, which have become synonymous with excellence in Ottoman-Turkish ceramics, adorned and renovated buildings in a radius extending beyond the Anatolian heartland and including Damascus, Mecca, and Cairo. They bear a striking resemblance to the colorful and ornate tiles on many buildings in the city of Jerusalem today, including the Dome of the Rock. This is due to the fact that the iconic ceramics industry of Jerusalem was founded after the First World War by Armenian ceramists who had gotten their start in the resurgent tile industry of late Ottoman Kütahya. As we learn from our guest in this episode, Sato Moughalian, the transfer of this celebrated ceramics tradition from Kütahya to Jerusalem was largely through the figure of David Ohannessian (1884-1953), a master ceramist who came up in the local ceramic arts of the western Anatolian region and received commissions from the likes of Ottoman governors, revivalist architects, and European notables, including Sir Mark Sykes. He survived the travails of deportation to the Syrian desert during WWI only to recreate his art and business in Mandate Palestine. In the podcast, we trace the material history of Ottoman Armenians through the life and journeys of Ohannessian and reflect on the history of Armenian music through some pieces recorded by Moughalian and her colleagues. Visuals and more at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/07/armenian-ceramics.html New York flutist Sato Moughalian has a multi-faceted career, performing as a chamber musician, solo and orchestral player, and has recorded widely. In 1993, she founded Perspectives Ensemble at Columbia University to culturally contextualize the works of composers and in 2013 was awarded the Catalan government's Ramon Llull Prize for Creative Arts for her work on Xavier Montsalvatge. Additionally, she has been researching the life of her grandfather, David Ohannessian (1884-1953), who founded the Armenian ceramics tradition in Jerusalem in 1919, and is writing his biography for publication by Redwood Press/Stanford University Press. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. Seçil Yılmaz received her PhD degree in History from the Graduate Center, CUNY with her dissertation entitled “Love in the Time of Syphilis: Medicine and Sex in the Ottoman Empire, 1860-1922.” She is currently a Mellon postdoctoral fellow at the Society for the Humanities and Near Eastern Studies at Cornell University. CREDITS Episode No. 253 Release Date: 31 July 2016 Recording Location: Manhattan, NY Editing and production by Chris Gratien Images and bibliography courtesy of Sato Moughalian Music courtesy of Sato Moughalian TRACK LIST from Oror / Lullaby by Sato Moughalian & Alyssa Reit Find it on iTunes - https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/oror-lullaby/id988550822 Tamzara Shushiki (Komitas) Gurung (Komitas) Keler Tsoler (Komitas) Miyan Kez (Suni) Arants Kez Inch Ganim (Sayat-Nova) from Sato Moughalian, Jacqueline Kerrod, and John Hadfield Kamancha (Sayat-Nova), arrangement by Alyssa Reit Makam, arrangement by John Hadfield Images and bibliography available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/07/armenian-ceramics.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 37 Minutes 28 Jul 2016

E252 | Geneticists and historians are generally considered strange bedfellows. However, new advances in bio-archaeology and genetics are facilitating this odd coupling. In this episode, we speak to Nükhet Varlık, author of Plague and Empire in the Early Modern Mediterranean World : the Ottoman experience, 1347-1600 (Cambridge University Press), about how genetic evidence has transformed the study of the Plague in the past ten years, allowing geneticists to more readily identify the presence of Yersinia pestis bacteria in a human remains. Whereas before historians had been hesitant to diagnose diseases posthumously, they can now speak with greater certainty about the presence of plague. We then discuss the life of plague in the early modern Ottoman Empire in particular, focusing on the creation of ‘plague capitals’ in the urban centers of the Ottoman Empire following the conquest of Constantinople and how integrating the Ottoman experience of plague changes the story of how historians of medicine approach the topic. To inspire future collaborations among our listeners, we end with a peek at the process of working with geneticists and what such approaches can contribute to the study of the history of the Middle East. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/07/plague.html Nükhet Varlık is Associate Professor of History at Rutgers University–Newark. She is a historian of the Ottoman Empire interested in disease, medicine, and public health. Nir Shafir is a historian of the Middle East whose research examines the intersections of knowledge production, religious practice, and material culture in the early modern world (1400-1800). He curates Ottoman History Podcast’s series on history of science in addition to being one of the co-founders of hazine.info, a website that explores the archives and libraries of the Islamic world. He is currently an advanced doctoral candidate in the History Department at UCLA. CREDITS Episode No. 252 Release Date: 29 July 2016 Recording Location: Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla; Egil Daglar Ustunden Asam - Viktoriya Hanim; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Special thanks to Muhtelif for allowing us to use "Bint El Shalabiya" Images and bibliography courtesy of Nükhet Varlık avaiable at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/07/plague.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 40 Minutes 26 Jul 2016

E251 | Commentaries are a common, even a nearly ineluctable, part of the textual landscape of the early modern Ottoman Empire. Especially when it came to philosophy, commentaries were perhaps the main venue of discussions. An earlier generation of scholars believed these commentaries to be derivative but we now see them as a major piece in the development of the philosophical tradition in the Middle East. In this podcast, we speak with L.W.C (Eric) van Lit about how to approach these commentaries and their effect on the intellectual life of the Ottoman Empire in the fifteenth and sixteenth century. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/07/ghazali.html Eric van Lit works on the history of Islamic philosophy and theology, especially of the post-classical period. He wrote a dissertation on the notion of a world of image in Suhrawardī (d. 1191) and his commentators, at Utrecht University in the Netherlands. He is currently a postdoc at Yale University. You can find more information at www.digitalorientalist.com. Nir Shafir is a historian of the Middle East whose research examines the intersections of knowledge production, religious practice, and material culture in the early modern world (1400-1800). He curates Ottoman History Podcast’s series on history of science in addition to being one of the co-founders of hazine.info, a website that explores the archives and libraries of the Islamic world. He is currently an advanced doctoral candidate in the History Department at UCLA. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. CREDITS Episode No. 251 Release Date: 27 July 2016 Recording Location: Yale University Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Special thanks to Muhtelif for allowing us to use "Bint El Shalabiya" in the intro music and Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the outro music Bibliography courtesy of Eric van Lit available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/07/ghazali.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 46 Minutes 24 Jul 2016

E250 | A man known as Wojciech Bobowski to some, Albertus Bobovius to others, and Ali Ufki to yet others, is one of the prime examples of an early modern intermediary operating in the seventeenth-century Ottoman Empire. In this podcast, we discuss with Michael Tworek the fascinating figure of the Bobovius, from his childhood in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, to his capture in a Tatar slave raid, to his numerous translations both from and to Ottoman Turkish. These included musical treatises, the translation of the New Testament, the Genevan Psalter and more. In particular, we focus on how Bobovius mediated and developed his image as an inter-imperial mediator to his correspondents in the Republic of Letters. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/07/bobovius-ali-ufki.html Michael T. Tworek is a Lecturer on History and Literature at Harvard University, where he earned his PhD in History in 2014. Michael’s areas of research include the Renaissance in central and eastern Europe, the reception of classical tradition, history of education and travel, and global early modern history. He has series of forthcoming articles on cross-cultural encounters of Polish travelers in China, Italy, Istanbul, and Dutch Brazil and is completing a monograph on the rebirth of cosmopolitanism through travel and learning in sixteenth-century Europe. Nir Shafir is a historian of the Middle East whose research examines the intersections of knowledge production, religious practice, and material culture in the early modern world (1400-1800). He curates Ottoman History Podcast’s series on history of science in addition to being one of the co-founders of hazine.info, a website that explores the archives and libraries of the Islamic world. He is currently Assistant Professor of History at the University of California, San Diego. Polina Ivanova is a Ph.D. Candidate at Harvard University and a 2016-18 Tyler Fellow at Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection. Her interests include history of the medieval Mediterranean, Anatolia and Iran, as well as archaeology and material culture studies. Shireen Hamza is a doctoral student in the History of Science department at Harvard University. Her research focuses broadly on the history of science and medicine in the Islamicate Middle Ages, and more specifically on the history of women's health. CREDITS Episode No. 250 Release Date: 24 July 2016 Recording Location: Cambridge, MA Editing and production by Chris Gratien Special thanks to DÜNYA ensemble for use of "The Psalms of Ali Ufki" in this episode Bibliography courtesy of Michael Tworek available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/07/bobovius-ali-ufki.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 51 Minutes 15 Jul 2016

E249 | We often regard print as a motor of social change, leaving revolutions in its wake, whether political and religious. For historians of the Middle East, this line of thought always leads to the (predictable) question: why didn’t Muslims or Ottomans or Arabs adopt print? In this episode, Kathryn Schwartz discusses why this question is often poorly posed and then delves into an in-depth look at how and why people used print in one particular historical context—nineteenth-century Cairo. Touching upon topics such Napoleon, Mehmed Ali, and the Bulaq press, we explore how print slowly and haphazardly embedded itself into various aspects of Egyptian learned life. This fresh history casts nineteenth-century Egypt in a new light by examining the technological adaptation of print not as an act of unstoppable and transformative modernity, but as a slow and incremental expansion of already existing practices of book production. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/07/print-cairo.html Kathryn Schwartz is an Arabist and historian of the modern Middle East. She is currently the Postdoctoral Fellow for the Digital Library of the Eastern Mediterranean at Harvard. Kathryn earned her Ph.D. in History and Middle Eastern Studies from Harvard in 2015, and her B.A. in Arabic and Middle Eastern Studies from King’s College, the University of Cambridge in 2008. She is currently revising her dissertation into a book entitled "Print and the People of Cairo, 19th century." Nir Shafir is a historian of the Middle East whose research examines the intersections of knowledge production, religious practice, and material culture in the early modern world (1400-1800). He curates Ottoman History Podcast’s series on history of science in addition to being one of the co-founders of hazine.info, a website that explores the archives and libraries of the Islamic world. He is currently Assistant Professor of History at the University of California, San Diego. CREDITS Episode No. 249 Release Date: 15 July 2016 Recording Location: Cambridge, MA Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Egil Daglar Ustunden Asam - Viktoriya Hanim; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro music Images and bibliography courtesy of Kathryn Schwartz available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/07/print-cairo.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 32 Minutes 13 Jul 2016

E248 | With political and economic developments in 19th century Egypt, the lives of women began to change in dramatic ways. From the rise of wage labor and the restructuring of rural households to the emergence of women's movements and publications, pre-colonial Egypt witnessed numerous transformation in the realm of gender. In this episode, Liat Kozma shares her research regarding some of the most marginalized women in Egyptian society during this period of change. Manumitted slaves, doctors and midwives, factory employees, and sex workers were some groups of women who left many historical traces in the police, court, and medical records of the Khedival government. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/07/marginalized-women-in-egypt.html Liat Kozma is a senior lecturer at the Department of Islamic and Middle East Studies, the Hebrew University. She is currently working on a book manuscript on regulated prostitution in the interwar Middle East and North Africa. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. Susanna Ferguson is a Ph.D. Candidate in Middle Eastern History at Columbia University. She is currently working on a dissertation entitled "Tracing Tarbiya: Women, Gender and Childrearing in Egypt and Lebanon, 1865-1939." CREDITS Episode No. 248 Release Date: 14 July 2016 Recording Location: Okmeydanı, Istanbul Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Image and bibliography courtesy of Liat Kozma Image source: US Library of Congress - https://www.loc.gov/item/2002718733/. . .

  Direct Link   Download 42 Minutes 11 Jul 2016

E247 | During the late nineteenth century, Egyptian society witnessed the rise of new debates and practices concerning reading and writing in the Arabic language. In this episode, Hoda Yousef explores the discources surrounding literacy in Egypt, which is the subject of her first book entitled Composing Egypt (Stanford University Press, 2016). This work examines how different actors from Islamic modernists and feminists to journalists and officials sought to produce particular kinds of Egyptians through language politics. Dr. Yousef demonstrates that emergent practices of reading and writing had impacts well beyond the conventionally-defined literate circles. Even for those who did not read and write, the written word became an important part of daily life. Through the medium of public exchange created by the writing, different segments of Egyptian society could engage in discussions regarding nation, home, and belonging. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/07/literacy-egypt.html Hoda Yousef is Assistant Professor of History at Denison University. Her research focuses on the social and cultural history of language, literacy, education, and gender in modern Egypt. Graham Auman Pitts is a PhD Candidate in Georgetown University's History department, where he studies the environmental history of the modern Middle East. He is currently finishing a dissertation entitled "Fallow Fields: Famine and the Making of Lebanon (1914-1952)," which probes the intersections of ecology, capital, and colonialism. CREDITS Episode No. 247 Release Date: 11 July 2016 Recording Location: Georgetown University Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Abdel Wahab-Balash--Nile records # 117-B Images and bibliography courtesy of Hoda Yousef available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/07/literacy-egypt.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 42 Minutes 08 Jul 2016

E246 | The fountain standing in the Hippodrome (At Meydanı) in Istanbul, located just a few steps away from some of Turkey’s most famous tourist attractions like Hagia Sophia and the Blue Mosque, doesn’t attract much notice these days. But wrapped up in this monument, gifted to the people of the city by the German Emperor Wilhelm II, is a story that sheds some light on the bilateral relations between the Ottoman Empire and their European neighbors before WWI. What is the role that the arts play in this diplomatic relationship? Under what conditions could such an object be inserted in the topography of Istanbul’s historic monuments? In this episode, Emily Neumeier and Sotirios Dimitriadis speak with Lorenz Korn about his research on the imperial fountain, tracing the process of its design, construction and reception. This episode is part of an ongoing series entitled "The Visual Past." Images and more at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/07/german-fountain.html Lorenz Korn is an art historian and archaeologist of the Islamic world. Since 2003, he has served as full professor of Islamic Art and Archaeology at the University of Bamberg. His research focuses on the architecture of the central Islamic lands between the 10th and 16th centuries, Islamic minor arts such as metalwork, and Arabic epigraphy. His recent publications include articles and books on the architecture of the mosque and on artistic exchange between Europe and the Islamic World. Emily Neumeier is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Art History at University of Pennsylvania. Her research concerns the art and architecture of the Ottoman Empire and Turkish Republic. She is currently preparing a thesis on the architectural patronage of provincial notables in Ottoman Greece and Albania. Emily is also editor of stambouline, a site where travel and the Ottoman world meet. Sotirios Dimitriadis is a historian of the late Ottoman Empire, whose research focuses on issues of urban and social history. He completed his doctoral dissertation in the School of Oriental and African Studies, at the University of London, and is currently teaching at the International Hellenic University. CREDITS Episode No. 246 Release Date: 8 July 2016 Recording Location: University of Bamberg Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Special thanks to Muhtelif for allowing us to use "Bint El Shalabiya" in the outro music Images and bibliography courtesy of Lorenz Korn available at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/07/german-fountain.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 49 Minutes 05 Jul 2016

E245 | In the classical Ottoman period, European embassies in Istanbul pretty much looked like any other residential building. At the end of the eighteenth century, however, a period of dramatic geo-political and social change, official foreign residences likewise underwent a process of transformation. Architectural designs shifted from Ottoman to Western styles, and these landmarks became increasingly prominent and visible in the urban landscape. In this episode, Emily Neumeier speaks with Paolo Girardelli about how Pera became the “district of diplomacy” in the Ottoman capital, the subject of his forthcoming book project, Landscapes of the Eastern Question: Architecture and Identity in Galata, Pera, and the Bosphorus, 1774-1919. This episode is part of an ongoing series entitled "The Visual Past." http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/07/pera.html Paolo Girardelli is Associate Professor of History at Boğaziçi University in Istanbul. He is an art and architectural historian, working especially on European and non-Muslim presence in the late Ottoman cities. His publications and graduate seminars focus on the relation between space, visuality, diplomacy, religion and communal identities in the multi-cultural contexts of the Eastern Mediterranean. Emily Neumeier is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Art History at University of Pennsylvania. Her research concerns the art and architecture of the Ottoman Empire and Turkish Republic. She is currently preparing a thesis on the architectural patronage of provincial notables in Ottoman Greece and Albania. Emily is also editor of stambouline, a site where travel and the Ottoman world meet. CREDITS Episode No. 245 Release Date: 5 July 2016 Recording Location: Kunsthistorisches Institut, Florence Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro music Images and bibliography courtesy of Paolo Girardelli Bibliography and images at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/07/pera.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 50 Minutes 01 Jul 2016

E244 | As spaces fundamental to Muslim religious and communal life, mosques have historically served as sites of not just architectural but also ideological construction. As our guest Kishwar Rizvi argues in her latest book entitled The Transnational Mosque (UNC Press 2015), states operating in transnational contexts have taken a leading role in the building of mosques and in doing so, they forge political, economic, and architectural networks that span the globe. In this episode, we discuss the architectural exports of the four states covered in Prof. Rizvi's monograph: Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates. In addition to situating and comparing transnational mosques of different states, we give special attention to the rise of Neo-Ottoman architecture in modern Turkey and its role in re-branding Turkey's image on the global stage. This episode is part of an ongoing series entitled "The Visual Past." http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/07/mosque.html Kishwar Rizvi is Associate Professor of Islamic Art and Architecture at Yale University. She writes on issues of religion, politics, and self-representation in the early modern period, as well as on the intersection of nationalism and architecture in the modern Middle East Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. CREDITS Episode No. 244 Release Date: 2 July 2016 Recording Location: Yale University Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Egil Daglar Ustunden Asam - Viktoriya Hanim; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro music and to Muhtelif for the use of "Ta Paidia & Lamma Bada" Images and bibliography courtesy of Kishwar Rizvi Additional photographs courtesy of Leili Vatani Images and bibliography at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/07/mosque.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 32 Minutes 30 Jun 2016

Join us in this special introductory episode to "The Visual Past" series on Ottoman History Podcast featuring Nina Ergin with Chris Gratien and Emily Neumeier. Special thanks to our friends at Muhtelif for the intro music. "The Visual Past” is a podcast series curated by Emily Neumeier and Ünver Rüstem. It showcases the latest research by scholars who explore the visual, spatial, and material culture that shaped the Ottoman world. The series will address not only objects, images, and calligraphy, but also works of architecture that were themselves contexts for other media. Before being designated historical landmarks or enshrined in museum displays, these rich artistic and architectural products constituted an intrinsic part of Ottoman life, intersecting with and affecting all levels of society. Episodes in this series investigate crucial issues about sight and seeing in the Ottoman Empire, including the power of the gaze, the depiction of human and animal imagery, and questions of style, aesthetics, and patronage. The series also explores transformations in technology that opened up new possibilities during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries for the popular dissemination of images through photographs, print media, and film.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 26 Minutes 30 Apr 2016

E243 | Although artistic production occurs in a political context, art and politics are often studied as separate fields of historical inquiry. Our guest in this episode, Dr. Sarah-Neel Smith, offers a reflection on the close relationship between art and politics in Turkey through a discussion of her research on the figure of Bülent Ecevit. As a politician, Ecevit is remembered for his four stints as Prime Minister of Turkey and his prominent positions in the Republican People's Party (CHP) and later in the Democratic Left Party (DSP). Yet during the early years of his career, Ecevit was also extremely active in intellectual pursuits as a writer and art critic. In this episode, Dr. Smith explores the intellectual life of Bülent Ecevit and the link between debates about art and culture and the development of democratic politics in Turkey during the 1950s. Sarah-Neel Smith is Assistant Professor in the Department of Art History, Theory, and Criticism at the Maryland Institute College of Art. Her work focuses on art of the modern Middle East, modernism in a global and comparative perspective, and histories of museums, exhibitions, and display. Her current book project, Art, Democracy, and the Culture of Dissent in 1950s Turkey, focuses on the intersection of art and politics in Turkey and the ways that local art galleries, painting practices, and art criticism were informed by international discourses about democracy after WWII. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/04/art-and-politics-in-1950s-turkey.html Nicholas Danforth holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the history and historiography of modern Turkey. In addition to currently serving as senior political analyst at the Bipartisan Policy Center, he is creator and editor of The Afternoon Map blog. CREDITS Episode No. 243 Release Date: 29 April 2016 Recording Location: Washington, DC Editing and production by Chris Gratien Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro music Sound excerpts: Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Images and bibliography courtesy of Sarah-Neel Smith. . .

  Direct Link   Download 45 Minutes 27 Apr 2016

E242 | “Hrig,” the Moroccan Arabic term for “illegal” immigration, translates to “burning.” In the latest episode of Tajine, Isabella Alexander discusses the dramatic rise in sub-Saharan migrants attempting to enter the E.U. from Morocco - now the primary entry point for all African migrations north. As Spanish officials start exploring their border controls further south in response, hundreds of thousands of sub-Saharans now find themselves trapped in Morocco. Their act of “burning” signifies the literal burning of their identification papers to avoid repatriation when arrested by European authorities, but also the symbolic burning of their pasts in hopes of a better future abroad. They wait in sprawling slums outside of Moroccan cities, scraping together enough money to attempt the journey into Spain by boat or by land once again. But, what happens when their position in this liminal space—Morocco—becomes a permanent one? Anthropological studies of migration have long been situated in migrants’ sending or receiving communities, but saturated labor markets in traditional immigrant-receiving countries like those across the E.U. have led to less permeable borders and migration routes are changing. In this podcast, Dr. Alexander urges us to question what “the burning” means for the rapidly expanding population of sub-Saharan migrants in Morocco. We discuss Morocco’s response to the crisis, its current relations with the E.U., and what daily life looks like for these men, women, and children trapped in between two worlds. Finally, we draw some parallels between Morocco and the unfolding migration and refugee crises throughout the Mediterranean. Isabella Alexander is an anthropologist and filmmaker. She earned her Ph.D. from Emory University in 2016 with a dissertation entitled “Burning at the E.U. Border: Liminality, Belonging, and Morocco’s New Migrant Class.” She also holds a B.A. from New York University, a M.F.A. from Speos Institut de la Photographie, and a M.A. from the University of Chicago. She is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Dept. of Anthropology at Emory and is currently working on a documentary film entitled “The Burning: An Untold Story from the Other Side of the Migrant Crisis.” (http://www.theburning.org/). Graham H. Cornwell is a PhD Candidate in History at Georgetown University. His dissertation is entitled "Sweetening the Pot: A History of Tea and Taste in Morocco, 1856-1960." CREDITS Episode No. 242 (tajine No. 11) Release Date: 27 April 2016 Recording Location: Princeton University Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Turnalar Turnalar - Darulelhan Heyeti Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the outro music Images and bibliography courtesy of Isabella Alexander More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/04/migrants-refugees-morocco.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 49 Minutes 21 Apr 2016

E241 | During World War I, the Lazarist college at Antoura, in the mountains of Mt. Lebanon north of Beirut, was taken over by Cemal Pasha to be used as an orphanage for Armenian and Kurdish orphans. Turkish feminist Halide Edip recounts in her memoirs that the time she spent as director of the orphanage during the war was among the happiest periods of her life. In this episode, Professor Selim Deringil discusses his new project, a film about the Antoura orphanage and its orphans during the war, painting a very different picture from that which emerges from Edip's memoirs. The film, entitled "After This Day," is produced and directed by Nigol Bezjian. View a trailer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PS_qoAHeRrI Selim Deringil is Professor of History in the Humanities Department at the Lebanese American University in Beirut, Lebanon. He is the author of numerous books and articles on Ottoman History, including The Well Protected Domains (1998) and Conversion and Apostasy in the Late Ottoman Empire (2012). Susanna Ferguson is a Ph.D. Candidate in Middle Eastern History at Columbia University. She is currently working on a dissertation entitled "Tracing Tarbiya: Women, Gender and Childrearing in Egypt and Lebanon, 1865-1939." Matthew Ghazarian is a Ph.D. student in Columbia University's Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, African Studies. His research focuses on the intersections of sectarianism, humanitarianism, and political economy in central and eastern Anatolia between 1856 and 1893. CREDITS Episode No. 241 Release Date: 21 April 2016 Recording Location: Beirut Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Turnalar Turnalar - Darulelhan Heyeti; Murat Kenarinda - Agyazar Efendi; Bozlak and Halay - Yozgatli Hafiz Suleyman Bey More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/04/antoura.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 39 Minutes 16 Apr 2016

E240 | What is a caliphate? Who can be caliph? What is the history of the idea? How can we interpret and use it today? In this podcast we discuss with Prof Hugh Kennedy his forthcoming book The Caliphate (Pelican Books) and the long-term historical context to the idea of caliphate. Tracing the history from the choosing of the first caliph Abu Bakr in the immediate aftermath of the Prophet Muhammad’s death in 632, the Orthodox (Rashidun) caliphs (632-661), the Umayyads (661-750), the Abbasids (750-1258) and the use of the idea of caliphate by the Ottomans down to the emergence of another Abu Bakr as “caliph” of the IS in 2014. Hugh Kennedy is Professor of Arabic at SOAS, London. He has been studying the history of the caliphate for almost fifty years and has written numerous books including “The Courts of the Caliphs” (2004) and “The Great Arab Conquests” (2007). Taylan Güngör is a doctoral candidate at SOAS in London. His interests are in Medieval and Pre-Modern Eastern Mediterranean trading circles and his research is on trade in Istanbul after 1453. CREDITS Episode No. 240 Release Date: 15 April 2016 Recording Location: School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) Audio Editing by Taylan Güngör Recorded at SOAS Radio studios. SOAS Radio is an outlet for creative media and talent housed by the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. Run by alumni, current students and staff at the School, including volunteers from like-minded communities, SOAS Radio is dedicated to varied and original programming on world music, culture and current affairs. Special thanks to Lâmekân Ensemble for intro and outro music For an extensive bibliography: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/04/caliphate.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 48 Minutes 11 Apr 2016

E239 | Were Ottoman courts just? Boğaç Ergene discusses this basic question in this podcast by forging a new path beyond the earlier views of the justice system as inherently fickle and capricious—immortalized in Weber’s concept of kadijustiz—and the idealistic views of Ottoman courts as a site of equal and fair treatment for all. Drawing on the results of research for his forthcoming publication with Metin Coşgel entitled The Economics of Ottoman Justice, Ergene argues for employing the quantitative methods of “law and economics” scholars, demonstrating that entrenched power holders in early modern Ottoman society were always able to use the Ottoman court system to produce outcomes favorable to themselves. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/04/economics-and-justice-in-ottoman-courts.html Boğaç A. Ergene (PhD in History, 2001, Ohio State University) has undergraduate and graduate degrees in Economics, Economic History, and History and is currently Associate Professor of History at University of Vermont. He is the author of Local Court, Provincial Society and Justice in the Ottoman Empire (Brill, 2003) and editor of Judicial Practice: Institutions and Agents in the Islamic World (Brill, 2009). His most recent monograph, The Economics of Ottoman Justice, coauthored with Metin Coşgel, is forthcoming from the Cambridge University Press. Nir Shafir is a historian of the Middle East whose research examines the intersections of knowledge production, religious practice, and material culture in the early modern world (1400-1800). He curates Ottoman History Podcast’s series on history of science in addition to being one of the co-founders of hazine.info, a website that explores the archives and libraries of the Islamic world. He is currently an advanced doctoral candidate in the History Department at UCLA. CREDITS Episode No. 239 Release Date: 11 April 2016 Recording Location: Cambridge, MA Editing and production by Chris Gratien Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro and outro music Sound excerpts: Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Muzaffer Akgun - Ha Bu Diyar; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Rizeli Sadik - Erkek Kadin Oyun Havasi Podcast image by Daphne Christoforou, copyright Boğaç Ergene Bibliography courtesy of Boğaç Ergene More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/04/economics-and-justice-in-ottoman-courts.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 48 Minutes 09 Apr 2016

E238 | The First World War and the fall of the Ottoman Empire are defining moments in the political history of the modern Middle East. This narrative is usually told through the lenses of the breakup of empire, the successes and failures of national movements, and the colonial involvement of British and French Mandates in the region. In this episode, Keith Watenpaugh offers a different approach to this story through a critical look at the role of American humanitarian organizations such as Near East Relief admist the war and its aftermath, which is the subject of his new monograph entitled Bread From Stones (UC Press, 2015). In the podcast, we discuss how the massive displacement of the First World War, the Armenian genocide, and the need to care for refugees in the postwar Middle East contributed to the evolution of aid and charity organizations and the creation of what scholars see as modern humanitarian structures and ideologies. Prof. Watenpaugh describes how Americans came to see their unique humanitarian relationship with Armenians and other communities in the Middle East, and we discuss how the historical study of humanitarianism as an ideology in its own right changes not only the historiography of the region but also the way we think about present-day humanitarian crises. Keith David Watenpaugh is Professor and Director of the University of California, Davis Human Rights Studies Program. A UCLA-trained historian, he is author of Bread from Stones: The Middle East and the Making of Modern Humanitarianism (California, 2015) and Being Modern in the Middle East (Princeton, 2006) and articles in the American Historical Review, Social History, International Journal of Middle East Studies, Journal of Human Rights, Humanity, Chronicle of Higher Education, Ayrıntı Dergi, Jadaliyya & Huffington Post. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. CREDITS Episode No. 238 Release Date: 8 April 2016 Recording Location: Middle East Studies Association 2016 Meeting in Denver, CO Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Egil Daglar Ustunden Asam - Viktoriya Hanim; Murat Kenarinda - Agyazar Efendi Images via Library of Congress More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/04/humanitarianism-middle-east.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 45 Minutes 08 Apr 2016

E237 | *Bonus Episode* In comparison with the historiography of other world regions, class has often been an ignored aspect of the history of the late Ottoman Empire and modern Middle East. This has been especially true with regard to the middle class. But as our guest Keith Watenpaugh has argued in Being Modern in the Middle East, the middle class emerged as a discrete segment of late Ottoman society represented by businessmen, professionals, educators, and writers who engaged robustly with ideas concerning modernity and nationalism and contributed greatly to the making of post-Ottoman societies. In this interview, Prof. Watenpaugh reflects on his research regarding Ottoman and post-Ottoman Aleppo and the historiography of modernity and class in the Middle East roughly a decade after Being Modern's publication, and we explore possible directions for further inquiry. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/04/middle-class-middle-east.html Keith David Watenpaugh is Professor and Director of the University of California, Davis Human Rights Studies Program. A UCLA-trained historian, he is author of Bread from Stones: The Middle East and the Making of Modern Humanitarianism (California, 2015) and Being Modern in the Middle East (Princeton, 2006) and articles in the American Historical Review, Social History, International Journal of Middle East Studies, Journal of Human Rights, Humanity, Chronicle of Higher Education, Ayrıntı Dergi, Jadaliyya & Huffington Post. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. CREDITS Episode No. 237 Release Date: 8 April 2016 Recording Location: Aynalıçeşme, Istanbul Editing and production by Chris Gratien Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro music Sound excerpts: Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Image via Library of Congress. . .

  Direct Link   Download 35 Minutes 07 Apr 2016

E236 | Non-Muslim communities of the Middle East were intimately involved in the rise of constitutional politics that occurred in both the Ottoman Empire and Iran during the early 20th century. But to what extent were their interests represented in the emerging parliaments of revolutionary constitutional governments? In this episode, Saghar Sadeghian discusses her research on the representation of non-Muslim communities of Iran such as Jews, Armenians, Zoroastrians, and Baha'is during the early years of constitutionalism from 1906 to 1911. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/04/non-muslims-iran.html Saghar Sadeghian is the Henry Hart Rice Family Foundation Fellow and Lecturer at the MacMillan Center. Her research focuses on the ideas of nationality, constitution, and modern institutions in Iran, Iraq, and Afghanistan during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. She is specifically interested in minority groups in the Middle East and the question of gender, race, religion and ethnicity. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. CREDITS Episode No. 236 Release Date: 7 April 2016 Recording Location: Yale University Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Seyfettin Sucu - Eğin Türküsü (digitized by Chris Gratien); Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Image via Iran Review Bibliography courtesy of Saghar Sadeghian Bibliography and more at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/04/non-muslims-iran.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 45 Minutes 03 Apr 2016

E235 | The linguistic landscape of Mandate Palestine was highly complex. Arabic and other languages of the former Ottoman Empire were joined by the wide array of tongues spoken by Jewish immigrants as well as English, the language of Palestine's new British governors. As our guest Liora Halperin demonstrates in her book Babel in Zion (Yale University Press), this linguistic diversity appeared to be an existential threat to those within the Zionist movement who hoped to see Jewish community of Mandate Palestine united by a newly-revived Hebrew language. Yet linguistic pluralism was not seen as a threat by all, and other camps championed other agendas through language politics. In this episode, we discuss Dr. Halperin's research concerning language politics and the legacy of Mandate Palestine's period of linguistic pluralism. Liora R. Halperin is an Assistant Professor of History and Jewish Studies and the Endowed Professor of Israel/Palestine Studies at the University of Colorado Boulder. She received her M.A. and Ph.D. in History from UCLA in 2011 and her B.A from Harvard. Her research focuses on Jewish cultural history, Jewish-Arab relations in Ottoman and Mandate Palestine, language ideology and policy, and the politics surrounding nation formation in Palestine in the years leading up to the creation of the State of Israel in 1948. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. Erin Hutchinson is a PhD candidate in History at Harvard University focusing on the social and cultural history of the Soviet Union after the death of Stalin. Her dissertation project explores how intellectuals of rural origins, especially those from Moldova, Russia, Ukraine, and Armenia, sought to transform cultural understandings of the nation in the second half of the twentieth century. Polina Ivanova is a Ph.D. Candidate at Harvard University and a 2016-18 Tyler Fellow at Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection. Her interests include history of the medieval Mediterranean, Anatolia and Iran, as well as archaeology and material culture studies. CREDITS Episode No. 235 Release Date: 3 April 2016 Recording Location: Cambridge, MA Editing and production by Chris Gratien Musical excerpts from archive.org uploaded by fidika: Egil Daglar Ustunden Asam - Viktoriya Hanim; Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Images and bibliography courtesy of Liora Halperin Images and bibliography at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/04/language-palestine.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 40 Minutes 27 Mar 2016

E234 | Ottoman History Podcast'in bu bölümünde, Mimar Sinan Güzel Sanatlar Üniversitesi Sosyoloji Bölümü'nden tarihçi Burak Onaran ile yemeğin ve mutfağın siyasi ve toplumsal tarihini konuşuyoruz. Son dönem Osmanlı İmparatorluğu'nda kamu diplomasisi açısından Osmanlı mutfağını nasıl okuyabiliriz? Osmanlı mutfağından Türk mutfağına geçiş, mutfağın ve yemeğin ulusallaşması süreci nasıl gerçekleşmiştir? Cumhuriyet'in kuruluşundan 1970'lere Türkiye'deki mutfak kültüründe nasıl bir değişim yaşanmıştır? Bu podcastte, bu soruların yanıtlarını arıyoruz. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/03/yemegin-politik-tarihi.html Burak Onaran Mimar Sinan Güzel Sanatlar Üniversitesi, Sosyoloji Bölümü öğretim üyesidir. Doktorasını 2009 yılında EHESS-Paris’te (Ecole des hautes études en science sociales), Tarih Bölümünde tamamladı. XIX. yüzyıl Osmanlı ve Erken Cumhuriyet dönemi siyasal ve toplumsal tarihinin yanı sıra, mutfak kültürünün olitik veçheleri ve historiyografi çalışma konuları arasındadır. Ufuk Adak University of Cincinnati'den Tarih doktorası aldı. Doktora tezi, son dönem Osmanlı İmparatorluğu'nda doğu Akdeniz liman kentlerindeki sosyal ve politik dönüşümü suç, ceza, sosyal kontrol ve hapishaneler üzerinden ele almaktadır. Adak, Berlin'de Zentrum Moderner Orient'te (ZMO) doktora sonrası araştırmalarda bulunmuştur. YAPIM VE YAYIN Bölüm No. 234 Yayın Tarihi: 25 Mart 2016 Kayıt Yeri: Istanbul Ses Editörü: Onur Engin (Koç Üniversitesi ve Dr. Nina Ergin'in danışmanlığı'nda asistanlık desteği ile hazırlanmıştır.) Müzik (archive.org): Muzeyyen Senar - Bu aksam gun batarken gel Görseller ve kaynakça: Burak Onaran'ın müsadesiyle: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/03/yemegin-politik-tarihi.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 42 Minutes 23 Mar 2016

E233 | At the heart of medieval political economies were a variety of practices, structures, and activities that revolved around the production and distribution of food. In this episode, Nicolas Trépanier discusses his research for Foodways and Daily Life in Medieval Anatolia, which examines life in the early Ottoman Empire through the lens of food and drink. We discuss diverse subjects from agrarian labor and temporality to religion and commerce in order to understand how people lived through what and how they ate. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/03/food-medieval-anatolia.html PARTICIPANTS Nicolas Trépanier is Associate Professor of History at the University of Mississippi and the author of Foodways and Daily Life in Medieval Anatolia: A New Social History (University of Texas Press, 2014). His current research focuses on landscape and perceptions of place in the late medieval Anatolian countryside. Nir Shafir is a historian of the Middle East whose research examines the intersections of knowledge production, religious practice, and material culture in the early modern world (1400-1800). He curates Ottoman History Podcast’s series on history of science in addition to being one of the co-founders of hazine.info, a website that explores the archives and libraries of the Islamic world. He is currently an advanced doctoral candidate in the History Department at UCLA. Polina Ivanova is a Ph.D. Candidate at Harvard University and a 2016-18 Tyler Fellow at Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection. Her interests include history of the medieval Mediterranean, Anatolia and Iran, as well as archaeology and material culture studies. CREDITS Episode No. 233 Release Date: 22 March 2016 Recording Location: Cambridge, MA Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Image and bibliography courtesy of Nicolas Trépanier Bibliography at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/03/food-medieval-anatolia.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 41 Minutes 18 Mar 2016

E232 | Starting in the fifteenth century, medical doctors from the Italian peninsula began accompanying Venetian consular missions to cities in the Mamluk and Ottoman empires. These doctors treated not only Venetian consular officials, but also local artisans and rulers. In this podcast, Valentina Pugliano discusses the experiences of these travelling doctors both in the Italian peninsula and in the Middle East. We explore their interactions with the local population and their effect on the medical ecology of the Middle East as well as the sources we use to write such histories. Together, the experiences of these doctors point to the connected histories of medicine and science in the early modern Mediterranean. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/03/venetian-doctors-in-ottoman-empire.html Valentina Pugliano is a Wellcome Trust Research Fellow and JRF at Cambridge University. Her research explores the participation of artisans in fashioning natural history in early modern Italy and histories of Venetian medicine and science in the eastern Mediterranean. Nir Shafir is a historian of the Middle East whose research examines the intersections of knowledge production, religious practice, and material culture in the early modern world (1400-1800). He curates Ottoman History Podcast’s series on history of science in addition to being one of the co-founders of hazine.info, a website that explores the archives and libraries of the Islamic world. He is currently an advanced doctoral candidate in the History Department at UCLA. CREDITS Episode No. 232 Release Date: 18 March 2016 Recording Location: San Francisco, CA Editing by Onur Engin (funded by a paid assistantship at Koç University under the supervision of Nina Ergin) Production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts via imingigong on archive.org: Scarlatti Domenico-(Keyboard)Piano Sonata K.116 (L.452) in C minor (Allegro), Andras Schiff (Piano); Scarlatti Domenico-(Keyboard)Piano Sonata K.105 (L.204) in G major (Allego), John Browning (Piano). Image "Jan van Grevenbroeck (1731-1807), Venetian doctor during the time of the plague" via Wikipedia. . .

  Direct Link   Download 40 Minutes 15 Mar 2016

E231 | During the late Ottoman period, the Syrian Protestant College in Beirut became a leading center of higher education in the Eastern Mediterranean and for the Arab world in particular. With the establishment of British and French Mandates in the Middle East following the First World War, the Syrian Protestant College--now known as the American University of Beirut--became an educational hub not only for the Arab elite and middle class but also for local teachers and bureaucrats that would serve in the colonial mandate governments. In this episode, Hilary Falb Kalisman shares her research on the history of scholarship students from the British Mandates and their life at AUB during the interwar period, highlighting dimensions of class, nation, and transnationalism that emerged out of the educational experience and tracing the impacts of their education as they returned to serve in mandate and post-mandate independent governments of Iraq, Palestine, and Transjordan. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/03/AUB-british-mandate.html Hilary Falb Kalisman is currently a visiting Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard University. She completed her PhD at the University of California-Berkeley in May 2015. Her research focuses on education in the Middle East during the Mandate period. Huma Gupta is a Ph.D. student at the Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture (AKPIA) at MIT. Her dissertation research focuses on the structural relationships between urban planning, architecture, state formation and migration in modern Iraq. She is also interested in the sonic and visual past and continues to think of ways to integrate sensory histories into her research. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. Nir Shafir is a historian of the Middle East whose research examines the intersections of knowledge production, religious practice, and material culture in the early modern world (1400-1800). He curates Ottoman History Podcast’s series on history of science in addition to being one of the co-founders of hazine.info, a website that explores the archives and libraries of the Islamic world. He is currently an advanced doctoral candidate in the History Department at UCLA. CREDITS Episode No. 231 Release Date: 15 March 2016 Recording Location: Cambridge, MA Editing and production by Chris Gratien Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro and outro music Sound excerpts for archive.org: Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Images via Library of Congress and Before Their Diaspora Bibliography courtesy of Hilary Falb Kalisman. . .

  Direct Link   Download 50 Minutes 12 Mar 2016

E230 | In this episode, Ellen Fleischmann and Christine Lindner discuss the history of women and gender and the American Protestant Mission in Lebanon. How did American missionary women experience and transform the American Protestant project in the Levant in the 19th and 20th centuries? How did American missionaries, both women and men, interact with women from Beirut and Mt. Lebanon, both those who converted and those who did not? And how did these heterogeneous interactions produce new experiences of womanhood, family, power, and authority in the Levant? Drs. Fleischmann and Lindner reflect on these questions based on their considerable research in Lebanon and elsewhere, and also share their thoughts about sources and strategies for tracing women's history and missionary history in the Ottoman and post-Ottoman Levant. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/03/women-missionaries-lebanon.html Ellen Fleischmann is Professor of History and Humanities Chair at the University of Dayton in Dayton, Ohio. She is the author of The Nation and Its 'New' Women: the Palestinian Women's Movement, 1920-1948 (2003) as well as numerous articles. Christine Lindner served as the inaugural director of the Preserving Protestant Heritage in the Middle East project at the Near East School of Theology in Beirut, Lebanon. She obtained her Ph.D. from the University of Edinburgh in 2009 and has published a number of articles on the history of Protestantism in Ottoman Syria. Susanna Ferguson is a Ph.D. Candidate in Middle Eastern History at Columbia University. She is currently working on a dissertation entitled "Tracing Tarbiya: Women, Gender and Childrearing in Egypt and Lebanon, 1865-1939." CREDITS Episode No. 230 Release Date: 12 March 2016 Recording Location: American University in Beirut, Lebanon Audio editing by Onur Engin (funded by a paid assistantship at Koç University under the supervision of Nina Ergin) Production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts from archive.org: Recep Birgit - Olmaz ilac sine-i sad-pareme; Filiz Şatıroğlu - Safvet-i askim bilip ey gul-tenim Image courtesy of Christine Lindner, The Playground-Beirut Seminary for Girls,” The Church at Home and Abroad 18:12 (December 1894), 493.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 48 Minutes 08 Mar 2016

E229 | Scholars have long neglected the Middle East’s Christian communities in general and Christian women in particular. In this episode, Akram Khater draws attention to the biography of Hindiyya al-'Ujaimi (1720-1798) to explore the religious and political upheavals of 18th-century Aleppo and Mount Lebanon. Hindiyya’s story speaks to the dynamic history of the Maronite Church, the fraught encounter between Arab and European Christianities, and the role of faith as a historical force. For half a century, she held as much sway over the Maronite Church as any other cleric. The extent of her influence won her powerful enemies in Lebanon and the Vatican. Hindiyya weathered one inquisition but was eventually convicted of heresy and confined to a solitary cell for the final decade of her life. The story of her ascent and demise illuminates gendered aspects of piety and politics in the Christian Middle East. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/03/hindiyya.html Akram Fouad Khater is University Faculty Scholar, Professor of History, and holds the Khayrallah Chair in Diaspora Studies at North Carolina State University, where he also serves as the Director of the Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies. He is the author of many publications, including two monographs, Inventing Home: Emigration, Gender and the Making of a Lebanese Middle Class, 1861-1921 (2001) and Embracing the Divine: Passion and Politics in the Christian Middle East (2014). Akram Khater is the current editor of the International Journal of Middle East Studies. Graham Auman Pitts is a PhD Candidate in Georgetown University's History department, where he studies the environmental history of the modern Middle East. He is currently finishing a dissertation entitled "Fallow Fields: Famine and the Making of Lebanon (1914-1952)," which probes the intersections of ecology, capital, and colonialism. CREDITS Episode No. 229 Release Date: 8 March 2016 Recording Location: North Carolina State University Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts from archive.org uploaded by fidika: Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Ben Yemenimi Al Isterim - Hafiz Burhan; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Nazmiye - Rizeli Sadik; Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla Image courtesy of Akram Fouad Khater. . .

  Direct Link   Download 43 Minutes 04 Mar 2016

E228 | The conventional story of the 1908 Revolution in the Ottoman Empire is that of the Young Turks and a multi-confessional alliance of political parties usurping the authoritarian rule of Sultan Abdul Hamid II. The learned class of Muslim notables, the ulema, are usually portrayed as apprehensive bystanders threatened with marginalization by the restoration of the Ottoman constitution. But as our guest Yakoob Ahmed explains, ulema engagement with the revolution and the parliamentary elections that followed was robust. In this episode, we explore that engagement through a discussion of the writings and activities of the Ottoman ulema during the transformative period of 1908-1912. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/03/ulema-1908-revolution.html Yakoob Ahmed is a final year Ph.D. student at SOAS. His thesis, in which he is writing and revising narratives of the ulema’s role in the late Ottoman Empire, is titled the ‘The Role of the Ottoman Sunni Ulema in the Parliamentary Elections of 1908–1912’. Yakoob has previously been a research fellow at Istanbul Şehir University in Istanbul and has a interest in nineteenth and twentieth century Islamic intellectual thought. Taylan Güngör is a doctoral candidate at SOAS in London. His interests are in Medieval and Pre-Modern Eastern Mediterranean trading circles and his research is on trade in Istanbul after 1453. CREDITS Episode No. 228 Release Date: 4 March 2016 Recording Location: School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) Audio Editing by Taylan Güngör Recorded at SOAS Radio studios. SOAS Radio is an outlet for creative media and talent housed by the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. Run by alumni, current students and staff at the School, including volunteers from like-minded communities, SOAS Radio is dedicated to varied and original programming on world music, culture and current affairs. Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro and outro music Image "Member of Turkish Parliament in chamber" via Library of Congress. . .

  Direct Link   Download 40 Minutes 29 Feb 2016

E227 | During the late eighteenth century, a series of volcanic eruptions at a site called Laki in Iceland created climatic effects that spanned the entire globe. In this episode, Alan Mikhail shares his research on the impacts of these eruptions on the agrarian economy of Ottoman Egypt through an explanation of the localized climatic and environmental effects of Laki on the Nile River. We discuss how climatic events shape or accelerate historical processes and explore how climate history can serve as a means of thinking about unseen connections between different world regions. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/02/ottoman-iceland.html Alan Mikhail is Professor of History at Yale University. He is the author of The Animal in Ottoman Egypt (New York: Oxford University Press, 2014) and Nature and Empire in Ottoman Egypt (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011) and editor of Water on Sand: Environmental Histories of the Middle East and North Africa (New York: Oxford University Press, 2013). Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. CREDITS Episode No. 227 Release Date: 29 February 2016 Recording Location: Yale University Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Kara Güneş - Istanbul; Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Turnalar Turnalar - Darulelhan Heyeti Image "Lava fjelds in Iceland" via Library of Congress Map courtesy of Alan Mikhail and Stacey Maples Bibliography courtesy of Alan Mikhail See Alan Mikhail. "Ottoman Iceland: A Climate History". Environmental History. 20, no. 2 (2015): 262-284.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 37 Minutes 25 Feb 2016

E226 | Events such as earthquakes, floods, and epidemics provide vivid illustrations of the natural world's impact on human society, but the outcomes of natural disasters also offer a window onto aspects of social and political life in past societies. In this episode, Yaron Ayalon discusses his research on natural disasters in the Ottoman Empire and what such events tell us about Ottoman state and society during the early modern period. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/02/natural-disasters-ottoman-empire.html Yaron Ayalon is Assistant Professor of History at Ball State University. He is a social and environmental historian of the Ottoman Empire, the early modern Middle East, and Sephardic Jewry. Ayalon has published numerous articles on Ottoman and Jewish history. He received his BA in education and Middle East history from Tel Aviv University in 2002, and his Ph.D. in Near Eastern Studies from Princeton in 2009. For Natural Disasters in the Ottoman Empire: Plague, Famine, and Other Misfortunes, see http://www.cambridge.org/bm/academic/subjects/history/middle-east-history/natural-disasters-ottoman-empire-plague-famine-and-other-misfortunes?format=HB Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. CREDITS Episode No. 226 Release Date: 25 February 2016 Recording Location: Middle East Studies Association 2016 Meeting in Denver, CO Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Image "1556 Istanbul Earthquake by Herman Gall" via Wikipedia Bibliography courtesy of Yaron Ayalon. . .

  Direct Link   Download 36 Minutes 20 Feb 2016

E225 | As research on the early modern period increasingly shows, bubonic plague played a formative role in the making of state policies and medical practice, and concern over plague created new connections between different regions of the Mediterranean. In this episode, Edna Bonhomme joins us again to talk about her research on plague in North Africa, its relationship with the issue of the global slave trade, and the ways in which experimenting with plague became a practice among Europeans residing in 18th-century Egypt. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/02/plague-in-egypt.html Edna Bonhomme is a doctoral candidate in History of Science at Princeton University. Her dissertation focuses on the history of the bubonic plague in Cairo and Tunis during the outbreaks in the 1780s and 1790s. She graduated from Reed College in 2006 with a degree in Biology and from Columbia University with a master's in public health. Prior to pursuing history, she was a research assistant at the Oregon Health and Sciences University. In addition to academic work, she occasionally writes for Socialist Worker and Red Wedge Magazine. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. He is currently preparing a monograph about the environmental history of the Cilicia region from the 1850s until the 1950s. CREDITS Episode No. 225 Release Date: 20 February 2016 Recording Location: Manhattan, NY Editing and production by Chris Gratien Special thanks to Kara Güneş for allowing us to use the composition "Istanbul" in the intro and outro music Sound excerpts: Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep. Additional thanks to Susanna Ferguson Image via Library of Congress Bibliography courtesy of Edna Bonhomme. . .

  Direct Link   Download 40 Minutes 10 Feb 2016

E224 | Ondokuzuncu yüzyılda Osmanlı merkezi yönetimi vergi gelirlerini nasıl ve hangi koşullarda arttırabilmişti? Bu vergi artışının toplumsal ve siyasal bedeli ne olmuştu? Bu podcastimizde, Prof. Dr. Nadir Özbek ile son dönem Osmanlı İmparatorluğu'nda vergi siyaseti ve toplumsal adaleti konuşuyoruz. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/02/osmanlda-vergi.html Prof. Dr. Nadir Özbek, Boğaziçi Üniversitesi Atatürk Enstitüsü'nde öğretim üyesidir. University of Cincinnati Tarih bölümünden doktorasını alan Ufuk Adak, Osmanlı İmparatorluğu’nun son dönemindeki ceza politikaları ve hapishaneler üzerine uzmanlaşmıştır. Zoe Griffith, Brown Üniversitesi'nde erken modern Akdeniz tarihi üzerine doktorasını yapmaktadır. YAPIM VE YAYIN Bölüm No. 224 Yayın Tarihi: 10 Şubat 2016 Kayıt Yeri: Boğaziçi Üniversitesi Ses Editörü: Onur Engin (Koç Üniversitesi ve Dr. Nina Ergin'in danışmanlığı'nda asistanlık desteği ile hazırlanmıştır.) Müzik (archive.org): Müzeyyen Senar - Fikrimin İnce Gülü Bibiliyografya Nadir Özbek müsadesiyle Resim kaynağı: Başbakanlık Osmanlı Arşivi. . .

  Direct Link   Download 40 Minutes 30 Jan 2016

E223 | We often speak of physical and abstract worlds as if they were self-evident. But the concept of "the world" has been forged and continually remade through imagination and debate. In this podcast, Ayesha Ramachandran discusses the historical context of the world's ascendance as a meaningful concept and offers a preview of her new book entitled Worldmakers: Global Imagining in Early Modern Europe. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/01/worldmakers.html Ayesha Ramachandran is Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature at Yale University, where she focuses on the literature and culture of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, primarily on Europe’s relations with an expanding world. She previously taught at Stony Brook University and is a former Junior Fellow of the Harvard Society of Fellows. CREDITS Episode No. 223 Release Date: 30 January 2016 Recording Location: Yale University Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts from Lâmekân Ensemble - Karcığar Köçekçeler; Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer Image via Wikipedia Reading list courtesy of Ayesha Ramachandran This episode is part of an ongoing series entitled History of Science, Ottoman or Otherwise. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/p/blog-page_18.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 45 Minutes 27 Jan 2016

E222 | In the second half of the sixteenth century, the Ottoman court became particularly invested in writing its own history. This initiative primarily took the form of official chronicles, and the court historian (şehnameci), a new position established in the 1550s, set to work producing manuscripts accompanied by lavish illustrations. However, the paintings in these texts should not be understood merely as passive descriptions of historical events. Rather, these images served as complex conveyors of meaning in their own right, designed by teams of artists to satisfy the aspirations of their patrons, which included not only the sultan but also other members of the court. In this episode, Emily Neumeier and Nir Shafir speak with Emine Fetvacı about these illustrated histories, the subject of her 2013 volume Picturing History at the Ottoman Court. Emine Fetvacı is Associate Professor of Islamic Art at Boston University. In addition to the history of painting, her research currently focuses on the albums of Sultan Ahmed I. She is the author of Picturing History at the Ottoman Court (2013) and the co-editor of Writing History at the Ottoman Court (2013). Thie episode refers to visuals available at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/01/ottoman-painting.html CREDITS Episode No. 222 Release Date: 27 January 2016 Recording Location: Boston University Audio editing by Onur Engin (funded by a paid assistantship at Koç University under the supervision of Nina Ergin) Production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpt: Muzeyyen Senar - Sen Nemsin Ey Dilber (on archive.org) Images via British Library, Harvard Art Museum, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Agha Khan Museum, and Chester Beatty Library. . .

  Direct Link   Download 36 Minutes 24 Jan 2016

E221 | Where did the Ottomans fit within the geographical understandings of Christian kingdoms in early modern Europe? How did Europeans reconcile the notion of "the Turk" as other with the reality of an Ottoman presence in the Balkans and Eastern Europe? What was the relationship between the maps and representations of Ottoman space in Europe and the self-mapping carried out by the Ottomans in maps and miniatures? These are some of the major questions addressed by our guest Palmira Brummett in her new book Mapping the Ottomans, which uses maps to study early modern space and time, travel, the flow of information, claims to sovereignty, and cross-cultural encounters between the Ottomans neighboring Christian polities. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/01/maps-ottoman-empire-europe.html Palmira Brummett is Professor Emerita of History at the University of Tennessee and Visiting Professor of History at Brown University. Her work assesses the rhetorics of cross-cultural interaction in the Ottoman and Mediterranean worlds. CREDITS Episode No. 221 Release Date: 23 January 2016 Recording Location: Providence, RI Editing and production by Chris Gratien Sound excerpts: Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Karaköy Balık Pazarı (recorded by Chris Gratien) Image of Seutter Map of Ottoman Empire, 1730 (via Wikipedia) Additional thanks to Emily Neumeier SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY Aksan, Virginia H., and Daniel Goffman. The Early Modern Ottomans: Remapping the Empire. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Brummett, Palmira Johnson. Mapping the Ottomans: Sovereignty, Territory, and Identity in the Early Modern Mediterranean. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2015. http://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/history/middle-east-history/mapping-ottomans-sovereignty-territory-and-identity-early-modern-mediterranean Dankoff, Robert. An Ottoman Mentality The World of Evliya Çelebi. Leiden: Brill, 2006. Emiralioğlu, M. Pinar. Geographical Knowledge and Imperial Culture in the Early Modern Ottoman Empire. 2014. Fetvacı, Emine. Picturing History at the Ottoman Court. Bloomington & Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2013. Goodrich, Thomas D. Atlas-i Hümayun: A Sixteenth-Century Ottoman Maritime Atlas Discovered in 1984. Wiesbaden: [s.n.], 1987. ______. The Ottoman Turks and the New World: A Study of Tarih-i Hind-i Garbi and Sixteenth-Century Ottoman Americana. Wiesbaden: O. Harrassowitz, 1990. Hagen, Gottfried, Baki Tezcan, and Thomas D. Goodrich. Other places: Ottomans traveling, seeing, writing, drawing the world : essays in honor of Thomas D. Goodrich. 2012. Pinto, Karen C. Medieval Islamic Maps: An Exploration. Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2016. Ramachandran, Ayesha. The Worldmakers: Global Imagining in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2015. Smith, Charlotte Colding. Images of Islam, 1453-1600: Turks in Germany and Central Europe. 2014.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 33 Minutes 12 Jan 2016

E220 | Hundreds of cartographic images of the world and its regions exist scattered throughout collections of medieval and early modern Arabic, Persian, and Turkish manuscripts. The sheer number of these extant maps tells us that from the thirteenth century onward, when these map-manuscripts began to proliferate, visually depicting the world became a major preoccupation of medieval Muslim scholars. However, these cartographers did not strive for mimesis, that is, representation or imitation of the real world. These schematic, geometric, and often symmetrical images of the world are iconographic representations—‘carto-ideographs’—of how medieval Muslim cartographic artists and their patrons perceived their world and chose to represent and disseminate this perception. In this podcast, we sit down with Karen Pinto to discuss the maps found in the cartographically illustrated Kitāb al-Masālik wa-al-Mamālik (Book of Routes and Realms) tradition, which is the first known geographic atlas of maps, its influence on Ottoman cartography, and how basic versions of these carto-ideographs were transported back to villages and far-flung areas of the Islamic empire. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/01/islamic-cartography.html Karen Pinto is Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Boise State University. She specializes in the history of Islamic cartography and its intersections between Ottoman, European, and other world cartographic traditions CREDITS Episode No. 220 Release Date: 12 January 2016 Recording Location: Brown University Editing by Onur Engin (funded by a paid assistantship at Koç University under the supervision of Nina Ergin) Music and sound samples: Bekir Sıdkı - Lerzan ediyor ruhumu cesmindeki efsun; BBC Sound Effects Vol.46 - Istanbul; Selma Sağbaş - Cok surmedi gecti tarab-i sevk-i baharim Images courtesy of Leiden University Library SELECT PUBLICATIONS OF KAREN PINTO Medieval Islamic Maps: An Exploration (in press, The University of Chicago Press, 2016) “Passion and conflict: Medieval Islamic views of the West" in Mapping Medieval Geographies, ed. Keith Lilley, (Cambridge University Press, 2014), 201-224. “Searchin’ his eyes, lookin’ for traces: Piri Reis’ World Map of 1513 & Its Islamic Iconographic Connections (A Reading Through Bağdat 334 and Proust),” Journal of Ottoman Studies, 39:1, 2012, 63-94. "The Maps Are The Message: Mehmet II’s Patronage of an ‘Ottoman Cluster,’" Imago Mundi, 63:2, 2011, 155-179.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 36 Minutes 08 Jan 2016

E219 | Just as the Ottoman Empire is often known for the discourse of Pan-Islam during the 19th century, the Russian Empire is similarly known for its prominent role as the foremost Christian rival of the Ottomans. Yet the long and deep relationship between the Russian Empire and Islam has received comparatively little historical scrutiny. In this podcast, Eileen Kane discusses her recent book entitled Russian Hajj (Cornell University Press), which considers the role of the Russian administrators as rulers over Muslim subjects. We explore how the Russia's relationship with its millions of Muslim subjects transformed during the 19th century and how the Russian Empire became increasingly involved in Muslim matters such as the hajj pilgrimage as it sought to expand its imperial reach. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/01/russian-hajj.html Eileen Kane is Associate Professor of History and Director of the Global Islamic Studies program at Connecticut College. Her research focuses on the historical relationship between Russia and the Middle East. CREDITS Episode No. 219 Release Date: 7 January 2016 Recording Location: Connecticut College Editing and production by Chris Gratien Musical excerpts from archive.org uploaded by fidika: Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Nazmiye - Rizeli Sadik Field recordings of Istanbul by Chris Gratien Image via Library of Congress Bibliography courtesy of Eileen Kane. . .

  Direct Link   Download 91 Minutes 30 Dec 2015

E218 | On August 27, 2015, our dear friend and colleague Vangelis Kechriotis passed away in Istanbul. Vangelis is deeply missed and fondly remembered. He was a historian, a public intellectual, a dedicated teacher, and passionate activist who endeavored to write the history of non-Muslim communities in the Ottoman Empire and to make Istanbul, his adopted home, a place for all of its residents. Never limiting himself to just one community or to an academic audience, Vangelis continuously wrote and spoke in Turkish, Greek, and English in venues from academic journals to television shows to street protests. His concern was the past and present of democracy in Turkey and Greece, and, indeed, throughout the world. To commemorate his life, we collected the memories and thoughts of his friends and colleagues as written texts and audio recordings in the weeks following his death. We also recorded an extended audio interview with some of these colleagues and friends in Istanbul discussing his life, ideals, and accomplishments. What follows are written and oral testimonies in Turkish, English, and Greek of his friendship, activism, and scholarship. We have divided them in two parts. The podcast, interspersed with the aural remembrances, can be accessed through the streaming link. The second part is a PDF document containing written memorials of Vangelis. We are releasing them now, at the end of 2015, as a small tribute to his life. In addition to this, our readers and listeners can find a selected bibliography of Vangelis’s writings and a link to the podcast we recorded with Vangelis about his research two months before his passing. We thank all the people who have contributed to this endeavor. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/12/vangelis.html CREDITS Podcast Panel Lorans Tanatar Baruh, Buket Kitapçı Bayrı, Bülent Bilmez, Polina Ivanova, Paolo Girardelli, Mehmet Kentel, Nilay Özlü, Nir Shafir, Zeynep Türkyılmaz Contributors Şeyma Afacan, Evrim Akbulut, Antonis Anastasopoulos, Feray Coşkun, Buket Coşkuner, Ferdan Ergut, Özge Ertem, Molly Greene, Dimitris Kamouzis, Yusuf Z Karabıçak, Erdem Karaca, Elias Kolovos, Elektra Kostopoulou, Nevra Necipoğlu, Christoph Neumann, Hazal Özdemir, Oya Pancaroğlu, Onur Şar, Amy Singer, Melike Şümertaş, Ece Turnator, Ayla Jean Yackley Episode No. 218 Release Date: 30 December 2015 Recording Location: Koç RCAC Editing and production by Chris Gratien Musical excerpts from archive.org uploaded by fidika: Egil Daglar Ustunden Asam - Viktoriya Hanim; Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla Field recordings of Istanbul by Chris Gratien Bibliography courtesy of Polina Ivanova Images courtesy of Özge Ertem, Nevra Necipoğlu, Onur Şar, Lorans Tanatar Baruh, Melike Şümertaş and Buket Coşkuner More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com. . .

  Direct Link   Download 36 Minutes 17 Dec 2015

E217 | Nearly two centuries ago, Greece achieved its independence from the Ottoman Empire. Yet for centuries before, and for many Greeks even a century after, the story of Greek history was deeply intertwined with that of the Ottoman state, its institutions, and its other subjects. In this episode, we sit down with Molly Greene to discuss her new work on the history of Greeks from the beginning of the Ottoman period into the 18th century, which is a contribution to the The Edinburgh History of the Greeks series. We explore how recent research is changing the picture of the Greek experience of Ottoman rule and the complex relations between state and society throughout the transformation of the imperial structure, and we reflect on the ways in which the history of Ottoman Greeks enriches our understanding of the empire as a whole. Molly Greene is a Professor of History at Princeton University with a joint appointment at the Seeger Center for Hellenic Studies. Her work focuses on the history of the Greeks in the Ottoman Empire. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/12/greeks-in-ottoman-empire-molly-greene.html CREDITS Episode No. 217 Release date: 18 December 2015 Recording Location: Manhattan, NY Editing and production by Chris Gratien Musical excerpts (from archive.org): Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Rizeli Sadik - Erkek Kadin Oyun Havasi Image via Prints at the Map House: https://printsatthemaphouse.files.wordpress.com/ SELECT READING LIST Curta, Florin. The Edinburgh History of the Greeks, C. 500 to 1050 The Early Middle Ages. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2011. Greene, Molly. The Edinburgh History of the Greeks, 1453 to 1768: The Ottoman Empire. 2015. Gallant, Thomas W. The Edinburgh History of the Greeks, 1768 to 1913: The Long Nineteenth Century. 2015. Barkey, Karen. Empire of Difference: The Ottomans in Comparative Perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008. Braude, Benjamin. Christians and Jews in the Ottoman Empire. 2013. Doumanis, Nicholas. Before the Nation: Muslim-Christian Coexistence and Its Destruction in Late Ottoman Anatolia. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Doxiadis, Evdoxios. The Shackles of Modernity: Women, Property, and the Transition from the Ottoman Empire to the Greek State (1750-1850). Cambridge, Mass: Dept. of Classics, Harvard University, 2011. Faroqhi, Suraiya, Vera Costantini, and Markus Koller. Living in the Ottoman ecumenical community: essays in honour of Suraiya Faroqhi. Leiden: Brill, 2008. Kolovous, Elias. Ottoman Empire, the Balkans, the Greek Lands: Towards a Social and Economic History. Piscataway: Gorgias Press, 2010. Papademetriou, Tom. Render Unto the Sultan: Power, Authority, and the Greek Orthodox Church in the Early Ottoman Centuries. 2015. Tezcan, Baki. The Second Ottoman Empire: Political and Social Transformation in the Early Modern World. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 50 Minutes 10 Dec 2015

E216 | Osmanlı edebiyatında ‘halk’ edebiyatı ve ‘divan’ edebiyatı kategorileri homojen midir? Onsekizinci yüzyıl elyazmaları ve bu elyazmalarındaki okuma/okuyucu notları bize neler anlatıyor? Bu podcastte, Elif Sezer ile Osmanlı edebiyatını, yazılı ve sözlü kültür tartışmaları, elyazmaları ve Fîrûzşah hikayesi üzerinden konuşuyoruz. Elif Sezer, İstanbul Şehir Üniversitesi Tarih bölümünde doktora öğrencisi. Osmanlı Erken Modern kültür tarihi çalışmalarını özellikle kitap, okuma tarihi ve okuma pratikleri üzerine yoğunlaşarak devam ettirmektedir. YAPIM VE YAYIN Bölüm No. 216 Yayın Tarihi: 10 December 2015 Kayıt Yeri: Koç RCAC Ses Editörü: Onur Engin (Koç Üniversitesi ve Dr. Nina Ergin'in danışmanlığı'nda asistanlık desteği ile hazırlanmıştır.) Müzik (archive.org): Guler Basu Sen - Yuce dagdan esen ruzgar sevgiliye selam gotur Bibiliyografya ve resim: Elif Sezer'in müsadesiyle (resim: Hikâye-i Fîrûzşâh, Milli Kütüphane, 06 Mil Yz A 1285/1) SEÇME KAYNAKÇA Tülün Değirmenci. “Bir Kitabı Kaç Kişi Okur? Osmanlı’da Okurlar ve Okuma Biçimleri Üzerine Bazı Gözlemler.” Tarih ve Toplum: Yeni Yaklaşımlar, volume 13, 2011, 7-43. Walter J. Ong. Sözlü ve Yazılı Kültür: Sözün Teknolojikleşmesi. İstanbul: Metis, 2014. Nelly Hanna. In Praise of Books: A Cultural History of Cairo’s Middle Class, Sixteenth to Eighteenth Century. New York: Syracuse University Press, 2003. İsmail Erünsal, Osmanlılarda Kütüphaneler ve Kütüphanecilik. İstanbul: Timaş Yayınları, 2015. William L. Hanaway, Jr, Love and War: Adventures from the Firuz Shah Nama of Sheikh Bighami, trans. New York: Persian Heritage Series No. 19, 1974. Mustafa Nihat Özön. Türkçede Roman. İstanbul: Remzi Kitabevi, 1993. Öztürk, Zehra. “Osmanlı Döneminde Kıraat Meclislerinde Okunan Halk Kitapları.” Türkiyat Araştırmaları Literatür Dergisi 5/9, 2007. Reşad Ekrem Koçu. Yeniçeriler. İstanbul: Nurgök Matbaası, 1996.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 42 Minutes 04 Dec 2015

E215 | Note: This podcast refers to visuals available at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/12/tanzimat.html Within Anglophone historiography, the Tanzimat period is conventionally represented as an era of centralizing reforms emanating from the imperial center that represent a trend often labeled as "modernization" or "Westernization." Less attention has been given to what these administrative changes meant in practice and how they were carried out in the different provinces of the Ottoman Empire. In this episode, Cengiz Kırlı discusses his work on various facets of the Tanzimat and its implementation, offering a preview of his new Turkish-language monograph on the "invention of corruption" in the Ottoman Empire and examining the interplay of local and imperial power during an the early Tanzimat period in the Balkans. Cengiz Kırlı is an associate professor at the Ataturk Institute for Modern Turkish History, Boğaziçi University. His research mainly focuses on mid-nineteenth century Ottoman social history. CREDITS Episode No. 215 Release date: 5 December 2015 Location: Boğaziçi University Editing and production by Chris Gratien Musical excerpt Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep Additional sound excerpt Boş Araba (recorded by Chris Gratien) Images courtesy of Cengiz Kırlı Additional thanks to Seçil Yılmaz SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY Kuehn, Thomas. Empire, Islam, and Politics of Difference Ottoman Rule in Yemen, 1849-1919. Leiden: Brill, 2011. Kırlı, Cengiz. Yolsuzluğun icadı: 1840 Ceza kanunu, iktidar, ve bürokrasi. İstanbul: Verita, 2015. ______. “Coffeehouses: Public Opinion in the Nineteenth-Century Ottoman Empire,” in Public Islam and the Common Good, Armando Salvatore and Dale F. Eickelman, eds (Brill, 2004), 75-96. Köksal, Yonca. Local Intermediaries and Ottoman State Centralization: A Comparison of the Tanzimat Reforms in the Provinces of Ankara and Edirne, 1839-1878. 2002. Inalcik, Halil. “Application of the Tanzimat and Its Social Effects”, ArchivumOttomanicum 5 (1973), p. 97-127. İslamoğlu, Huri. "Property as a Contested Domain: A Reevaluation of the Ottoman Land Code of 1858." In New Perspectives on Property and Land, edited by Roger Owen and Martin P. Bunton, 3-61. Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 2001. Maʻoz, Moshe. Ottoman Reform in Syria and Palestine, 1840-1861; The Impact of the Tanzimat on Politics and Society. Oxford: Clarendon P., 1968. Masters, Bruce. "The 1850 Events in Aleppo: An Aftershock of Syria's Incorporation into the Capitalist World System." International Journal of Middle East Studies 22, no. 1 (1990): 3-20. Mundy, Martha, and Richard Saumarez Smith. Governing Property, Making the Modern State Law Administration and Production in Ottoman Syria. London: I.B. Tauris, 2007. Petrov, Milen V. 2004. "Everyday Forms of Compliance: Subaltern Commentaries on Ottoman Reform, 1864-1868". Comparative Studies in Society and History : an International Quarterly.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 47 Minutes 03 Dec 2015

E214 | The city of Istanbul underwent vast transformations over nearly five centuries of Ottoman rule, but it nonetheless retained its place at the center of Ottoman urban life. In this episode, Kate Fleet and Ebru Boyar discuss some of the transformations and continuities that shaped the urban history of Istanbul between 1453 and 1923. Natural disasters, shifting gender relations and practices of health and hygiene, and the presence of the Sultan and his court not only marked Istanbul's urban fabric but also transformed the lives of its people; the way these changes were experienced depended in part on class, gender and occupation. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/11/social-history-istanbul.html Dr. Ebru Boyar is Associate Professor of International Relations at Middle East Technical University. She is the author of A Social History of Ottoman Istanbul, with Kate Fleet (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010), along with many other works on Ottoman social and diplomatic history. Dr. Kate Fleet is Director of the Skilleter Centre for Ottoman Studies at Cambridge University and a Fellow of Newnham College. She is the co-author of A Social History of Ottoman Istanbul, with Ebru Boyar, along with many other works. CREDITS Episode No. 214 Release date: 1 December 2015 Location: Koç RCAC, Istanbul Editing and production by Chris Gratien Music sample from archive.org: Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla Image via Library of Congress Additional thanks to Buket Coşkuner. . .

  Direct Link   Download 61 Minutes 27 Nov 2015

E213 | The urban history of the Ottoman Empire usually deals with subjects pertaining to the imperial capital of Istanbul. But Istanbul was only one of many important urban spaces in the empire. For example, the nearby city of Edirne, which was a significant city throughout the Ottoman period and preceded Istanbul as capital, has received considerably less attention despite its physical and symbolic centrality. In this episode, Amy Singer shares some of her research on the urban, architectural, and socioeconomic history of Edirne across centuries of historical transformation. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/11/edirne.html Amy Singer is professor of Ottoman history at Tel Aviv University. In addition to the city of Edirne, her research currently focuses on the possibilities of creating a trans-Ottoman digital platform for research cooperation and publication. CREDITS Episode No. 213 Release date: 25 November 2015 Location: Koç RCAC, Istanbul Editing and production by Chris Gratien Music samples: Sari Zeybek - Hanende Ibrahim Efendi (fidika on archive.org); Murat Kenarinda - Agyazar Efendi (fidika on archive.org); Muhacir Ibrahim - Tabakçı Roman (vinyl recording by Chris Gratien); Akbil Fever (Chris Gratien); Muhacir Ibarhim - Çöl Kızı (vinyl recording by Chris Gratien) Bibliography courtesy of Amy Singer Image via turkishpostalhistory.com SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY Barkan, Ö.L. “Edirne Askerî Kassamı’na âit Tereke Defterleri.” Belgeler 3 (1966), 1-479. Cinici, Behruz. “The Urban Arrangement of the Selimiye Mosque in Edirne.” Environmental Design 5, no. 5–6 (1987), 86–87. Edirne: Serhattaki Payıtaht. Istanbul: Yapı Kredi Yayınları, 1998. Gökbilgin, M. Tayyib. XV. ve XVI. asırlarda Edirne ve Paşa Livâsı: Vakıflar, Mülkler, Mukataalar. 2007. Istanbul: Üçler Basımevi; İşaret Yayınları, 1952. Inalcik, Halil. “The Conquest of Edirne (1361).” Archivum Ottomanicum 3 (1971), 185–210. Kazancıgil, Ratip. Edirne Mahalleleri Tarihçesi, 1529–1990. Istanbul: Türk Kütüphaneciler Derneği Edirne Şubesi Yayınları, 1992. Kuran, Aptullah. “The Mosque of Yıldırım in Edirne.” Belleten 28 (1964), 428–38. Müderrisoğlu, Fatih. “Edirne II. Bayezid Külliyesi.” Vakıflar Dergisi 22 (1991), 151–98. Necipoğlu, Gülru. The Age of Sinan: Architectural Culture in the Ottoman Empire. Photographs and drawings by Arben N. Arapi and Reha Günay. London: Reaktion Press, 2005. Ousterhout, Robert, and Charalambos Bakirtzis. The Byzantine Monuments of the Evros/Meriç River Valley, 320 pp. Thessaloniki: European Center for Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Monuments, 2007. Özendes, Engin. Osmanlı’nın İkinci Başkenti Edirne: Geçmişten Fotoğraflar. Istanbul: T.C. Kültür Bakanlığı/Yem Yayın, 1999. Şakir-Taş, Aziz Nazmi. Adrianopol’den Edirne’ye (Edirne ve Civarında Osmanlı Kültür Bilim Muhitinin Oluşumu, XIV-XVI yüzyıl). Istanbul: Boğaziçi Universitesi Yayınevi, 2009. Tunca, Ayhan. Edirne’de Tarih Kültür İnanç Turu’nda. Istanbul: İnkilap Kitavevi, 2010. Wasti, Syed Tanvır. “The 1912–13 Balkan Wars and the Siege of Edirne.” Middle Eastern Studies 40, no. 4 (2004), 59–78. Zachariadou, Elizabeth A. “The Conquest of Adrianople by the Turks.” Studi Veneziani XII (1970), 211–17. _____. “The Sultanic Residence and the Capital: Didymoteichon and Adrianople.” In The Ottoman Empire, the Balkans, the Greek Lands: Toward a Social and Economic History, 357–61. Istanbul: The Isis Press, 2007.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 46 Minutes 21 Nov 2015

E212 | Much of the scholarship on the Hanafi school of Islamic jurisprudence, which had its roots in the sociopolitical context of the 8th century Iraq, focuses on the early centuries of that school's development. Meanwhile, recent scholarship on the later periods emphasizes the transformations within the Hanafi jurisprudence in the early modern and modern periods, particularly as a result of the increasing role of the Ottoman state in the process of lawmaking. Dr. Samy Ayoub presents a different approach on Ottoman Hanafi jurists, who maintained the integrity of the legal discourse while recognizing the needs of the times. In this episode, Dr. Ayoub shares some of his reseach on the question of continuity and change under the self-desctibed “late-Hanafis” from the 16th century until the making of mecelle, the first attempt at codifying Islamic law, during the late 19th century. Samy Ayoub earned his Ph.D. in Islamic law from the School of Middle Eastern and North African Studies and the James E. Rogers College of Law at the University of Arizona. He earned a B.A. in Islamic jurisprudence from Al-Azhar University in Cairo, Egypt, in 2006, where he received systematic instruction in Ḥanafī jurisprudence. He also received an MSc. in Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies from the University of Edinburgh in Scotland, UK, in 2008. Dr. Ayoub’s research interests cover the history of the early modern Ottoman Empire, contemporary Arab legal regimes, Muslim ethics, and the Arab renaissance (nahḍa). http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/11/hanafi-law.html CREDITS Episode No. 212 Release date: 22 November 2015 Location: The University of Texas at Austin Produced in collaboration with Christopher Rose at 15 Minute History. Recording credits to Michael Heidenreich (HIGH-den-ryke), Jacob Weiss, and the audio services team in Liberal Arts Instructional Technology Services at the University of Texas at Austin. Sound samples courtesy of Chris Gratien Image from Library of Congress: http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2004668145/ Bibliography courtesy of Samy Ayoub at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/11/hanafi-law.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 33 Minutes 19 Nov 2015

E211 | When employing textual sources for history, it is easy to lose track of the fact that experiences of the past were immersed in rich sensory environments in which "the word" was only a small component of daily life. How can we restore the sights, sounds, and sensations of the Ottoman past? In this episode, Nina Ergin presents some of her research involving the sonic history of the Ottoman Empire, exploring topics such as architecture, gender, and politics through different sources that offer clues about Ottoman soundscapes. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/11/ottoman-sonic-history.html Nina Ergin is Associate Professor in the Department of Archaeology and History of Art at Koç University, specializing in the history of Ottoman architecture. Her work particularly revolves around monuments that have a strong social dimension, such as hamams, soup kitchens and hospitals, as well as around the sensory dimensions of the Ottoman built environment. CREDITS Episode No. 211 Release date: 19 November 2015 Location: Feriköy, Istanbul Editing by Onur Engin (funded by a paid assistantship at Koç University under the supervision of Nina Ergin) Music sample from archive.org: Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla Sound excerpt from CHARISMA project: http://www.odeon.dk/auralisations-compared-situ-recordings Image via Library of Congress Additional sound sample "In Search of Silence" courtesy of Emily Neumeier SELECT PUBLICATIONS OF NINA ERGIN “A Sound Status among the Ottoman Elite: Architectural Patrons of Sixteenth-Century Istanbul Mosques and their Recitation Programs,” Music, Sound and Architecture in Islam, ed. Michael Frishkopf and Federico Spinetti (Austin: University of Texas Press, forthcoming 2016). “Praiseworthy in that Great Multitude was the Silence: Sound/Silence in the Topkapı Palace, Istanbul,” Resounding Images: Medieval Intersections of Art, Music and Sound, ed. Diane Reilly and Susan Boynton (Turnhout: Brepols, forthcoming 2015), 109-133. “Ottoman Royal Women’s Spaces: The Acoustic Dimension,” Journal of Women’s History 26/1 (2014): 89-111. “Hearing Ottoman (Women’s) History: From Archival Sources to the Web and Back Again,” Beyond the Printed Page feature accompanying “Ottoman Royal Women’s Spaces: The Acoustic Dimension,” Journal of Women’s History, http://bingdev.binghamton.edu/jwh/?page_id=1072. “A Multi-Sensorial Message of the Divine and the Personal: Qur’anic Inscriptions and Recitation in Sixteenth-Century Ottoman Mosques,” Calligraphy and Architecture in the Muslim World, ed. Mohammad Gharipouri and Irvin C. Schick (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2013), 105-118. “The Soundscape of Sixteenth-Century Istanbul Mosques: Architecture and Qur’an Recital,” Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 67/2 (2008): 204-221. “The Fragrance of the Divine: Ottoman Incense Burners and Their Context,” The Art Bulletin 96/1 (2014): 70-97.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 44 Minutes 16 Nov 2015

E210 | The subject of health in the modern period is often discussed as a transition from traditional to scientific medicine and what Foucault has called "the birth of the clinic." Such perspectives view medicine and healing through the lens of changing methods, forms of knowledge, and authority. In this podcast, our guest Sylvia Wing Önder offers a slightly different approach to the subject in a discussion of her monograph "We Have No Microbes Here (Carolina Academic Press, 2007)," looking at continuities in the centrality of households and women in making decisions about medical care within a Black Sea village. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/11/health-home-turkey.html Dr. Sylvia Wing Önder has been teaching Turkish Language and Culture at Georgetown University since 1998. Students in her anthropology classes are encouraged to interrogate the power of national, biomedical, military, and educational discourse across cultures by examining constructed and constraining categorizations of citizenship, youth, gender, religiosity, consumer embeddedness, health, and disability. Episode No. 210 Release date: 16 October 2015 Location: Şişli, Istanbul Editing and production by Chris Gratien Musical excerpts from archive.org: Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Giresun Karsilamasi (Altini Bozdurayim) - Bicoglu Osman Image: A traditional Black Sea bone-setter with her daughter-in-law and grandchildren (Photo credit: Sylvia Wing Önder). . .

  Direct Link   Download 34 Minutes 13 Nov 2015

E209 | Moroccan folk literature has drawn the attention of researchers for over a century, beginning with the earliest French colonial ethnographers' exhaustive studies of Moroccan dialects through recordings of poems, folktales, and proverbs. The influence of these stories can also be found in the work of some of Morocco's most internationally acclaimed authors such as Mohammed Mrabet. On this podcast, Yelins Mahtat recounts a folktale from the region of Oulmès in the present-day province of Khemisset. Afterwards, Yelins takes us into the process of collecting and translating Amazigh folktales from the foothills of the Middle Atlas Mountains of Morocco. His research records folktales from storytellers in his family and from the villages near where he grew up. We discuss the politics of authorship and performance as well as the utility of folktales for understanding social and cultural dynamics of the Middle Atlas. Yelins Mahtat is a doctoral candidate in linguistics at Leiden University in the Netherlands. Graham H. Cornwell is a PhD Candidate in History at Georgetown University. His dissertation is entitled "Sweetening the Pot: A History of Tea and Taste in Morocco, 1856-1960. Episode No. 209 (tajine No. 10) Release date: 13 November 2015 Recording location: Nederlands Instituut in Marokko, Rabat Editing and production by Chris Gratien Bibliography courtesy of Yelins Mahtat Musical excerpts from freemusicarchive.org: Brahim Fribgane live Live at WFMU's Transpacific Sound Paradise - http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Brahim_Fribgane/ Image via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Middle_Atlas.jpg SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY Akouaou, Ahmed. "Poésie orale berbère: statut, formes et fonctions." Revue de l'Occident musulman et de la Méditerranée 44.1 (1987): 69-78. Merolla, D. "Intersections: Amazigh (Berber) Literary Space." (2014): 26. Roux, Arsène. "Enigmes et proverbes en berbère-tachelhit." Etudes et documents berbères 12 (1995): 183-197. Savignac, Pierre. Contes berbères de Kabylie. Presses de l'Université du Québec, 1978. Stroomer, Harry. Tashelhiyt Berber Folktales from Tazerwalt (South Morocco): A Linguistic Reanalysis of Hans Stumme's Tazerwelt Texts with an English Translation. Rüdiger Köppe Verlag, 2002.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 35 Minutes 06 Nov 2015

E208 | Osmanlı tarihinde, tıpkı dünya tarihinde olduğu gibi, büyük toplumsal dönüşümlere, devrimlere, savaşlara ve barışlara dair anlatılara erkeklerin eylemleri, sesleri ve kalemleri egemen olurken, kadınlar ve çocuklar sıklıkla bu anlatıların ya dışında bırakıldı yada yardımcı öğesi olageldi. Sosyal ve feminist tarih yazımının en önemli katkısı kadın anlatılarını merkez alarak ve görünür kılarak Osmanlı toplumunda toplumsal cinsiyet rolleri, vatandaşlık hakları ve emek ilişkilerini yeni bir tarih anlayışı ve Osmanlı tarihi anlatısı sunmak oldu. Zeynep Kutluata ile bu bölümde Osmanlı’nın savaşlara ve göçlere karışmış ‘’en uzun yüzyılı’’nda kadınların gerek savaş alanlarında gerekse cephe gerisinde aldıkları aktif siyasi ve toplumsal rolleri vatandaşlık ve toplumsal cinsiyet tartışmaları ekseninde ele aldık. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/11/osmanli-kadin-savas.html Zeynep Kutluata doktorasını Sabancı Üniversitesi Tarih Bölümü'nde tamamlamıştır. “Ottoman Women and the State during World War I” başlıklı tez çalışmasında kadınların yazdıkları arzuhaller üzerine yoğunlaşmakta ve bu arzuhaller aracılığıyla savaş döneminde devlet ve kadınlar arasındaki ilişkiyi incelemektedir. Bölüm No. 208 Yayın Tarihi: 6 November 2015 Kayıt Yeri: Feriköy, Istanbul Müzik (archive.org): Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Abdullah Yuce - Bu Ne Sevgi Ah Bu Ne Izdirap Bibiliyografya: Zeynep Kutluata'nın müsadesiyle Resim kaynağı GoogleBooks https://books.google.com/books?id=3vNTAAAAcAAJ&dq=Tableau%20historique%2C%20politique%20et%20pittoresque%20de%20la%20Turquie%20et%20de%20la%20Russie&pg=PA109#v=onepage&q=fatima&f=false SEÇME KAYNAKÇA Akın, Yiğit. "War, Women, and the State: The Politics of Sacrifice in the Ottoman Empire During the First World War". Journal of Women's History. 26, no. 3 (2014): 12-35. Ben-Bassat, Yuval. Petitioning the Sultan: Protests and Justice in Late Ottoman Palestine, 1865-1908, London-New York: I.B. Tauris, 2013. Dombrowski, Nicole Ann (ed.). Women and War in the Twentieth Century : Enlisted with or without Consent. New York: Garland.1999. Mazlımyan, Kohar. “Türk Kadını Savaş Yıllarında Ne Yaptı,” Hay Gin, year: 1, no: 14, 16 May 1920, trans. Lerna Ekmekçioğlu, in Kültür ve Siyasette Feminist Yaklaşımlar, no: 2, February 2007. Kutluata, Zeynep “Geç Osmanlı Erken Cumhuriyet Dönemi’nde Savaş ve Toplumsal Cinsiyet: Kara Fatma(lar)”, Kültür ve Siyasette Feminist Yaklaşımlar, 2006-2007 Seçkisi, İstanbul: BGST Yayınları, 149- 68. Lex Heerma van Voss (ed.) Petitions in Social History, NY: The Presss Syndicate of the University of Cambridge, 2001. Sarıyıldız, Gülden. Sokak Yazıcıları: Osmanlılarda Arzuhaller ve Arzuhalciler, Istanbul: Derlem Yayınları, 2010. Zaeske, Susan. Signatures of Citizenship: Petitioning, Antislavery, and Women’s Political Identity, The University of North Carolina Press, 2003.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 34 Minutes 04 Nov 2015

E207 | The 1925 Syrian Revolt was catalyzed by contestation over authority between local notables and the French mandate government, but it soon spread throughout the mandate as a form of anti-French protest. In this episode, Reem Bailony explores the ways in which the Great Syrian Revolt was also a transnational affair, sharing her research on the activities of the Greater Syrian diaspora in the Americas, Europe, and beyond over the course of 1925-27. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/11/transnationalism-and-1925-syrian-revolt.html Reem Bailony earned her Ph.D. in History from UCLA. Her dissertation entitled, “Transnational Rebellion: The Syrian Revolt of 1925-1927,” examines the long-distance nationalism of Syrian-Lebanese migrant communities in relationship to the anti-French rebellion of 1925. She is currently a visiting lecturer at Smith and Mount Holyoke Colleges. Episode No. 207 Release date: 4 November 2015 Recording Location: Northampton, MA Editing and production by Chris Gratien Musical excerpts form archive.org: Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer; Muzaffer Akgun - Ha Bu Diyar Bibliography and image courtesy of Reem Bailony SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY al-Atrash, Sultan Pasha. Al-mudhakkirat al-kamilah lil-za‘im sultan basha al-atrash: al-qa‘id al-‘am lil-thawra al-suriyah al-kubra, 1925-1927, 1998. al-Bi‘ayni, Hasan. Sultan Basha Al-Atrash Wa-Al-Thawrah Al-Suriyah Al-Kubra. London: Muʼassasat al-Turath al-Durzi, 2008. Anderson, Benedict. “Long-Distance Nationalism.” The Spectre of Comparisons. London: Verso, 1998: 58-74. Arsan, Andrew. "‘This Age is the Age of Associations’: Committees, Petitions, and the Roots of Interwar Middle Eastern Internationalism." Journal of Global History 7.02 (2012): 166-188. Arsan, Andrew, John Karam, and Akram Khater. "On Forgotten Shores: Migration in Middle East Studies and the Middle East in Migration Studies." Mashriq & Mahjar: Journal of Middle East Migration Studies 1.1 (2013). Bawardi, Hani. The Making of Arab Americans: From Syrian Nationalism to U.S. Citizenship (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2014). Fahrenthold, Stacy. "Transnational Modes and Media: The Syrian Press in the Mahjar and Emigrant Activism during World War I." Mashriq & Mahjar: Journal of Middle East Migration Studies 1.1 (2013). Glick Schiller, Nina Linda Basch, and Cristina Szanton Blanc. “Transnationalism: A New Analytic Framework for Understanding Migration.” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 645: 1. July 1992: 1-24. Gualtieri, Sarah. Between Arab and White: Race and Ethnicity in the Early Syrian American Diaspora. Berkeley: University of California, 2009. Khater, Akram Fouad. “Becoming ‘Syrian’ in America: A Global Geography of Ethnicity and Nation.” Diaspora 14:2/3 (2005): 299-331. Khoury, Philip S. Syria and the French Mandate: the Politics of Arab Nationalism, 1920-1945. Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP, 1987. Nuwayhid,‘Ajaj. Sittun ʻaman Maʻa Al-Qafilah Al-ʻarabiyah: Mudhakkirat ʻajaj Nuwayhid. Beirut: Dar al-Istiqlal, 1993. Pedersen, Susan. "Samoa on the World Stage: Petitions and Peoples before the Mandates Commission of the League of Nations." The Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History 40, no. 2 (2012). Provence, Michael. The Great Syrian Revolt and the Rise of Arab Nationalism. Austin: University of Texas, 2005. Waldinger, Roger D. and David Fitzgerald. "Transnationalism in Question." American Journal of Sociology 109.5 (2004): 1177-95.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 61 Minutes 29 Oct 2015

E206 | In this episode, Sherene Seikaly discusses the intersection of politics and economics under the British Mandate in Palestine through the lens of Palestinian capitalists, who are the subject of her new book entitled Men of Capital: Scarcity and Economy in Mandate Palestine (Stanford University Press). More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/10/capitalism-palestine.html Sherene Seikaly is Assistant Professor of history at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is the editor of the Arab Studies Journal, and co-founder and editor of Jadaliyya e-zine. Seikaly's Men of Capital: Scarcity and Economy in Mandate Palestine (Stanford University Press, 2016) explores how Palestinian capitalists and British colonial officials used economy to shape territory, nationalism, the home, and the body. Episode No. 206 Release date: 30 October 2015 Location: Georgetown University Editing and production by Chris Gratien Bibliography courtesy of Graham Pitts Musical excerpts from archive.org: Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Bozlak and Halay - Yozgatli Hafiz Suleyman Bey; Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla Sherene Seikaly's Men of Capital on Stanford University Press website: http://www.sup.org/books/title/?id=20592 SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY Toufoul Abou-Hodeib,"Taste and Class in Late Ottoman Beirut," International Journal of Middle East Studies 43.03 (2011): 475-492. Charles W. Anderson, From Petition to Confrontation: The Palestinian National Movement and the Rise of Mass Politics, 1929-1939, Diss. New York University, 2013. Ghassan Kanafani, Thawrat 1936-1939 fi Filastin [The 1936-1939 Revolt in Palestine], 1972. Ilham Khuri-Makdisi, The Eastern Mediterranean and the Making of Global Radicalism, 1860-1914, University of California Press, 2010. Weldon C. Matthews, Confronting an Empire, Constructing a Nation: Arab Nationalities and Popular Politics in Mandate Palestine, London: I. B. Tauris, 2006. Sherene Seikaly, Men of Capital: Scarcity and Economy in Mandate Palestine, Stanford University Press, 2016. _____. “Bodies and Needs: Lesson from Palestine,” International Journal of Middle East Studies 46 (2014); 784-786. _____. "Gender and the People in Revolutionary Times" Jadaliyya (June, 2013).. . .

  Direct Link   Download 30 Minutes 22 Oct 2015

E205 | In the 1920s and 1930s, politicians, intellectuals, and members of the public joined a lively debate about the issue of female suicide in Turkey. While we cannot know whether the rates of female suicide were actually skyrocketing during this period, the fact that so many public figures began to treat this issue as a central concern tells us a lot about the relationship between the modernizing state of Early Republican Turkey and the women whom it governed. In this episode, Nazan Maksudyan explores what might have provoked this debate, what it might say about the state and its relationship to women, gender, and the female body, and how women themselves might have used suicide as a means of asserting their agency. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/10/suicide-turkey.html Nazan Maksudyan is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Istanbul Kemerburgaz University. Her work examines the social, cultural, and economic history of children and youth during the late Ottoman period. Episode No. 205 Release date: 25 October 2015 Recording location: Kemerburgaz University Editing by Onur Engin, generously funded by a paid assistantship at Koç University under the supervision of Associate Professor Nina Ergin Bibliography courtesy of Nazan Maksudyan Image courtesy of Nicholas Danforth SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY A. Holly Shissler. "If You Ask Me': Sabiha Sertel's Advice Column, Gender Equity, and Social Engineering in the Early Turkish Republic," Journal of Middle East Women's Studies 3 (2007): 1-30. A. Holly Shissler. "Beauty Is Nothing to be Ashamed of: Beauty Contests as Tools of Women’s Liberation in Early Republican Turkey," Comparative Studies of South-Asia, Africa and the Middle-East 24 (2004): 107–122. Ruth A. Miller. The Limits of Bodily Integrity: Abortion, Adultery, and Rape Legislation in Comparative Perspective. Aldershot, United Kingdom: Ashgate, 2007. Pelin Başçı. "Love, Marriage, and Motherhood: Changing Expectations of Women in Late Ottoman Istanbul," Turkish Studies, 4 (2003): 145-177. Nazan Maksudyan. “Control over Life, Control over Body: Female Suicide in Early Republican Turkey.” Women’s History Review (Spring 2014): 1. Nazan Maksudyan. "'This time women as well got involved in politics!': Nineteenth Century Ottoman Women's Organizations and Political Agency." In Women and the City, Women in the City: A Gendered Perspective to Ottoman Urban History, Nazan Maksudyan (ed.) New York: Berghahn Books, 2014. pp. 107-135. Ayça Alemdaroğlu. "Politics of the Body and Eugenic Discourse in Early Republican Turkey," Body & Society 11 (2005): 61-76. Nurullah Şenol. "Arşiv Belgeleri Işığında Osmanlı Toplumunda İntihar," Toplumsal Tarih 110 (2003): 52-56. Nurullah Ulutaş. Türk Romanında İntihar (1872-1960). Ph.D. dissertation, Uludağ University, 2006. Zafer Toprak. "Dr. Cemal Zeki’nin ‘Delişmen, Çılgın Kızlar’ı – Cumhuriyette Genç Kız ve Kadın İntiharları," Toplumsal Tarih 87 (2001) : 25-29.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 27 Minutes 20 Oct 2015

E204 | In the decades following the Armenian genocide, communities of the diaspora began to document the life of Ottoman Armenians in the towns and villages of Anatolia and publish their material in memory books aimed at preserving and transmitting Armenian histories for posterity. Largely composed in Armenian and languages of the diaspora, these books have circulated in small circles for decades as tiny fragments of a treasured but fading past. In recent years, digital technologies have created a new venue for piecing back together these fragments and sharing the history of Ottoman Armenians in a public forum. In this episode, we speak to historian Vahé Tachjian about the houshamadyan project, which since 2011 has served as a virtual space for the reconstruction and exploration of Ottoman Armenian life. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/10/reconstructing-ottoman-armenian-life.html Vahé Tachjian earned his Ph.D. in History and Civilization at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) in Paris. He has published widely on the history of the French Mandates in the Middle East and Armenians in the 19th and 20th centuries. He is also project director of houshamadyan, a project to reconstruct Ottoman Armenian town and village life. Visit http://www.houshamadyan.org/ Episode No. 204 Release Date: 17 October 2015 Location: Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ Editing and production by Chris Gratien Special thanks to Nora Lessersohn for Hovannes Cherishian's recording of "Kun yeghir balas" Additional music from Maro Nalbandian. . .

  Direct Link   Download 49 Minutes 13 Oct 2015

E203 | The history of the modern world is one of overlapping displacements that have severed ties not only between people and their ancestral homes but also their histories. The writing of village history among displaced communities such as Ashkenazi Jews and Ottoman Armenians has emerged as a means of preserving that history for future generations in the diaspora. In this episode, Rochelle Davis discusses her work on the village history genre among Palestinians, its place within Palestinian historical memory, and the ways in which these sources can enrich our understanding of the past. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/10/palestinian-village-histories-rochelle.html Rochelle Davis is an Associate Professor of Anthropology in the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies in the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. Her primary research work is on refugees in the Arab World, initially Palestinian refugees (Palestinian Village Histories: Geographies of the Displaced (Stanford University Press, 2011)) and more recently Iraqi and Syrian refugees. A second research project examines the US military’s conceptions of culture in the 21st century wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Release date: 14 October 2015 Location: Georgetown University Editing and production by Chris Gratien Copyright free musical excerpts Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi; Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep Image via Library of Congress BIBLIOGRAPHY Davis, Rochelle. Palestinian Village Histories: Geographies of the Displaced. Stanford, Calif: Stanford University Press, 2011. Ben-Ze'ev, Efrat. Remembering Palestine in 1948: Beyond National Narratives. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011. Doumani, Beshara. Rediscovering Palestine Merchants and Peasants in Jabal Nablus, 1700-1900. Berkeley, Calif: University of California Press, 1995. Shryock, Andrew. Nationalism and the Genealogical Imagination Oral History and Textual Authority in Tribal Jordan. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997. Slyomovics, Susan. The Object of Memory: Arab and Jew Narrate the Palestinian Village. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1998. Swedenburg, Ted. Memories of Revolt: The 1936-1939 Rebellion and the Palestinian National Past. Minneapolis, Minn: University of Minnesota Press, 1995. Tamārī, Salīm. Mountain against the Sea Essays on Palestinian Society and Culture. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2009. _____. Year of the Locust A Soldier's Diary and the Erasure of Palestine's Ottoman Past. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2011.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 25 Minutes 08 Oct 2015

E202 | Bath houses or hamams were mainstays of the Ottoman city. But as semi-public spaces where people could mix and implicitly transgressed certain boundaries regarding nudity, they were also spaces that produced anxiety and calls for regulation. In this episode, Elyse Semerdjian discusses how in a certain time and place of eighteenth century Aleppo, the issue of Muslim and Christian women bathing together aroused the concern of Ottoman state and society. Elyse Semerdjian is the Director of Global Studies and Associate Professor of Middle East/Islamic World History. A specialist in early modern Ottoman history and Syria, she authored “Off the Straight Path”: Illicit Sex, Law, and Community in Ottoman Aleppo (Syracuse University Press, 2008) as well as several articles on gender, non-Muslims, and law in the Ottoman Empire. Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/10/bathhouse-aleppo.html Episode No. 202 Release date: 8 October 2015 Location: Bebek, Istanbul Editing and production by Chris Gratien Copyright free musical excerpts Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem and Sari Recep; Rizeli Sadik - Erkek Kadin Oyun Havasi; Wadih El Safi - Bissaha Bibliography courtesy of Elyse Semerdjian SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY Elyse Semerdjian, "Off the Straight Path" Illicit Sex, Law, and Community in Ottoman Aleppo. Syracuse, N.Y.: Syracuse University Press, 2008. ______. "Naked Anxiety: Bathhouses, Nudity, and the Dhimmī Woman in 18th-Century Aleppo" The International Journal of Middle Eastern Studies, Vol. 45, No. 04, pp. 651-676. Abraham Marcus, “Privacy in Eighteenth-Century Aleppo: The Limits of Cultural Ideals,” The International Journal of Middle East Studies, 18 (1986) 165-183. Astrid Meier, “Bathing as a Translocal Phenomenon? Bathhouses in the Arab Provinces of the Ottoman Empire,” in Bathing Culture of Anatolian Civilizations: Architecture, History, Imagination, ed. Nina Ergin Leuven: Peters, 2011 168-197. Madeline Zilfi, Women and Slavery in the Late Ottoman Empire: The Design of Difference (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010) and Marc Baer “Islamic Conversion Narratives of Women: Social Change and Gendered Religious Donald Quataert, “Clothing Laws, State, and Society in the Ottoman Empire, 1720-1829,” International Journal of Middle East Studies, vol. 29, No. 3 (Aug. 1997), 403-425. . .

  Direct Link   Download 42 Minutes 22 Sep 2015

E201 | The production of motion pictures began in the 1890s, and before long, films were being screened throughout the world, including in Ottoman cities. How did Ottoman audiences receive the advent of film? What was the role of the state in promoting or limiting the spread of motion pictures? What were the contents of the earliest films shown and produced in the Ottoman Empire? In this episode, Özde Çeliktemel-Thomen offers an introduction to the emergence of cinema in the Ottoman Empire and discusses the results of her research on the subject at the Ottoman archives in Istanbul. Özde Çeliktemel-Thomen is a doctoral candidate in the Centre for Multidisciplinary & Intercultural Inquiry at University College London researching the history of cinema in the Ottoman Empire and Turkey. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/09/cinema-ottoman-empire-turkey.html Episode No. 201 Release date: 23 September 2015 Location: Feriköy, Istanbul Editing and production by Chris Gratien Music and sound excerpts: Mısır Çarşısı (Chris Gratien); Rüçhan Çamay & Dün Bügün ve Yarın - Televizyon; Baglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and Muzaffer Bibliography courtesy of Özde Çeliktemel-Thomen Image by Ressam Salih (1943) SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY For the film collection of the Turkish Armed Forces, see this article in Sabah: http://www.sabah.com.tr/medya/2015/06/17/tsknin-ilk-kez-yayinladigi-tarihi-goruntuler Savaş Arslan. Cinema in Turkey: A New Critical History (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011). Özde Çeliktemel-Thomen. "Denetimden Sansüre Osmanlı’da Sinema." Toplumsal Tarih, no. 255, (March 2015): 72-79. Özde Çeliktemel-Thomen. “1903 Sinematograf İmtiyazı.” Toplumsal Tarih, no. 229 (January 2013): 26-32. Özde Çeliktemel-Thomen. “Prime Ministry Ottoman Archives: Inventory of Written Archival Sources for Ottoman Cinema History.” Tarih, Issue 3, Boğaziçi University Department of History (2013): 17–48. Özde Çeliktemel-Thomen. “Mürebbiye/The Governess.” In Directory of World Cinema: Turkey, edited by Eylem Atakav, 61-63. (Bristol: Intellect, 2013). Nezih Erdoğan. “The Spectator in the Making: Modernity and Cinema in Istanbul, 1896-1928.” In Orienting Istanbul Cultural Capital of Europe, edited by Deniz Göktürk, Levent Soysal and İpek Türeli, 129-143. (London: Routledge, 2010). Dilek Kaya-Mutlu. “Ayastefanos’taki Rus Abidesi: Kim Yıktı? Kim Çekti? Kim ‘Yazdı?’” Seyir, no. 3 (Spring 2006): 12-21. Hamid Naficy. A Social History of Iranian Cinema. Durham [N.C.]: Duke University Press, 2011. Mustafa Özen. “Travelling Cinema in Istanbul.” In Travelling Cinema in Europe: Sources and Perspectives, edited by Martin Loiperdinger, 47-53. (Kintop Schriften, 2008). Saadet Özen. "'Balkanların İlk Sinemacıları' mı? Manaki Biraderler." Toplumsal Tarih, no. 219 (March 2012): 60-67. Saadet Özen. “Rethinking the Young Turk Revolution: Manaki Brothers’ Still and Moving Images.” MA thes., (Boğaziçi University, 2010). Emrah Özen. “Geçmişe Bakmak: Sinema Tarihi Çalışmaları Üzerine Eleştirel Bir İnceleme.” Kebikeç, Sinema ve Tarih, no 27 (2009): 131-155. Ali Özuyar. Babıali’de Sinema. (İstanbul: İzdüşüm Yayınları, 2004).. . .

  Direct Link   Download 28 Minutes 12 Sep 2015

E200 | "Sectarianism" is a a slippery term, now used to describe everything from Saudi Arabian foreign policy to the daily functioning of Lebanese politics to the rhetoric of the Islamic State. In this episode, historian Ussama Makdisi takes on the history of both the term "sectarian" and the kinds of communal political divides it is often used to describe in the late Ottoman Empire and the 20th century Middle East, reflecting on his former work and offering a preview of his forthcoming scholarship. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/09/rethinking-sectarianism-in-middle-east.html Ussama Makdisi is Professor of History and the first holder of the Arab-American Educational Foundation Chair of Arab Studies at Rice University. He is the author of Faith Misplaced: the Broken Promise of U.S.-Arab Relations, 1820-2001 (Public Affairs, 2010), Artillery of Heaven: American Missionaries and the Failed Conversion of the Middle East (Cornell University Press, 2008), and the Culture of Sectarianism: Community, History, and Violence in Nineteenth-Century Ottoman Lebanon (University of California Press, 2000). (see faculty page) Episode No. 200 Release Date: 13 September 2015 Location: Yeniköy, Istanbul Editing and production by Chris Gratien Musical excerpts from archive.org: Turnalar Turnalar - Darulelhan Heyeti; Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi Image via US Library of Congress Bibliography courtesy of Susanna Ferguson SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY Asad, Talal. Formations of the Secular: Christianity, Islam, Modernity. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2003. Campos, Michelle. Ottoman Brothers: Muslim, Christians, and Jews in Early Twentieth-Century Palestine. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2011. Der Matossian, Bedross. Shattered Dreams of Revolution: From Liberty to Violence in the Late Ottoman Empire. 2014. Greene, Molly. A Shared World: Christians and Muslims in the Early Modern Mediterranean. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2000. Makdisi, Ussama. Artillery of Heaven: American Missionaries and the Failed Conversion of the Middle East. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2008. _____. The Culture of Sectarianism: Community, History and Violence in Ottoman Lebanon. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2000. Masters, Bruce Alan. Christians and Jews in the Ottoman Arab World: The Roots of Sectarianism. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001. White, Benjamin T. The Emergence of Minorities in the Middle East: The Politics of Community in French Mandate Syria. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2011.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 31 Minutes 02 Sep 2015

E199 | Within the historiography, major shifts and developments in schools of thought and legal interpretation have dominated the narrative of how Islamic law has spread and transformed across time. However, as our guest Guy Burak argues in his new monograph, The Second Formation of Islamic Law, structural changes in the relationship between state, society, and law are also an important part of this story. In this episode, Dr. Burak explains how law transformed under post-Mongol Islamicate empires such as the Ottomans through changes in the ways these states claimed legal authority. Guy Burak is the Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies Librarian at NYU's Elmer Holmes Bobst Library. For "The Second Formation of Islamic Law", see: http://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/history/middle-east-history/second-formation-islamic-law-hanafi-school-early-modern-ottoman-empire?format=HB Release date: 4 September 2015 Location: RCAC, Istanbul Editing and production by Chris Gratien Bibliography courtesy of Guy Burak Music excerpts via archive.org and Free Music Archive: Murat Kenarinda (Egin Havasi) - Agyazar Efendi; Karaköy Balık Pazarı (Chris Gratien); Muzaffer Akgun - Ha Bu Diyar; Podington Bear SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY Guy Burak, The Second Formation of Islamic Law: The Hanafi School in the Early Modern Ottoman Empire (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2015). Richard C. Repp, The Müfti of Istanbul: A Study in the Development of the Ottoman Learned Hierarchy (London: Ithaca Press, 1986). Abdurrahman Atcil, “The Formation of the Ottoman Learned Class and Legal Scholarship (1300–1600)” (PhD diss., University of Chicago, 2010). Colin Imber, Ebuʾs-Suʿud: The Islamic Legal Tradition (Stanford, CA : Stanford University Press , 1997 ) ; Rudolph Peters, “What Does It Mean to Be an Official Madhhab? Hanafism and the Ottoman Empire,” in The Islamic School of Law: Evolution, Devolution, and Progress, ed. Peri Baerman , Rudolph Peters , and Frank E. Vogel (Cambridge, MA: Islamic Legal Studies Program, Harvard Law School, distributed by Harvard University Press, 2005), 147–58 Snjezana Buzov, “The Lawgiver and His Lawmakers: The Role of Legal Discourse in the Change of Ottoman Imperial Culture” (PhD diss., University of Chicago, 2005); Haim Gerber, State, Society, and Law in Islam: Ottoman Law in Comparative Perspective ( Albany : State University of New York , 1994 ) . Martha Mundy and Richard Saumarez-Smith, Governing Property, Making the Modern State: Law, Administration, and Production in Ottoman Syria (London: I. B. Tauris, 2007), esp. chs. 2-3. Judith E. Tucker, In the House of the Law: Gender and Islamic Law in Ottoman Syria and Palestine (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998).. . .

  Direct Link   Download 59 Minutes 26 Aug 2015

E198 | The Treaty of Berlin in 1878 brought an Austro-Hungarian occupation to many parts of the Balkans such as Bosnia that had lived under Ottoman rule for centuries. While this was certainly a historical rupture, as Leyla Amzi-Erdoğdular emphasizes, this period also witnessed some important continuities with the Ottoman past. In this episode, we discuss Dr. Amzi-Erdoğdular's ongoing book project regarding those continuities and examine the lives of Ottoman Muslims of Bosnia between two empires. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/08/bosnia-ottoman-empire-austria.html Leyla Amzi-Erdoğdular is a Lecturer in Ottoman Language at Columbia University. She received her Ph.D. from the Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian and African Studies at Columbia University. She is currently working on a book manuscript entitled Afterlife of Empire, which explores Ottoman continuities in Habsburg Bosnia-Herzegovina. Release date: 28 August 2015 Location: Columbia University Editing and production by Chris Gratien Musical excerpt of "Bülbülüm Altın Kafeste" courtesy of Ahmet Erdoğdular and Makam New York Bibliography and images courtesy of Leyla Amzi-Erdoğdular Susanna Ferguson is a doctoral candidate in Middle Eastern History at Columbia University, where she focuses on the history of women and gender in the Arab world during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 60 Minutes 20 Aug 2015

E197 | This podcast explores murky boundaries in two senses. The first has to do with Anglo-Ottoman commerce and diplomacy in the early modern period. Like the more well-known case of the the British East India Company in South Asia, British diplomatic representation in Constantinople was also controlled by a corporate entity. Known as the Levant Company, the institution ensured that from the late 16th to the early 19th century there was little distinction between merchants and statesmen when it came to British diplomacy in the Ottoman Empire. The blurred lines gave way to what might be called a “cycle of necessity,” in which British diplomats gave gifts to secure commercial privileges for British merchants who would then fund the diplomats to provide gifts again. Yet the cycle did not always proceed smoothly, and discrepancies between translations of agreements often played a key role in hitches, in the process raising basic yet profound questions about what treaty-making meant. The second part of the podcast considers Ottoman maritime space and legal order more broadly. With respect to this theme, murkiness makes another appearance, this time as it related to the ability to possess or control the sea. What did it mean to draw a line across the waves, to differentiate between su and derya? Particularly in an age of imprecise mapmaking technologies, these efforts at delineation often were accompanied by a good deal of ambiguity, pointing to the complexity - if not always plurality - of legal cultures and claims to sovereignty that existed in the Ottoman maritime space and, indeed, that extended even ashore the Well-Protected Domains as well. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/08/british-ottoman-diplomacy-and-making-of.html Dr. Michael Talbot completed his PhD at the School of African and Oriental Studies in London. He is currently a post-doctoral researcher with the Mediterranean Reconfigurations project at Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne. Episode No. 197 Release Date: 22 August 2015 Location: Paris, France Editing and production by Chris Gratien Bibliography courtesy of Michael Talbot Image via http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O916899/a-british-official-probably-the-watercolour-anonymous-greek-artist/. . .

  Direct Link   Download 33 Minutes 19 Aug 2015

E196 | During the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, scientists and physicians the world over began to think of sex as something that could be studied and understood through rational methods. In places like Germany, these sexologists were associated with progressive political movements that combated stigmatization of homosexuality and contraception and broke taboos regarding issues such as impotence and masturbation. In this episode, Liat Kozma examines how sexology traveled and transformed in Middle Eastern contexts through the writings of Egyptian doctors and Jewish exiles. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/p/women-gender-and-sex-in-history.html Liat Kozma is a senior lecturer at the Department of Islamic and Middle East Studies, the Hebrew University. She is currently working on a book manuscript on regulated prostitution in the interwar Middle East and North Africa. Chris Gratien is a doctoral candidate at Georgetown University researching the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. Susanna Ferguson is a doctoral candidate in Middle Eastern History at Columbia University, where she focuses on the history of women and gender in the Arab world in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Release date: 19 August 2015 Location: Okmeydanı, Istanbul Editing and production by Chris Gratien Bibliography and images courtesy of Liat Kozma Additional thanks to Seçil Yılmaz ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY courtesy of Liat Kozma Liat Kozma, " 'We, the Sexologists . . .': Arabic Medical Writing on Sexuality, 1879–1943," Journal of the History of Sexuality 22:3 (2013), 426-445. Liat Kozma, "sexology in the Yishuv: The rise and decline of sexual consultation in Tel Aviv, 1930–39", International Journal of Middle East Studies 42 (May 2010), 231-249. Liat Kozma, "Translating Sexology, Writing the Nation: Sexual Discourse and Practice in Hebrew and in Arabic in the 1930s," In Heike Bauer, Sexology and Translation: Cultural and Scientific Encounters across the Modern World. London: Temple University Press, 2015. Further Reading On Ottoman sexual discourses, see Dror Ze'evi, Producing Desire:‎ Changing Sexual Discourse in the Ottoman Middle East, 1500-1900. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2006 (especially chapter 1). On sexual discourses in the 20th century Egypt, see Wilson Chacko Jacob, Working Out Egypt: Effendi Masculinity and Subject Formation in Colonial Modernity, 1870–1940. Durham: Duke University Press, 2011 (especially chapter 6). On scientification of the human body in early twentieth century Egypt, consult also Hanan Kholoussy, "Monitoring and Medicalising Male Sexuality in Semi-Colonial Egypt," Gender & History 22 (2010), 677-691; Hibba Abugideiri, Gender and the Making of Modern Medicine in Colonial Egypt. London: Ashgate, 2010, chapter 7 (titled "Egyptian doctors and domestic medicine"); and Oumnia El Shakry, The Great Social Laboratory: Subjects of Knowledge in Colonial and Postcolonial Egypt. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2007. On sexuality in early Zionist ideology, see Daniel Boyarin, Unheroic Conduct: The Rise of Heterosexuality and the Invention of the Jewish Man. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997; John M. Efron, Defenders of the Race: Jewish Doctors and Race Science in Fin-De-Siècle Europe. New Haven, Con.: Yale University Press, 1994. On concept of "sexual reform" disseminated in different European contexts (including the UK, the Netherlands and Spain) in the interwar period through the German-inspired World League for Sexual Reform, see a theme issue of the Journal of the History of Sexuality, vol. 12, issue 1 (January 2003). Heike Bauer's forthcoming Sexology and Translation: Cultural and Scientific Encounters across the Modern World. London: Temple University Press, 2015 – will cover more such contexts of influence, including China, Japan, Russia and Peru.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 42 Minutes 11 Aug 2015

E195 | Visit http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/08/ottoman-empire-photography-edhem-eldem.html for images associated with the podcast. Photography came to the Ottoman Empire almost immediately after its invention in 1839. Some of the major figures and studios involved in Ottoman photography have been identified, and certain stylistic aspects of images produced in and of the Ottoman Empire such as orientalism are well established. Yet there is comparatively little extant work regarding the reception, impact, and circulation of images during the late Ottoman period. In this episode, Emily Neumeier and Nir Shafir sit down with Edhem Eldem to discuss the ways in which restoring contexts of viewing, circulation, and publication of images offers a different story of late Ottoman photography using examples from the Camera Ottomana photography exhibition at Koç RCAC in Istanbul, curated by Zeynep Çelik, Edhem Eldem, and Bahattin Öztuncay. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/08/ottoman-empire-photography-edhem-eldem.html Edhem Eldem is a professor in the Department of History at Boğaziçi University. Emily Neumeier is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Art History at the University of Pennsylvania researching art and architecture in the Ottoman world. Nir Shafir is a doctoral candidate at UCLA focusing on the history of knowledge and science in the early modern Middle East. He also runs the website HAZİNE, which profiles different archives, libraries, and museums that house sources on the Islamic world. Episode No. 195 Release Date: 11 August 2015 Location: Boğaziçi University Editing and production by Chris Gratien Bibliography and images courtesy of Edhem Eldem and Emily Neumeier Musical excerpts from archive.org: Harmandali - Recep Efendi, Cemal Efendi / Kemany Minas - Eghin Havasi (1925) / Katibim (Uskudar'a Gider iken) - Safiye Ayla The Camera Ottomana exhibit, curated by Zeynep Çelik, Edhem Eldem, and Bahattin Öztuncay, is on display at Koç RCAC / ANAMED in Beyoğlu, Istanbul until 19 August 2015. FURTHER READING Camera Ottomana exhibit website Camera Ottomana exhibit catalog, by Zeynep Çelik, Edhem Eldem, Bahattin Öztuncay, Frances Terpak & Peter Louis Bonfitto (Koç University Press, 2015) Eldem, Edhem. "Powerful Images: The Dissemination and Impact of Photography in the Ottoman Empire, 1870-1914" in Camera Ottomana, ed. Zeynep Çelik and Edhem Eldem. Koç University Press, 2015. Baleva, Martina. “Revolution in the Darkroom: Nineteenth-Century Portrait Photography as a Visual Discourse of Authenticity.” Hungarian Historical Review 3, no. 2 (2014): 363­–390. Gavin, Carney E. S., ed. “Imperial Self-Portrait: The Ottoman Empire as Revealed in the Sultan Abdul Hamid II’s Photographic Albums Presented as Gifts to the Library of Congress (1893) and the British Museum (1894).” Special issue. Journal of Turkish Studies; Türklük Bilgisi Araştırmaları 12 (1988). Marsoobian, Armen T. Fragments of a Lost Homeland: Remembering Armenia. London: I. B. Tauris, 2015. Özendes, Engin. From Sébah & Joaillier to Foto Sabah: Orientalism in Photography. Istanbul: YKY, 2004. Öztuncay, Bahattin, The Photographers of Constantinople: Pioneers, Studios, and Artists from 19th Century Istanbul. Istanbul: Aygaz, 2003.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 44 Minutes 27 Jul 2015

E194 | At the turn of the twentieth century, Turkish-speaking Greek intellectuals of Cappadocian origin found themselves between mutually opposed Turkish and Greek nationalist ideologies. Their unique cultural background and their belief in the promises of the Young Turk Revolution allowed them to develop an alternative brand of Greek identity, one that combined cultural Hellenism with political loyalty to the Ottoman State. But their hopes never came true, and as such, they have been written out of history and forgotten. In this episode, we talk to Vangelis Kechriotis about his latest research on Cappadocian Christians and other issues relating to late Ottoman Greek identity, exploring the fascinating careers and difficult political choices of those caught between competing nationalist discourses. Vangelis Kechriotis is an Assistant Professor of History at Boğaziçi University. He specializes in history of non-Muslims in the late Ottoman Empire, particularly the Greek Orthodox. His PhD dissertation completed at the University of Leiden examined the history of the Greek community of Izmir. His latest work focuses on the history of complex cultural and political identities of Cappadocian Greeks. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/07/ottomanism-with-greek-face-vangelis.html Editing and Production by Chris Gratien Bibliography courtesy of Polina Ivanova Musical excerpts from archive.org: Istanbul'dan Ayva Gelir Nar Gelir - Azize Tozem & Sari Recep / Nazmiye by Rizeli Sadik SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY Balta, Evangelia. Beyond the Language Frontier: Studies on the Karamanlis and the Karamanlidika Printing. Istanbul: Isis Press, 2010. Benlisoy, Foti and Stefo Benlisoy. “Reading the Identity of “Karamanli” Through the Pages of Anatoli.” In Cries and Whispers in Karamanlidika Books: proceedings of the first International Conference on Karamanlidika Studies (Nicosia, 11th-13th September 2008), edited by Evangelia Balta and Matthias Kappler, 93-108. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2010. Braude, Benjamin and Bernard Lewis, eds. Christians and Jews in in the Ottoman Empire: the Functioning of a Plural Society. New York: Holmes and Meier: 1982. Kechriotis, Vangelis. “Ottomanism with a Greek Face: Karamanlı Greek Orthodox Diaspora at the End of the Ottoman Empire.” In Mediterranean Diasporas: Politics and Ideas in the Long 19th Century, edited by Maurizio Isabella and Konstantina Zanou, 189-204. London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2015. Kechriotis, Vangelis. “Atina’da Kapadokyalı, İzmir’de Atinalı, İstanbul’da Mebus: Pavlos Karolidis’in Farklı Kişilik ve Aidiyetleri,” Toplumsal Tarih, no. 257 (May 2015), 28-35. Kechriotis, Vangelis. “Osmanlı İmparatorluğu’nun son döneminde Karamanlı Rum Ortodoks diasporası İzmir mebusu Emmanouil Emmanouilidis,” Toplumsal Tarih, no. 251 (November 2014), 38-43. Kechriotis, Vangelis. “On the margins of national historiography: The Greek Ittihatçı Emmanouil Emmanouilidis – opportunist or Ottoman patriot?” In Untold Histories of the Middle East: Recovering Voices from the 19th and 20th Centuries, edited by Amy Singer, Christoph K. Neumann, and S. Aksin Somel, 124-142. London: Routledge, 2011. Kechriotis, Vangelis. “Educating the Nation: Migration and Acculturation on the Two Shores of the Aegean at the Turn of the Twentieth Century.” In Cities of the Mediterranean: From the Ottomans to the Present Day, edited by Meltem Toksöz and Biray Kulluoğlu. 139-156. London: I.B. Tauris (2010).. . .

  Direct Link   Download 51 Minutes 25 Jul 2015

E193 | From Baghdad to Cairo to Edirne, hospitals were major and integral components of medieval and early modern Islamic cities. But what role did they play in these cities and their societies? Were they sites for the development of medical knowledge? In this podcast, Professor Ahmed Ragab examines the history and significance of hospitals in Mamluk Egypt and Syria. He argues that we must view these medieval hospitals as charitable institutions that provided needed services and drugs to the urban poor, rather than the early progenitors of our modern medical institutions. Over the course of the interview we explore how these hospitals functioned as charitable institutions, what type of medical theories and treatments they employed, why medieval rulers regarded them as so important, and why their importance decreased after the sixteenth century. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/07/islamic-hospitals-in-medieval-egypt-and.html Ahmed Ragab is Richard T. Watson Assistant Professor of Science and Religion at Harvard Divinity School. His book, The Medieval Islamic Hospital: Medicine, Religion, and Charity is available from Cambridge University Press as of September 2015. Release date: 26 July 2015 Location: Harvard University Editing and Production by Chris Gratien Bibliography courtesy of Ahmed Ragab SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY Ragab, Ahmed. The Medieval Islamic Hospital: Medicine, Religion and Charity. Newark: Cambridge University Press, 2015. http://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/religion/islam/medieval-islamic-hospital-medicine-religion-and-charity?format=HB Dols, Michael W. "The Origins of the Islamic Hospital: Myth and Reality." Bulletin of the History of Medicine 61, (1987): 367-390 Horden, Peregrine. "The Earliest Hospitals in Byzantium, Western Europe and Islam." Journal of Interdisciplinary History 35, no. 3 (2005): 361-89. Pormann, Peter E. "Islamic Hospitals in the Time of Al-Muqtadir." In Abbasid Studies Ii: Occasional Papers of the School of Abbasid Studies, Leuven, 28 June-1 July 2004, edited by John A. Nawas, 337-81. Leuven: Uitgeverij Peeters en Departement Oosterse Studies, 2010. Pormann, Peter E. "Medical Methodology and Hospital Practice: The Case of Fourth-/Tenth-Century Baghdad." In In the Age of Al-Farabi: Arabic Philosophy in the Fourth-Tenth Century, edited by Peter Adamson, 95-118. London: Warburg Institute, 2008. Shefer-Mossensohn, Miri. Ottoman Medicine: Healing and Medical Institutions, 1500-1700. Albany: SUNY Press, 2009.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 35 Minutes 04 Jul 2015

E192 | Bathhouses or hamams are a well-known feature of the Ottoman city typically associated with leisure. However, as our guest Nina Ergin explains, the history of hamams also provides a window onto many socioeconomic and political issues in the Ottoman Empire. In this episode, we discuss her research regarding the hamams of Istanbul during the mid-eighteenth century, what they tell us about the political economy and demographic makeup of the Ottoman capital, and how mapping hamams onto the landscape of Ottoman Istanbul can raise new questions about the social history of the city. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/p/urban-space-in-ottoman-world.html Nina Ergin is Associate Professor in the Department of Archaeology and History of Art at Koç University, specializing in the history of Ottoman architecture. Her work particularly revolves around monuments that have a strong social dimension, such as hamams, soup kitchens and hospitals, as well as around the sensory dimensions of the Ottoman built environment. Chris Gratien is a doctoral candidate at Georgetown University studying the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. His doctoral research examines the ecological transformation of the Adana region of Southern Turkey from the mid-19th century onward. Episode No. 192 Release date: 5 July 2015 Location: Feriköy, Istanbul Editing and Production by Chris Gratien Images courtesy of Nina Ergin Musical excerpt from Debo Band - Ambassel at freemusicarchive.org Bibliography: Nina Ergin with contributions by Yasemin Özarslan, “Mapping Istanbul’s Hamams of 1752 and Their Employees,” Bread from the Lion’s Mouth: Artisans Struggling for a Livelihood in Ottoman Cities, ed. Suraiya Faroqhi (New York, Oxford: Berghahn, 2015), 108-135. Nina Ergin, “The Albanian Tellâk Connection: Labor Migration to the Hamams of Eighteenth-Century Istanbul, Based on the 1752 İstanbul Hamâmları Defteri,” Turcica 43 (2011 [2012]): 229-254. Nina Ergin, “Bathing Business in Istanbul: A Case Study of the Çemberlitaş Hamamı in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries,” Bathing Culture of Anatolian Civilizations: Architecture, History and Imagination (Louvain: Peeters, 2011), 142-167. Nina Ergin, “Continuity and Change in Turkish Bathing Culture in Istanbul: The Life Story of the Çemberlitaş Hamam,” Turkish Studies 6 (2005): 93-112.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 58 Minutes 18 Apr 2015

E191 | Within nationalist understandings of Turkish identity, connections between Central Asia and the people of modern Turkey are often conceived of in terms of ancient genealogy of Turkic peoples. But as our guest in this episode of Ottoman History Podcast Lale Can illustrates, much more recent bonds forged not by ethnic but rather spiritual affinity during the Ottoman period point to enduring connections between Central Asia and the Ottoman Empire through migration and pilgrimage. In this episode, we discuss Dr. Can's work on Central Asians traveling in the Ottoman Empire and the transformation of travel and pilgrimage during the late nineteenth century century. Lale Can is Assistant Professor of History at The City College of New York, CUNY. She received her Ph.D. in 2012 from the Joint Program in History and Middle East & Islamic Studies at NYU and is currently working on her manuscript, tentatively titled Spiritual Citizens: Central Asians and the Politics of Protection and Pilgrimage in the Ottoman Empire, 1869-1914. Chris Gratien is a doctoral candidate at Georgetown University studying the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY Primary sources Muhammad Oxund Toshkandiy, Hajjnoma-i Turkiy, Biruni Institute of Oriental Studies, Tashkent, Uzbekistan. MS Turki IVANUz no. 12057. Üsküdar Sultantepesi’nde kâin Özbekler Dergahının Nüfus ve Kayıt Defteri fî 1 Zilkade 1316 fî 1 Mart 1315 [entries for 13 March 1899 through 9 December 1906] Sultantepe Özbekler Tekkesi Private Archive. Secondary sources Brower, Daniel. “Russian Roads to Mecca: Religious Tolerance and Muslim Pilgrimage,” Slavic Review, vol. 55, no. 3 (Autumn, 1996), 567-584. Can, Lale. “Connecting People: The Sultantepe Özbekler Tekke and Nineteenth-Century Ottoman-Central Asian Interactions.” Modern Asian Studies, Vol. 46, part 2, March 2012. Republished in Sites of Asian Interaction: Ideas, Networks and Mobility, eds Sunil Amrith and Tim Harper (Cambridge University Press, 2014). Green, Nile. "Spacetime and the Muslim Journey West: Industrial Communications in the Making of the 'Muslim World'", American Historical Review 118, 2 (2013). Green, Nile. "The Rail Hajjis: The Trans-Siberian Railway and the Long Way to Mecca", in Venetia Porter (ed.), Hajj: Collected Essays (British Museum, 2013). Kane, Eileen. “Odessa as Hajj Hub, 1880s-1910s” in Russia in Motion: Cultures of Human Mobility since 1850, edited by John Randolph and Eugene M. Avrutin (University of Illinois Press, 2012). Khalid, Adeeb. “Pan-Islamism in practice: The rhetoric of Muslim unity and its uses” in Elisabeth Özdalga (ed.) Late Ottoman Society: The Intellectual Legacy (RoutledgeCurzon, 2005). Le Gall, Dina. A Culture of Sufism: Naqshbandis in the Ottoman World, 1450-1700 (SUNY Press, 2005). McChesney, Robert D. “The Central Asian Hajj-Pilgrimage in the Time of the Early Modern Empires,” in Safavid Iran and Her Neighbors, ed. Michel Mazzaoui (University of Utah Press, 2003), 129-156. Meyer, James. “Immigration, Return and the Politics of Citizenship: Russian Muslims in the Ottoman Empire, 1860-1914,” IJMES 39 (2007), 15-32. Norihiro Naganawa, “The Hajj Making Geopolitics, Empire, and Local Politics: A View from the Volga-Ural Region at the Turn of the 19th and 20th Centuries, in A.Papas, T. Welford, and T. Zarcone (eds), Central Asian Pilgrims: Hajj Routes and Pious Visits between Central Asia and the Hijaz (Klaus Schwarz Verlag, 2011). Thum, Rian. The Sacred Routes of Uyghur History (Harvard University Press, 2014). MUSIC from freemusicarchive.org Zainab Palvanova - Ofarin / https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Zainab_Palvanova/ Alash Ensemble - Dyngyldai (Live on WFMU's Transpacific Sound Paradise on 7/24/09) / http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Alash_Ensemble/Live_on_WFMUs_Transpacific_Sound_Paradise_on_72409/. . .

  Direct Link   Download 48 Minutes 11 Apr 2015

E190 | For more than a century, waves of Armenian migrants have come to the United States variously seeking economic opportunity or fleeing political violence and persecution. In this episode, Susanna Ferguson sits down with David Gutman to discuss his research on the origins of Armenian migration to the United States and elsewhere during the late Ottoman period, and they explore how shifts in migration patterns reflected the broader political shifts in the empire during its last decades. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/03/ottoman-armenian-migration-united-states.html David Gutman is an Assistant Professor at Manhattanville College in Purchase, NY. He completed his PhD at Binghamton University with a dissertation titled, "Sojourners, Smugglers, and the State: Transhemispheric Migration Flows and the Politics of Mobility in Eastern Anatolia, 1888-1908." His teaching interests include the history of the modern Middle East, global history, social and political movements, and migration. His research interests revolve around the politics of migration and migration control, the intersection of mobility and citizenship, social and political history of Ottoman peripheries, and Ottoman Armenians in the last decades of empire. Susanna Ferguson is a PhD student in Middle Eastern History at Columbia University, where she focuses on the history of women and gender in the Arab world in the late 19th and early 20th centuries (see Academia.edu). Bibliography Akçam, Taner and Ümit Kurt. Kanunların Ruhu: Emval-i Metruke Kanunlarında Soykırımın İzini Sürmek. (Istanbul, 2012). Der Matossian, Bedross. Shattered Dreams of Revolution: From Liberty to Violence in the Late Ottoman Empire. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2014. Gutman, David. “Agents of Mobility: Migrant Smuggling Networks, Transhemispheric Migration, and Time-Space Compression in Ottoman Anatolia, 1888-1908.” Interdisciplines, 1 (2012), pp. 48-84. Gutman, David. “Armenian Migration to North America, State Power, and Local Politics in the Late Ottoman Empire.” Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Vol 34, No. 1 (forthcoming, Spring 2014). Khater, Akram Fouad. Inventing Home: Emigration, Gender, and the Middle Class in Lebanon, 1870-1920. (Berkeley, 2001). Mirak, Robert. Torn Between Two Lands: Armenians in America 1890 to World War I (Cambridge, 1983).. . .

  Direct Link   Download 50 Minutes 02 Apr 2015

E189 | Countries, much like companies, must seek to present a certain image to the outside world in order to achieve certain political and economic goals. As our guest in this episode, Aslı Iğsız, demonstrates, this self-presentation can take the form of full-fledged marketing campaigns. In this episode, we explore the marketing policies and strategies adopted in Turkey and the broader Middle East during the past two decades and reflect on how they various match, contradict, and intersect with politics in practice. Aslı Iğsız is Assistant Professor of Culture and Representation in the Department of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at New York University. Chris Gratien is a doctoral candidate at Georgetown University researching the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. Nicholas Danforth is a doctoral candidate at Georgetown University studying the history of modern Turkey Music: Seyyan Hanım - Mazi Debo Band - Ambassel (http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Debo_Band/Live_on_WFMUs_Transpacific_Sound_Paradise_with_Bob_Weisberg_12122009/) BIBLIOGRAPHY Aronczyk, Melissa. Branding the Nation: The Global Business of National Identity. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Brown, Wendy. Regulating Aversion: Tolerance in the Age of Identity and Empire. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2006. Iğsız, Aslı. “Palimpsests of Multiculturalism and ‘Museumization of Culture’: The Greek-Turkish Population Exchange Museum as an Istanbul 2010 European Capital of Culture Project.” Comparative Studies in South Asian, African, and Middle Eastern Studies. (Forthcoming August 2015) Iğsız, Aslı. “From Alliance of Civilizations to Branding the Nation: Turkish Studies, Image Wars, and Politics of Comparison in an Age of Neoliberalism.” Turkish Studies. Special Issue, “Turkish Studies from an Interdisciplinary Perspective." 15:4 (December 2014), 689-704. Iğsız, Aslı. “Brand Turkey and the Gezi Protests: Authoritarianism in Flux, Law, and Neoliberalism,” in The Making of a Protest Movement in Turkey: #Occupy Gezi. Ed. Umut Özkırımlı. (London and New York: Palgrave MacMillan). 2014. [revised version of two previously published Jadaliyya pieces: “Brand Turkey and the Gezi Protests: Authoritarianism, Law, and Neoliberalism” Part One and Two. Jadaliyya. 12-13 July 2013].. . .

  Direct Link   Download 49 Minutes 25 Mar 2015

E188 | The association of Algeria with sex figured prominently in the artwork and literature that was critiqued so famously by Edward Said in Orientalism. In this episode, Dr. Aurelie Perrier discusses the practical backdrop of this argument beyond the level of discourse by exploring illicit sex in 19th century Algeria under both Ottoman and French rule. Beginning with the fluid boundaries of Ottoman-administered sex work, she describes the transformations that accompanied French colonialism beginning in 1830. Contextualizing the sex trade in both eras with flows of labor migration, Perrier also illuminates the spatial dynamics of the French approach to prostitution, namely the birth of red-light districts and brothels. At once centralizing and segregating sex work, this new politics of space was intimately connected to the boundaries of race and class that were the premise of colonialism in the first place. Yet it appears in many cases these boundaries were transgressed, undermining the credibility of the colonial state. Moreover, even as the state claimed unprecedented control over the intimate lives of its citizens/subjects, people still managed to use the system for their own purposes, or evade it altogether. Still, the undeniable encroachment of the state left an indelible mark on Algeria's history with distinctly gendered implications. Aurelie Perrier is a recent PhD graduate in Middle East history from Georgetown University. Her dissertation examined the politics of gender in nineteenth and early twentieth-century colonial Algeria. Her broader research interests center on private life, the management of sexuality and the production of sentiment in colonial settings as well as on the construction of imperial masculinity. Sam Dolbee is a doctoral candidate in the department of Middle East Studies at New York University. Episode Music: Mustafa Hürerses - Mukaddes Günah Debo Band - Ambassel - http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Debo_Band/Live_on_WFMUs_Transpacific_Sound_Paradise_with_Bob_Weisberg_12122009/ Selma Devrim - Sen BIBLIOGRAPHY Germaine Aziz, Les chambres closes: histoire d'une prostituée juive d'Algérie, edited by Christelle Taraud (Paris, Nouveau Monde: 2007) Christelle Taraud, La prostitution coloniale au Maghreb: Algérie, Tunisie, Maroc, 1830-1962 (Paris, Payot: 2003) Ferhati Berkahoum, " la danseuse prostituee dite "Ouled Nail," entre mythe et realité (1830-1962). Des rapports sociaux et des pratiques concrètes," CLIO. Histoire, femmes et societés 17 (2003) Bruce W. Dunne, "French Regulation of Prostitution in Nineteenth-Century Colonial Algeria, Arab Studies Journal 2, no.1 (Spring 1994): 24-30. More at http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com. . .

  Direct Link   Download 71 Minutes 17 Mar 2015

E187 | The songs and melodies of the Turkey's Alevi communities derive from a long history of song-making in Anatolia that is embedded in local geographies and indelibly tied to notions of worship and belonging. So what happens when, through migration and media, that music enters an entirely new context? In this episode, we sit down with ethnomusicologist and musician Ozan Aksoy to discuss to his research on Kurdish Alevi music in diasporic contexts and hear him perform some of his favorite selections live in the OHP studio. Ozan Aksoy holds a PhD in Ethnomusicology from CUNY, Graduate Center, where he currently a postdoctoral fellow at the Middle East and Middle Eastern Center. He is also currently an instructor at New York University’s SPS-McGhee Division. Chris Gratien is a doctoral candidate at Georgetown University researching the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. Ceren Erdem is a curator based in New York and Istanbul. She received has an M.A. in Modern Art: Critical and Curatorial Studies from Columbia University an MFA from Sabanci University, Istanbul. She has curated online projects and publications, and onsite exhibitions in New York, Istanbul, and Seoul. For more: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/03/music-kurdish-alevi-migration.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 42 Minutes 13 Mar 2015

E186 | Students of Ottoman history might tend to think of the Medieval Period in Anatolia as a precursor to the Ottoman, in other words, reading the region's medieval past through the teleological lens of the Ottoman rise. However, recent scholarship on Medieval Anatolia, especially the Seljuk and Mongol periods, has moved towards a different approach that argues for the study of this complex geography and period in its own right. In this episode, Sara Nur Yıldız makes the argument for Medieval Anatolia and explores new developments in the political, social, and cultural history of the field. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/03/medieval-anatolia-seljuk-mongol-ottoman.html Sara Nur Yıldız (PhD, University of Chicago, 2006) is an affiliated researcher at the Orient-Institut Istanbul and Research Fellow at St Andrews University on the project ‘Islamisation of Anatolia, c. 1100-1500’ https://www.islam-anatolia.ac.uk. A historian of medieval Anatolia, she is currently working on the intellectual and religious history of medieval Islamic Anatolia, spanning the Seljuk and early Ottoman periods, with a focus on textual production and circulation, the transfer of Islamic knowledge and learning, manuscript culture, vernacularization and medical texts. Chris Gratien is a doctoral candidate at Georgetown University researching the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. Select Bibliography Beihammer, Alexander D. “Defection across the Border of Islam and Christianity: Apostasy and Cross-Cultural Interactions in Byzantine-Seljuk Relations.” Speculum 86 (2011): 597-651. Blessing, Patricia. Rebuilding Anatolia after the Mongol Conquest. Islamic Architecture in the Lands of Rūm, 1240-1330. Surrey and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2014. Goshgarian, Rachel. “Opening and Closing: Associations based on futuwwa in late medieval Anatolian cities.” British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies 30, no. 1 (2013): 36-52. Korobeinikov, Dimitri. Byzantium and the Turks in the Thirteenth Century. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014. Pancaroğlu, Oya. “Devotion, Hospitality and Architecture in Medieval Anatolia.” Studia Islamica 108 (2013): 48-81. Peacock, A.C.S. and Sara Nur Yıldız, eds. The Seljuks of Anatolia: Court and Society in the Medieval Middle East. London and New York: I.B. Tauris, 2013; paperback version, 2015. Peacock, A.C.S., Bruno De Nicola, and Sara Nur Yıldız, eds. Islam and Christianity in Medieval Anatolia. Aldershot, Hampshire, England, and Burlington, Vt: Ashgate, 2015. Peacock, Andrew C. S. “Sinop: A Frontier City in Seljuq and Mongol Anatolia.” Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to Siberia 16 (2010): 103-124. Peacock, A.C.S. “Court and Nomadic Life in Saljuq Anatolia.” In David Durand-Guédy, ed. Turko-Mongol Rulers, Cities and City Life. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2013, 191-222. Peacock, A.C.S. “The Seljuk Sultanate of Rūm and the Turkmen of the Byzantine frontier, 1206-1279.” Al-Masaq 26, no. 3 (2014): 267-287. Redford, Scott. Legends of Authority. The 1215 Seljuk Inscriptions of the Sinop Citadel, Turkey. Istanbul: Koç University Press, 2014. Trepanier, Nicholas. Foodways and Daily Life in Medieval Anatolia: A New Social History. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2014. Yalman, Suzan. “ ‘Ala al-Din Kayqubad Illuminated: A Rum Seljuq Sultan as Cosmic Ruler.” Muqarnas 29, no. 1 (2012): 151-186. Yıldız, Sara Nur. “Manuel Komnenos Maurozomes and His Descendants at the Seljuk Court: The Formation of a Christian Seljuk-Komnenian Elite.” In Stefen Leder, ed. Crossroads between Latin Europe and the Near East: Corollaries of the Frankish Presence in the Eastern Mediterranean (12th to 14th Centuries). Würzburg: Ergon Verlag, 2011, 55-77. Yıldız, Sara Nur. “From Cairo to Ayasuluk: Hacı Paşa and the transmission of Islamic learning to western Anatolia in the late 14th century.” Journal of Islamic Studies 25, no. 3. (2014): 263-297.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 53 Minutes 14 Feb 2015

E185 | Pan-Turkism rose to prominence as a political ideology during the early twentieth century, heavily influenced by Muslim intellectuals that traveled between the Russian and Ottoman spheres. For many of these figures such as Yusuf Akçura, Ismail Gasprinski, and Ahmet Ağaoğlu, Pan-Turkism became the political movement that defined their legacies. However, as James Meyer explains in his new monograph entitled "Turks Across Empires", these intellectuals engaged with numerous other issues of the period well before becoming the Pan-Turkists they are remembered as today. In this episode, Nir Shafir and Ella Fratantuono talk to James Meyer about this research and explore what the history of the Pan-Turkists tells us about the broader sociopolitical connections between Russia and the Ottoman Empire. James H. Meyer is an assistant professor of Islamic World History at Montana State University. He works on a range of topics relating to Turkey, the Ottoman Empire, and the Muslim communities of Russia. PUBLICATIONS OF JAMES MEYER Turks Across Empires: Marketing Muslim Identity in the Russian-Ottoman Borderlands (Oxford University Press, 2014). "Speaking Sharia to the State: Muslim Protesters, Tsarist officials, and the Islamic Discourses of Late Imperial Russia." Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History 14,3 (Summer 2013), 485-505. “The Economics of Muslim Cultural Reform: Money, Power, and Muslim Communities in Late Imperial Russia.” Book chapter appearing in Asiatic Russia: Imperial Power in Regional and International Contexts (Routledge, 2011). “Immigration, Return, and the Politics of Citizenship: Russian Muslims in the Ottoman Empire, 1860-1914,” International Journal of Middle East Studies, 39:1, February 2007, 15-32. For more: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/02/turks-across-empires.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 50 Minutes 01 Feb 2015

E184 | Hadi Hosainy ile 17. yüzyıl İstanbulu'nda kadın mülkiyet hakları üzerine konuştuğumuz bu podcastımızda kadınların hukuki yollara başvurarak nasıl kendilerini koruduklarına ve Osmanlı toplumunun şeri hukukun kadını dezavantajlı bir konuma iten kurallarının nasıl arkasından dolandığına değindik. Toplumsal cinsiyetin hukukun işleyişine etkilerini tartıştık. Hadi Hosainy University of Texas at Austin'de doktora çalışmalarına devam etmektedir. Yeni Çağ Akdeniz ve Osmanlı İmparatorluğu üzerine yoğunlaşan Dr. Emrah Safa Gürkan İstanbul 29 Mayıs Üniversitesi'nde öğretim üyeliği yapmaktadır. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/02/islamic-law-women-property-ottoman-empire.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 39 Minutes 17 Jan 2015

E183 | The story of the twelfth-century scholar Umaya b. `Abd al-`Aziz Abu al-Salt al-Dani al-Ishbili starts in al-Andalus but moves eastward, to Fatimid Cairo and Zirid Tunisia. His movement across the Mediterranean illustrates a west-east transmission of knowledge and intellectual culture. A prolific scholar trained in diverse fields, Abu al-Salt's story traces scholarly links between multiple medieval Islamic states. Professor Sumaiya Hamdani joins Graham Cornwell to discuss her work on Abu al-Salt and the historiography of intellectual culture in the medieval Mediterranean. More at: http://tajine.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/01/fatimid-egypt-tunisia-andalus.html Sumaiya Hamdani is Associate Professor of World History at George Mason University, and founder of the GMU Islamic Studies program. She is also the author of Between Revolution and State: The Construction of Fatimid Legitimacy, published in 2006. Graham H. Cornwell is a PhD Candidate in History at Georgetown University. His dissertation is entitled "Sweetening the Pot: A History of Tea and Taste in Morocco, 1856-1960. SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY Sumaiya Hamdani. "Worlds apart? An Andalusi in Fatimid Egypt." Journal of North African Studies 19.1 (2014): 56-67. Hamdani, Sumaiya. Between Revolution and State: The Path to Fatimid Statehood : Qadi Al-Nuʻman and the Construction of Fatimid Legitimacy. London: I. B. Tauris, 2006. Salma Khadra Jayyusi. The Legacy of Muslim Spain, Volume 1. Brill: 2000. Yaacov Lev. State and Society in Fatimid Egypt, Volume 1. Brill: 1991. Amin Maalouf. Leo Africanus. New Amsterdam Books: 1998. Stephen O' Shea. Sea of Faith: Islam and Christianity in the Medieval Mediterranean World. Walker: 2007.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 44 Minutes 08 Jan 2015

E182 | In this episode, Beth Baron discusses the historical context of the Muslim Brotherhood's rise during the interwar period and how the organization's activities and goals were shaped by the actions of European missionaries in Egypt. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2015/01/history-muslim-brotherhood-egypt.html Beth Baron is Professor of History at City University of New York (CUNY), the Graduate Center and direct of the Middle East and Middle Eastern American Center (MEMEAC). She has written extensively on the gender, the press, nationalism, and politics in modern Egypt. Chris Gratien is a doctoral candidate at Georgetown University researching the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. Susanna Ferguson is a PhD student in Middle Eastern History at Columbia University, where she focuses on the history of women and gender in the Arab world in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Select Publications of Beth Baron: The Orphan Scandal: Christian Missionaries and the Rise of the Muslim Brotherhood. Stanford University Press, 2014. Egypt As a Woman: Nationalism, Gender, and Politics. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005. The Women's Awakening in Egypt: Culture, Society, and the Press. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1994.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 43 Minutes 11 Dec 2014

E181 | The legal and social environments surrounding slavery and manumission during the early modern period varied from place to place and profession to profession. In this episode, Nur Sobers-Khan presents her exciting research on the lives of a particular population of slaves in Ottoman Galata during the late sixteenth century, how they were classified and documented under Ottoman law, and the terms by which they were able to achieve their freedom. Music: İnci Çayırlı - Kıskanıyorum ; İlhan Kızılay - Örenli Gelin Nur Sobers-Khan completed a PhD in Ottoman History in 2012 at the Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at the University Cambridge, having previous completing a BA in Oriental Studies (Arabic and Persian) at the same institution in 2006. Her PhD dissertation, entitled, ‘Slaves without Shackles: Forced Labour and Manumission in the Galata Court Registers: 1560-1572,’ was a microhistorical study of the social and cultural context of slavery in the early modern Ottoman Empire, using a selection of legal and archival documents as well as manuscripts in Arabic, Ottoman and Persian. From 2012 to 2013, Dr. Sobers-Khan was the Iran Heritage curator for Persian manuscripts at the British Library, where she was engaged in creating a digital reference tool for the Persian manuscripts held in the BL. She is currently working as a curator at the Museum of Islamic Art in Doha, Qatar, where she is responsible for the collection of manuscripts and art of the Ottoman Empire. Chris Gratien is a doctoral candidate at Georgetown University researching the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. Nir Shafir is a doctoral candidate at UCLA studying Ottoman intellectual history. See: Sobers-Khan, Nur. Slaves Without Shackles Forced Labour and Manumission in the Galata Court Registers, 1560-1572. Berlin: Klaus-Schwarz-Vlg, 2014. For complete bibliography and more, visit http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2014/12/slavery-istanbul-ottoman-empire.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 53 Minutes 20 Nov 2014

E180 | How have the immense transformations of the nineteenth century impacted Egyptian state and society? Our guest Dr. Khaled Fahmy has devoted much of his work to the study of that very question in the realms of military, medicine, and in this episode, law, which is the subject of his forthcoming book. In this episode, we explore the emergence to of new legal institutions under Mehmed Ali's government in Egypt and ask Dr. Fahmy what this meant for Egypt and how it fits into the broader changes afoot in the Ottoman world. Khaled Fahmy is Professor of History at the American University of Cairo and 2014-2015 Carnegie Centennial Fellow at Columbia University. He is the author of All the Pasha's Men: Mehmed Ali, His Army, and the Making of Modern Egypt (AUC Press, 2010). His new book, tentatively entitled A Sense of History: Law and Medicine in Modern Egypt, is forthcoming from the University of California Press. Susanna Ferguson is a PhD student in Middle Eastern History at Columbia University, where she focuses on the history of women and gender in the Arab world in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2014/11/law-crime-ottoman-egypt-fahmy.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 47 Minutes 14 Nov 2014

E179 | Hristiyan, Müslüman, Yahudi gibi kesin hatlarla birbirinden ayrılmış kimliklerin hüküm sürdüğü çağımızın aksine Osmanlı toplumunda özellikle devlet gücünün erişmediği yerlerde bu kimlikler arasında geçişkenlik çok fazlaydı. Bu bölümümüzde Dr. Zeynep Türkyılmaz ile Osmanlı toplumunda gizli hırıstiyanlar olarak adlandırabileceğimiz iki din arasında sıkışmış, çift kimlikli cemaatleri mercek altına alacağız. Kökleri 17. yüzyıla dayanan ve Islahat Fermanı'nın verdiği güvencelerle birer birer ortaya çıkan bu cemaatlere merkezi devletin nasıl bir tepki verdiğini tartışacağız. Dr. Zeynep Türkyılmaz Dartmouth College'da öğretim üyeliği yapmaktadır. Yeni Çağ Akdeniz ve Osmanlı İmparatorluğu üzerine yoğunlaşan Dr. Emrah Safa Gürkan İstanbul 29 Mayıs Üniversitesi'nde öğretim üyeliği yapmaktadır. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2014/11/gizli-hristiyanlik.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 37 Minutes 06 Nov 2014

E178 | Iraq was located on the periphery of the Ottoman Empire. Yet, as the main interface between the Ottoman and Safavid realms, it was also a region of tremendous importance for the Ottoman state. In this episode, Dina Khoury discusses her work on Ottoman Iraq, and explores how Ottoman war and politics influenced the socioeconomic life of the provinces of Mosul, Baghdad, and Basra. Dina Rizk Khoury is Professor of History and International Affairs at George Washington University. Her research focuses on both Ottoman and contemporary Iraq. Faisal Husain is a doctoral student at Georgetown University researching the environmental history of Ottoman Iraq. For more: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2014/11/history-iraq-ottoman-empire.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 62 Minutes 30 Oct 2014

E177 | The 1870 Crémieux Decree extended French citizenship to most, but not all, of Algeria's Jewish population. The Jews of the M'zab Valley were excluded from this legislation. As Professor Sarah Abrevaya Stein explains in this episode, this was due to a complex web of historical confluences including the chronology of conquest, shifting military and administrative structures for French Algerian rule, and perceptions of Jewish, Arab and Berber indigeneity. This story, while anchored in the local, participates in wider discussions of international Jewish philanthropies, decolonization, citizenship, belonging and marginality amid rapidly shifting global conditions. Sarah Abrevaya Stein is a professor in the Department of History and Maurice Amado Endowed Chair in Sephardic Studies at UCLA. In addition to Saharan Jews and the Fate of French Algeria (University of Chicago Press, 2014), she has written a number of award-winning books and articles including Plumes: Ostrich Feathers, Jews and a Lost World of Global Commerce (Yale University Press, 2008), winner of the Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature. She is the co-editor of Sephardi Lives: a Documentary History, 1700-1950 (Stanford University Press, 2014), a primary source reader of over 150 documents translated from fifteen different languages into English along with Professor Julia Phillips Cohen of Vanderbilt University. Alma Rachel Heckman is a Ph.D. candidate at UCLA's history department. Her dissertation is entitled "Radical Nationalists: Moroccan Jewish Communists 1945-1975" and concerns Jewish engagement in Morocco's national liberation movement, intertwined with global political developments and migrations. More at: http://tajine.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2014/10/jews-saharan-french-algeria.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 42 Minutes 26 Oct 2014

E176 | Osmanlı'da çocukluk algısının olup olmadığı son dönem tarih yazıcılığında sıkça sorulan sorular arasındadır. Bu bölümde Yahya Araz bize çocukların sadece küçük insanlar olmanın ötesinde Osmanlı'da çocukluk tanımının çerçevesini oluşturan toplumsal, hukuki ve biyoljik etmenleri anlatıyor. Dr. Yahya Araz Dokuz Eylül Üniversitesi'nde öğretim üyeliği yapmaktadır. Kalliopi Amygdalou, doktora derecesini University College London'a bağlı Barlett School of Architecture'dan aldı. Araştırmaları, Yunanistan ve Türkiye'de ulusal tarih yazımı, mimari ve kentsel çevre ilişkisine odaklanmaktadır. Erken modern Osmanlı dünyasında mekân, birey ve görüntü ilişkisi üzerine çalışan Dr. Serkan Şavk, İzmir Ekonomi Üniversitesi Sinema ve Dijital Medya Bölümü'nde görev yapmaktadır. Daha fazlası: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2014/10/osmanlda-cocukluk-evlilik.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 50 Minutes 17 Oct 2014

E175 | The war in Syria has displaced millions of people, claimed hundreds of thousands of lives, and disrupted the education of countless students. In this interview, Keith Watenpaugh, a historian who has also researched the situation of Syrian students in Jordan, Lebanon, and Turkey, discusses the issues this young people face. He places the obstacles confronting the “lost generations” of Syrian students within the context of other recent refugee crises. The series of reports by Keith Watenpaugh and his team members James King and Adrienne Fricke are reachable through our website http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com. Keith Watenpaugh is a historian of the Modern Middle East and Associate Professor of Modern Islam, Human Rights & Peace at University of California-Davis. Chris Gratien is a doctoral candidate at Georgetown University researching the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. See more at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2014/10/syrian-university-students.html#sthash.8TfEr1jK.dpuf. . .

  Direct Link   Download 34 Minutes 23 Sep 2014

E174 | The late 19th century was a time of intellectual and cultural flourishing for the Armenian community in Constantinople, as a new generation of Armenian thinkers traveled to Europe to study, debated new ideas in the press, and settled on a new vernacular for their literary endeavors. Zabel Yessayan was one of the most important female figures of this generation, publishing articles on subjects including educational reform, art and aesthetics, and the question of women. In this podcast, Jennifer Manoukian discusses her new translation of Yessayan's memoir, The Gardens of Silihdar, and explores questions of women, gender, and politics in Yessayan's work. Jennifer Manoukian is a translator of Western Armenian literature. She has an MA in Middle Eastern, South Asian and African Studies from Columbia University. The Gardens of Silihdar by Zabel Yessayan, was released by AIWA Press in 2014. Susanna Ferguson is a PhD student in Middle Eastern History at Columbia University, where she focuses on the history of women and gender in the Arab world in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2014/09/zabel-yessayan.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 68 Minutes 12 Sep 2014

E173 | Ondokuzuncu yüzyılda gelişen üretim teknolojisiyle, sigaraya yönelik rağbet tütün üretiminde büyük bir artışa yol açtı. Osmanlı’nın son döneminde gerek yerel gerekse uluslararası pazarların taleplerini arza dönüştürme çabası sonucunda 1880’lerden itibaren Osmanlı’da tütün üretimi daha önceki onyıllara oranla üç kat artış gösterdi. Hiç şüphesiz üretimdeki bu ani artış, tütünün coğrafi ve iklimsel olarak en iyi kalitede yetiştiriebildiği İskeçe, Kavala ve Samsun gibi tarımsal bölgelerle ile fabrika üretiminin gerçekleştirildiği İstanbul’da tütün üretiminde çalışan yerel ve mevsimlik işçi sayısında büyük bir artışı beraberinde getirdi. Tütün üretimindeki artışın en önemli unsurlarından ve üretimin temeli olan yerel ve mevsimlik işçilerin yaşam ve çalışma koşulları, tütün emeğinin bu dönemdeki örgütlenmesi ve emek süreci mücadelelerini Can Nacar’la konuştuk. Dr. Can Nacar, Koç Üniversitesi'nin Tarih Bölümünde Öğretim Üyesisidir. Seçil Yılmaz, CUNY Tarih Bölümü’nde Doktora Öğrencisi. Geç Osmanlı İmparatorluğu ve Cumhuriyet Dönemi’nde salgın hastalıklar, tıp ve toplumsal cinsiyet temaları çerçevesinde frenginin sosyal tarihi üzerine doktora araştırmasına devam etmektedir. Fazlası: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2014/09/osmanlda-tutun-iscileri.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 54 Minutes 10 Aug 2014

E169 | The movements of celestial bodies had long been of tremendous importance within the social and religious spheres throughout the Muslim world. As new understandings of space and time began to emerge during the nineteenth century, longstanding astronomical practices in places such as Egypt witnessed a profound transformation. In this episode, Daniel Stolz discusses the importance of astronomy in nineteenth-century Egypt and the overlapping scientific traditions they practiced. Daniel Stolz is a postdoctoral fellow in the Program in Science in Human Culture and Department of History at Northwestern University. His research examines the history of science, technology, and Islam since the eighteenth century. Nir Shafir is a doctoral candidate at UCLA studying Ottoman intellectual history. For more: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2014/08/history-astronomy-egypt-islam.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 29 Minutes 23 Jul 2014

The Wild Field E08 | Ottoman imperial space was not always tied to permanent structures. For centuries tents functioned as mobile palaces, providing domestic space and ceremonial stage settings reinforcing the power of the Padishah. Considering the material remains of fabric imperial architecture opens new avenues for exploring and understanding Ottoman visual culture and architectural history. Beyond the Empire, Ottoman tents changed hands as war booty and spolia during conflicts with neighboring polities, which resulted in a rich afterlife for many of these objects. Join Ashley Dimmig in The Wild Field in her exploration of Ottoman tents.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 58 Minutes 13 Jul 2014

E164 | Tanzimat’in ilanıyla beraber gündelik hayatın pekçok alanına nüfuz etmeyi hedefleyen yasal uygulamalar eczane ve attar dükkanlarının tozlu raflarına kadar ulaşmayı başarmıştı. Bu bölümde Ebru Aykut, Tanzimat sonrası Osmanlı’sında zehir satışını düzenleyen uygulamalarla kocalarıyla hesaplaşmayı zehir yoluyla seçen kadınların kesişen hikayelerini anlatıyor. Geç Osmanlı dönemi taşrasında suç ve cezalandırma pratiklerinin sosyal-hukuki tarihi üzerine çalışmalarını sürdüren Dr. Ebru Aykut, Mimar Sinan Güzel Sanatlar Üniversitesi Sosyoloji Bölümü'nde öğretim üyesidir. Yeniçağ Akdeniz ve Osmanlı İmparatorluğu üzerine uzmanlaşan Dr. Emrah Safa Gürkan İstanbul 29 Mayıs Üniversitesi'nde öğretim üyeliği yapmaktadır. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2014/07/poison-murder-women-ottoman-empire.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 38 Minutes 04 Jul 2014

E162 | With increased connections between polities on all sides of the Mediterranean during the early modern period, the importance of translators and translation grew to facilitate diplomatic and economic relations. In this episode, Claire Gilbert explores the world of diplomacy in the Western Mediterranean of the sixteenth century the role of translators in this zone of contact. Claire Gilbert is a doctoral candidate in the Department of History at UCLA. Nir Shafir is a doctoral candidate at UCLA studying Ottoman intellectual history. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2014/03/translation-mediterranean.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 56 Minutes 12 Jun 2014

E159 | Yüzyıllar boyunca Tanrı’nın kimi zaman gizemi kimi zaman gazabı varsayılan delilik ve deliler, ondokuzuncu yüzyıl modernleşme düşüncesi ve pratikleri ile tıbbın ve psikiyatrinin temel konusu oldu. Deliliğin modern anlamda biyolojik nedenleri icat ve mekanları inşa edildi. Tanzimat’la beraber, tıbbi pratikler ve kamu sağlığı toplumsal düzenin sağlamanın temel araçlarından biri haline gelince, deliliğin ve delilerin Süleymaniye Medresesi’nde başlayan tarihi 1873’te Toptaşı Bimarhanesi’ne ve oradan da bugünkü Bakırköy Ruh ve Sinir Hastalıkları Hastahanesi’ne taşındı. Bu bölümde, Fatih Artvinli ile Osmanlı’nın son yüzyılında deliliğin Osmanlı toplumundaki anlamı ve mekanları üzerinden siyaset ve toplumla olan ilişkisini ele aldık. Yrd. Doç. Dr. Fatih Artvinli, Acıbedem Üniversitesi Tıp Tarihi ve Etik Anabilim Dalı Öğretim Üyesisidir. Fatih Artvinli'nin yayımlanmış iki kitabı bulunmaktadır: Seraba Harcanmış Bir Ömür: Osman Bölükbaşı (Kitap Yayınevi, 2007) Delilik, Siyaset ve Toplum: Toptaşı Bimarhanesi (Boğaziçi Üniversitesi Yayınevi, 2013) Seçil Yılmaz, The Gradute Center, CUNY Tarih Bölümü’nde Doktora Öğrencisi. Geç Osmanlı İmparatorluğu ve Erken Cumhuriyet Dönemi’nde salgın hastalıklar, tıp ve toplumsal cinsiyet temaları çerçevesinde frenginin sosyal tarihi üzerine doktora araştırmasına devam etmektedir. Daha fazlası için: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2014/06/psychiatry-ottoman-empire-madness.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 55 Minutes 06 Jun 2014

E158 | While humans have devised no shortage of ways to punish each other throughout history, the rise of the prison and incarceration as a method for dealing with crime is primarily a nineteenth century phenomenon. In this episode, Kent Schull discusses his recent book about the development of the Ottoman prison system and explores the lives of Ottoman prisoners. Kent Schull is Associate Professor of History at State University of New York, Binghamton. Chris Gratien is a doctoral candidate at Georgetown University researching the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. Ottoman History Podcast is a weekly internet radio program edited and produced by Chris Gratien. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2014/06/prison-ottoman-empire-crime.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 59 Minutes 30 May 2014

E157 | While architectural historians are often concerned with the design, inception, and construction of buildings and objects, writing the history of architecture also includes the study of renovations, modifications, and changes in use of such spaces embedded in political and social contexts. In this episode, Heghnar Watenpaugh revisits her 2004 monograph entitled The Image of an Ottoman City in a discussion of Ottoman interventions into the historical urban geography of the empire's third largest city, Aleppo, and talks about methods of reconstructing the lived urban environment of a city in Ottoman Syria. Heghnar Watenpaugh is an Associate Professor of Art History at University of California-Davis. Chris Gratien is a doctoral candidate at Georgetown University researching the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. Emily Neumeier is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Art History at the University of Pennsylvania researching art and architecture in the Ottoman world. Ottoman History Podcast is an internet radio program edited and produced by Chris Gratien. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2014/05/ottoman-aleppo-syria-history.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 48 Minutes 08 May 2014

E152 | In daily life, time appears as an unavoidable fact. It marches forward uniformly, and much like money, is a fungible commodity that can be spent, wasted, and saved. However, this view often obscures the fact that our engagement with time is mitigated through socially-constructed ways of understanding, measuring, and using time. In this episode, Chris Gratien talks to Anver Wishnizter about his research in this realm of social time--what he describes as "temporal culture"--and the changes in such a temporal culture during the late Ottoman period.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 57 Minutes 03 May 2014

E151 | Istanbul is full of landmarks and objects dating to the Ottoman period that give us a glimpse of the city's material culture. However, the scents and sounds that made up the urban experience of Ottoman Istanbul often elude us. In our inaugural episode of Season 4, we explore the sounds of Istanbul today and link them to city of the Ottoman past. Chris Gratien is a doctoral candidate at Georgetown University researching the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. Emily Neumeier is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Art History at the University of Pennsylvania researching art and architecture in the Ottoman world. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2014/05/sounds-history-istanbul.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 46 Minutes 21 Mar 2014

E150 | Much has been written about shifts in the concept of childhood and the structure of families, particularly for the period following industrialization. However, seldom do the voices and experiences of children find their way into historical narratives. In this podcast, Nazan Maksudyan offers some insights about how to approach the history of children and childhood and discusses the lives of Ottoman children during the empire's last decades. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2014/03/children-childhood-ottoman-empire-turkey.html. . .

  Direct Link   Download 28 Minutes 05 Mar 2014

E064 | Dreams are an essential part of the human experience but are attributed different significance in various times and places. For many Ottomans, dreams were a forum for the revelation of hidden or unseen knowledge, and dream narratives as well as their interpretations found their way into many Ottoman texts. In this podcast, Aslı Niyazioğlu explains the role of dreams within Ottoman society, focusing on dream narratives in biographical dictionaries of the early modern era, and we discuss possible changes over time in the understanding of dreams in the Ottoman world. - See more at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2012/08/dreams-in-ottoman-society-culture-and.html#sthash.sseHwAj3.dpuf. . .

  Direct Link   Download 43 Minutes 05 Mar 2014

E071 | While almost all of the well-known authors of the Ottoman period are men, women also participated in Ottoman intellectual circles as authors and artists. In this podcast, Didem Havlioğlu describes the world of early modern Ottoman intellectuals and discusses how we can study the cultural of production of women within this context. - See more at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2012/09/women-literati-and-ottoman-intellectual.html#sthash.DndmalTp.dpuf. . .

  Direct Link   Download 55 Minutes 04 Mar 2014

E098 | The image of prostitution as humanity's "oldest profession" often obscures the fact that this phenomenon has carried different social meaning and economic value across time and space. In this episode, Dr. Gary Leiser explores social understandings of prostitution in the Eastern Mediterranean between various political and legal frameworks during the medieval period. - See more at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2013/03/prostitution-middle-east-islamic-law-society.html#sthash.BxS0P4yP.dpuf. . .

  Direct Link   Download 46 Minutes 04 Mar 2014

E095 | Printing in Ottoman Turkish first emerged during the eighteenth century. Yet, even when print had arrived in full force by the middle of the nineteenth century, it remained forbidden to print the text most sought after by Ottoman readers: the Qur'an. In this episode, Brett Wilson discusses the rise of print and Qur'an printing in the Ottoman Empire as well as the emergence of Turkish translations of the Qur'an in the late Ottoman and early Republican eras. - See more at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2013/03/quran-koran-ottoman-empire-printing-translation-turkish.html#sthash.0iFtdVb4.dpuf. . .

  Direct Link   Download 32 Minutes 04 Mar 2014

E089 | Günümüzde tarihin nasıl algılandığı, yeniden üretildiği, sembolize ve politize edildiği tartışılırken, geçmiş toplumların kendi geçmişlerini nasıl algıladıkları sıklıkla gözden kaçmaktadır. Bu podcastımızda Yard. Doç. Dr. Tülün Değirmenci resimli el yazmalarındaki I. Selim (1512-1520) imgesi üzerinden 17. yüzyıl Osmanlı şehirlilerinin tarih algısını inceliyor. Siyaset, popüler algı ve tarihyazımı arasındaki ilişkiyi gözler önüne sermekle kalmıyor, ikonografi, kitap üretimi ve okuma kültürü gibi Osmanlı entellektüel tarihinin önemli mevzularını da mercek altına alıyor. - See more at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2013/01/sultan-selim-image-art.html#sthash.lna5r537.dpuf. . .

  Direct Link   Download 49 Minutes 04 Mar 2014

E073 | Birçok araştırmacı zengin ve köklü bir geleneğe sahip olan İslam hat sanatının ortaya çıkışını İslam dininin insan suretinin resmedilmesini yasaklaması ile açıklamaya çalışmıştır. Ancak, bu yorum İslam dünyasının kültür ve tarihi hakkında bir takım yanlış çıkarsamalara olduğu kadar, Batının tarihi ve kültürel gelişimini normatif olarak kabul eden modası geçmiş bir tarihsel metodolojiye de dayanmaktadır. Bu bölümde Irvin Cemil Schick İslam toplumlarında sanat hakkındaki klişeleri yeniden gözden geçirirken, hat sanatını kendine özgü ve bağımsız bir sembolik sanat formu olarak değerlendirmektedir. - See more at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2012/10/islamiccalligraphy.html#sthash.mcJyPue2.dpuf. . .

  Direct Link   Download 13 Minutes 03 Mar 2014

E039 | For at least two centuries, Western countries have used international criminal, civil, and commercial law as a means of influencing the Ottoman and Turkish governments, leading some to speak of a phenomenon called legal imperialism, and while these efforts have impacted policies in Turkey, they have not always achieved their intended effect. In this episode, Chris Gratien discusses an interesting case of would-be trademark infringement in early Republican Turkey, as the Kolynos toothpaste company sought to protect its commercial rights against an alleged act of Turkish piracy. However, in the case file, we also learn some other things about American sensibilities at the turn of the twentieth century, particularly with regards to racism in marketing, allowing us to make some observations about the peculiar legal foundations of global capitalism. - See more at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2011/12/turkish-knockoff-toothpaste-legal.html#sthash.wjSpSgCi.dpuf. . .

  Direct Link   Download 35 Minutes 03 Mar 2014

E136 | When are policies driven by prejudice, and when do policies give rise to prejudiced representations? In this episode, Nicholas Danforth explores depictions of Middle East politics in the Turkish satirical periodical Akbaba from the 1930s onward in an attempt to understand the politics of representation. - See more at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2013/12/arabs-turkish-eyes-politics.html#sthash.VbssFRPK.dpuf. . .

  Direct Link   Download 42 Minutes 03 Mar 2014

E062 | Historians have used classical Ottoman texts to explore social issues such as sexuality, with compiled manuscripts from various literary genres often forming a data-mine for historical information. However, this type of selective reading has often distorted or obscured the original meaning and context of literary works. Sometimes, texts that appear erotic or sexual in nature such as gazel could have been intended for an entirely different purpose. In this episode, Dr. Selim Kuru examines the concepts of mahbub peresti (worship of the beloved) and gulâm pâregi (pederasty) and various motifs concerning male beauty in the shehrengiz (Gibb's "city-thrillers") genre in search of a more contextualized approach these would-be erotic texts. - See more at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2012/08/boys-god-and-beauty-approaching-sex-and.html#sthash.kCDvzZoR.dpuf. . .

  Direct Link   Download 34 Minutes 02 Mar 2014

E114 | During the interwar period, nationalist and socialist movements throughout the world looked to the peasant as both the source and object of state programs wherein establishing a link between the center and the provinces was a critical part of fostering the sense of nation devised by elite intellectuals. In Turkey, the ideas of Ziya Gökalp regarding the importance of the Anatolian villager in the development of Turkish national culture are a prominent example of how interwar nationalists saw the peasant as the stuff of the nation. Within this context, various programs designed to link the center and the periphery both economically and culturally emerged, and in this episode, Seçil Yılmaz discusses one such project, which sent professionally-trained Turkish painters into the Anatolian countryside over the period of 1938 to 1943 to create artistic depictions of the Turkish nation. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2010/07/art-painting-turkey-anatolia.html Episode No. 114 Release date: 19 July 2013 IMAGES Images of the Yurt Gezileri paintings have been published by the Milli Reasürans Art Gallery in Istanbul in a book entitled Yurt gezileri ve yurt resimleri SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY Akgül, Alphan. “Sanatçının Kendiliğinden Felsefesi, Görsel İdeoloji ve Ressamların yurt Gezileri”, Dipnot, no. 1, (Yaz 2003). Dino, Abidin. Kısa Hayat Öyküm, ed.Ferit Edgü. İstanbul : YKY, 1995. Erol, Turan. “Ressamların Yurt Gezileri ve Sonuçları” in Yurt Gezileri ve Yurt Resimleri, İstanbul: Milli Reasürans Sanat Galerisi, 1998. Germener, Sema. “Cumhuriyet Resmi” in Cumhuriyetin Renkleri Biçimleri, İstanbul: Tarih Vakfı Yurt Yayınları,1998. Karaduman, Hüseyin “Eski Eser Yasalarında Özel Müzeler, Koleksiyonculuk, Ticaret ve Müzayedeler, in 4. Müzecilik Semineri : Bildiriler 16 - 18 Eylül 1998. İstanbul : Askeri Müze, 1998. Karaömerlioğlu, Asım M. “Tek Parti Dönemi’nde Halkçılık”, in Modern Türkiye'de Siyasi Düşünce: Kemalizm, Murat Belge (ed.). İstanbul : İletişim Yayınları, 2004. Karaömerlioğlu, Asım M. “Tek Parti Döneminde Halkevleri ve Halkçılık”, Toplum Bilim 88, (Bahar 2001) Koçak, Orhan. “1920’lerden 1970’lere Kültür Politikaları” in Modern Türkiye'de Siyasi Düşünce: Kemalizm Murat Belge (ed.). İstanbul : İletişim Yayınları, 2004. Öndin, Nilüfer. Cumhuriyet’in Kültür Politikası ve Sanat, İnsancıl Yayınları:İstanbul, 2003. Yaman, Zeynep Yasa. “ Değişen Manzaralar: Kültür ve Modernite”, Sanat Dünyamız, no.89, (Güz 2003). Yurt Gezileri ve Yurt Resimleri, İstanbul: Milli Reasürans Sanat Galerisi, 1998.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 43 Minutes 02 Mar 2014

E081 | Osman Hamdi Bey is recognized today as the foremost artist of the late-Ottoman period. Yet, in his time, it was his unique access to the ancient past as the head of Istanbul's archaeology museum that drew the interest of his Western contemporaries. In this episode, Emily Neumeier retraces the story of a rare Osman Hamdi Bey painting (At the Mosque Door, 1890 - click for high res image) that turned up in the Penn archaeology museum and explains what it tells us about art, artifacts, and diplomacy during the late-Ottoman era.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 47 Minutes 02 Mar 2014

E124 Part 2 | While science was once understood by historians "on its own terms," i.e. as a rational means of arriving at objective truths about the natural world, over the past decades, historians of science have illustrated the numerous ways in which scientific production is rooted in social and material contexts. In part one of this two-part series on the history of science, Nir Shafir leads us in an exploration of some of the main shifts in views of science and its history. In part two, we discuss the nascent field of history of science in the Ottoman Empire and Muslim world and explore the state of current historiography and where it is headed. - See more at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2012/09/science-ottoman-empire-muslim-world-islamic.html#sthash.XGciAAbq.dpuf. . .

  Direct Link   Download 65 Minutes 02 Mar 2014

E127 | Historians have come to understand the Enlightenment, a cultural movement emphasizing reason and individualism, as a phenomenon of increasingly early origins that pervaded early modern European intellectual circles. This begs the question: as one of Europe's largest polities of the period, was the Ottoman Empire also party to this intellectual trend. In this episode, Harun Küçük describes what he defines as an Ottoman Enlightenment and explains the ways in which the movement of individuals and ideas linked the Ottoman capital of Istanbul to the broader cultural shifts of the day. - See more at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2013/10/enlightenment-ottoman-empire-intellectuals.html#sthash.kD801ye0.dpuf. . .

  Direct Link   Download 31 Minutes 02 Mar 2014

E137 | What does it mean to wield or possess a certain technology? What are the limits to associational claims to technical expertise or superiority? In this podcast, Daniel Pontillo considers these cultural and social dimensions of technology through a study of the travel narrative Across Asia on a Bicycle, in which two American men set out at in the heat of the late nineteenth-century bicycle craze to use their new technology to tame the rugged Asian geography. In our discussion, we focus on the first leg of their trip, which was carried out in Ottoman Anatolia. . .

  Direct Link   Download 23 Minutes 02 Mar 2014

E040 | Human beings live their lives under a state of constant observation that is both perceived and real. Widespread folk traditions such as the notion of the "evil eye" (Turkish: nazar) reflect a belief in the profound power of the mere act of looking, which psychoanalysts such as Lacan have developed into theories of gaze (French: le regard) and the gaze effect that have gained resonance within the humanities and the social sciences. In this episode, Dan Pontillo joins us to discuss the gaze from the perspectives of psychoanalysis, the social sciences, and the scientific approaches of vision study and eye tracking. http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2011/12/gaze-daniel-pontillo.html Episode No. 40 Release date: 31 December 2011 This is a thematic discussion and not a piece of original research. In addition to the authors and publications mentioned in the podcast, we recommend the following list for further reading. Select Bibliography Lacan, Jacques. The Four Fundamental Concepts of Psycho-Analysis. New York: W.W. Norton, 1998. Foucault, Michel. Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison. New York: Vintage Books, 1995. Derrida, Jacques, Marie-Louise Mallet, and David Wills. The Animal That Therefore I Am. New York: Fordham University Press, 2008. Scott, James C. Seeing Like a State: How Certain Schemes to Improve the Human Condition Have Failed. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1998. Said, Edward W. Orientalism. New York: Pantheon Books, 1978. Najmabadi, Afsaneh. Women with Mustaches and Men Without Beards: Gender and Sexual Anxieties of Iranian Modernity. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005. Memmi, Albert. The Colonizer and the Colonized. New York: Orion Press, 1965.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 37 Minutes 02 Mar 2014

E130 | Inheritance and the transfer of property across generations connects the history of families to a broader analysis of political economy, particularly in societies where wealth and capital are deeply rooted in the earth. In this episode, Zoe Griffith provides a framework for the study of family history through the lens of the mulberry tree and its produce in a study of Ottoman court records from Tripoli (modern-day Lebanon). - See more at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2011/11/ottoman-lebanon-property.html#sthash.zmasZjw1.dpuf. . .

  Direct Link   Download 54 Minutes 02 Mar 2014

E132 | Alchemy has traditionally been understood as a pseudoscience or protoscience that eventually gave way to modern chemistry. Less often have the writings of alchemists been studied on their own terms. Yet, given the endurance and prolific nature of the alchemical traditions and the involvement of important figures of "modern science" such as Isaac Newton in the field of alchemy, a teleological understanding of the transition from alchemy to chemistry seems inadequate for discussing how science was practiced in the past. This may be particularly true for the Ottoman context, where a longstanding tradition of alchemy becomes subsumed under a larger narrative of the triumph of Western science during the nineteenth century. In this podcast, Tuna Artun explores the world of alchemy and discusses its transformation during the Ottoman period. - See more at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2013/12/alchemy-ottoman-empire.html#sthash.d8GWTykK.dpuf. . .

  Direct Link   Download 40 Minutes 08 Jan 2014

E140 | Historians have begun to explore the paradox of the identification of a would-be universal form of rational knowledge known as science with the particular historical experience of Europe. This begs the question: how have new forms of scientific knowledge been translated, received, assimilated, and engaged outside of the cultural contexts within which they were produced? In this episode, Marwa Elshakry examines the case of Arab engagement with and translation of Darwin's theory of evolution, which is the subject of her recently published book entitled Reading Darwin in Arabic, 1860-1950. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2014/01/darwin-evolution-arabic-translation.html Marwa Elshakry is Associate Professor of History at Columbia University. Chris Gratien is a doctoral candidate at Georgetown University studying the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the Middle East.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 31 Minutes 24 Dec 2013

E138 | Medicine is not merely a practice that takes place in hospitals, clinics, and laboratories. It also involves the movement and operation of medical practitioners in different social spaces. In this episode, Anat Mooreville discusses traveling doctors in Israel/Palestine and their role not only in combating trachoma (a severe eye disease that causes blindness) but also as ethnographers and go-betweens within the framework of a Zionist national project. - See more at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2013/12/trachoma-medicine-doctors-israel-palestine.html#sthash.RfG7UFFP.dpuf. . .

  Direct Link   Download 38 Minutes 18 Dec 2013

E135 | The term Lubunca refers to a type of slang historically used among Istanbul’s LGBTQ communities. The term has gained currency only in the past decades, but in this podcast, Nicholas Kontovas suggest much deeper orgins in an overview of this underground jargon and its connections to the historical sociolinguistics of Turkey’s urban communities. More at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2013/12/istanbul-slang.html#sthash.OwJLfeAj.dpuf Nicholas Kontovas is a graduate student in the Department of Central Eurasian Studies at Indiana University Chris Gratien is a doctoral candidate at Georgetown University researching the social environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East Lydia Harrington is a graduate student at the University of Washington. . .

  Direct Link   Download 51 Minutes 31 Oct 2013

E128 | Sinemanın ilk yıllarını, kinetoscope, vitascope ya da cinématographe gibi hareketli görüntü teknolojilerinin tarihi olarak okumak yeterli olabilir mi? Bu podcastta Prof. Nezih Erdoğan ve Serkan Şavk, Osmanlı’daki sinema deneyimini seyir ve hayret gibi kavramlar üzerinden tartışıyorlar.. . .

  Direct Link   Download 33 Minutes 17 Apr 2013

E102 | Following the World War I period, the founders of a new Turkish Republic sought to define and legitimize the new order as a break with the Ottoman past. In this episode, Yasemin Gencer explains the ways in which notions such as childhood were used to construct the image of a renewed Turkish society in the nationalist press during the early years of the Republican period. - See more at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2013/04/childhood-family-press-turkish-nationalism-republic.html#sthash.uqU18HX1.dpuf. . .

  Direct Link   Download 46 Minutes 11 Apr 2013

E101 | During the nineteenth century, imperial states became increasingly concerned with the management of disease and resources. For the Ottoman Empire, the issues of disease and water converged on the hajj pilgrimage, which brought annual throngs of thirsty disease vectors to the Hijaz region. In this podcast, Michael Christopher Low examines the su meselesi or “water issue” of the Ottoman Empire during the Hamidian era and its importance for understanding the ecological transformation of Saudi Arabia over the past century. - See more at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2010/04/hajj-water-saudi-arabia.html#sthash.fgnjJS2h.dpuf. . .

  Direct Link   Download 34 Minutes 23 Jan 2013

E090 | During the nineteenth century, the urban space of Istanbul was transformed by actors consciously involved in reshaping the face of Ottoman and high society in this European capital. In this episode, Nilay Özlü explores the culture and architecture of the Pera neighborhood during these formative years through the story of three generations of the Vallaury family, Levantine Istanbulites who rose to prominence in the fields of cuisine, cafe culture, and finally architecture through the figure of Alexander Vallaury. - See more at: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2013/01/pera-istanbul-architecture.html#sthash.5be9UL8H.dpuf. . .

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